Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWeightlifting
IN THE NEWS

Weightlifting

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By ALAN J. CRAVER and ALAN J. CRAVER,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1995
A former Oakland Mills High School student has filed a lawsuit against the Howard County Board of Education and two physical education instructors for injuries she received in a weightlifting accident in January.Kim Lee, 17, of Baltimore is seeking $500,000 in damages for the incident in which weights crashed down on her and crushed her throat and jaw, according to the lawsuit filed in Howard Circuit Court Sept. 28.In addition to the school board, Ms. Lee has named instructors Samuel Singleton and Brian Winfield as defendants.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Rick Maese and Rick Maese,Sun reporter | August 13, 2008
BEIJING - Natalie Woolfolk's knees were steady, her arms straight and her smile big as the room. Above her head, she proudly hoisted a lifetime of training and her Olympic dreams - not to mention more than 250 pounds of weights. But she also lifted high the dreams of her fiance, a fellow weightlifter who learned just one day before the opening ceremony that he wouldn't be competing at these Games. There'd be no gold medal for Woolfolk, an Arnold native and Broadneck High graduate, but at that moment, it didn't really matter.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,Staff Writer | August 23, 1992
Don't talk to Joe Singleton about his limitations.He would rather shift the conversation to his achievements, his goals, his dreams.Singleton has much to talk about. Like the martial arts black belt he earned two years ago. Or the college degree he plans to earn soon. Or the trip he is about to make to Barcelona, Spain next month, when he will represent the United States Disabled Sports Team as a power lifter in the Paralympics, the international Olympic equivalent for wheelchair athletes.
NEWS
By JONI GUHNE and JONI GUHNE,Special to The Sun | January 26, 2007
Eavesdrop on a conversation among women of a certain age, and you're likely to hear one of them say, "Fifty is the new 35." But how do women maintain youthful vigor into their fifth, sixth, seventh and later decades? Anne Arundel Medical Center is offering a modern alternative, StrongWomen, a national physical fitness regimen of weight training for women age 50 and older. It was founded by Miriam E. Nelson, director of the Center for Physical Activity and Nutrition and associate professor at the Friedman School of Nutrition at Tufts University.
FEATURES
By Jacquelynn Boyle and Jacquelynn Boyle,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 18, 1993
A few years ago, Corky Navarro got tired of carrying 176 pounds on her 5-foot frame and joined a gym. Today, 66 pounds lighter and wearing a size 3, her slim, sculpted physique is a testament to what weightlifting can do for women."
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,Sun Staff Writer | March 29, 1994
Francis Scott Key junior Steve Lessard tries to explain what weightlifting is all about.Dedication, strength, speed, technique, mind set and time -- a lot of time."
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart and John W. Stewart,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1998
Increasingly in the past few years, it has become easy to find the most dedicated athletes, regardless of their sport. They're in the weight room.Scientific, as well as athletic journals detail the advantages of weight training when done properly. More people are understanding how muscles are used in the performance of their sports.In the past, many people wrinkled their noses at the sport of weightlifting. Weightlifters attracted attention in Olympic years, but otherwise usually went unnoticed.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 10, 2000
Top weightlifters from across the nation with hopes of competing in the Summer Olympics later this year in Sydney, Australia, are in Frederick for the USA Weightlifting National Championships today through Sunday. This event is one of six used to qualify the U.S. Olympic weightlifting team for the 2000 Games, and it's the final opportunity for senior lifters to qualify for July's U.S. Olympic trials in New Orleans. The first qualifying event was the World Championships, held in November in Athens, Greece, where the U.S. women's team finished sixth, earning the right for the United States to send a complete women's team of four athletes to the 2000 Games, where women's weightlifting will make its Olympic debut.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1996
ATLANTA -- They came to praise the Olympian who drinks, smokes, wants to make movies and wants to marry a Kennedy. They waved their Turkish flags and sang their Turkish songs and painted their faces with crescent moons and stars.And when Naim Suleymanoglu, Turkey's 4-foot-11 "pocket Hercules," hoisted a refrigerator-sized, world-record weight above his head on his way to claiming his record third Olympic gold medal yesterday, they cheered and danced in the aisles."Have you ever heard of 'Little Big Man,' the movie?"
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1996
It was an easy sell.Leo Totten, coach of the Iron Eagle Club at Francis Scott Key, asked Chris Forman to give weightlifting a chance.Forman first connected with Totten through gymnastics. Totten's daughter competed at the same club where Forman spent eight years participating.Totten rattles off the ingredients needed to be a successful Olympic-style weightlifter: speed, strength, explosiveness, flexibility and balance."You really need to be a good all-around athlete," he added. "Chris' gymnastics background helped him right off the bat. He already had the strength and all the other attributes.
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | July 11, 2004
I've started lifting weights three times a week and have become more muscular than I want to be. I love the way lifting makes me feel, but what can I do to stay leaner? The idea that weightlifting will automatically give you big muscles is a myth. With a few modifications to your routine, you can have the calorie-blasting and toning benefits of lifting without the thick muscles. First, increase the number of repetitions you are doing to 12-15 (my guess is you are doing 8-10 now). To maintain good form through the final repetitions, you may have to use a lighter weight (the muscle should still be spent after 12-15 reps)
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2002
Larry Atkinson, 75, is off his rocker. He must be, in order to pick up a barbell and hoist 230 pounds. Atkinson is too busy lifting weights and carrying off trophies to set on the front porch and snooze. "There's this universal mind-set of, `My God, he's 75, he should be pushing up daisies,' " says Atkinson, of Monkton. "You should see the reception I get at competitions. Everyone applauds like I'm Lazarus come back from the dead. "Well, I'm here to straighten out their brains." And take home some hardware.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,Sun Staff | January 20, 2002
Meg Harrington took the tortoise approach to fitness when she decided to shed pounds after her third child was born: She started slow, lifting weights, but not the traditional way. She is using a slow-motion training technique that she and others say is difficult, but effective at building muscle, promoting weight loss and developing strength. Her SuperSlow workout has produced results: She's 7 pounds lighter and 4 inches trimmer. "It takes every ounce of strength that I have," says Harrington, 39, a homemaker and business consultant in Sterling, Va. "After about six or eight weeks, I got to the point where I hated it, and it felt like labor, but you know, when my 18 minutes were up, I was really proud of myself."
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 21, 2001
Q. We are going to plant several shade trees in our yard this fall. Is there any advantage to buying a balled and burlapped tree instead of a container tree? A. The one advantage of a balled and burlapped tree is that you can purchase larger trees. Balled and burlapped trees can be 6 inches or more in diameter, while container-grown trees are typically 3 inches or less. However, very few people plant trees larger than 3 inches in diameter. Container-grown trees are lighter and easier to handle.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 25, 2001
DUNDALK, YOU should be proud of this guy - I'll give you his name in a minute - because he's one of yours, he turned 70 years old on Memorial Day and, at a national weightlifting competition here two weeks ago, he bench-pressed 330 pounds. Think of what that means. That means, if Tony Siragusa ever sat on this senior citizen ... he'd suffocate. But if the Goose's lighter Ravens teammate, Sam Adams, sat on him, our hero - I'll give you his name in a minute - could lift him straight up and lock arms.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | April 25, 2001
Entries are now being accepted for the 20th annual Maryland High School Bench Press Championships on May 19. Twelve weight classes ranging from 120 pounds to unlimited are being offered. Awards will be handed to the top three finishers in each weight class, and an Outstanding Lifter award will be presented to the person who presses the highest percentage of weight above his actual body weight and wins his weight class. The Bowling Brook Preparatory School in Keymar will be this year's host.
NEWS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1999
YORK, Pa. -- The Colossus of Rhodes was one of the seven wonders of the ancient world. More than 100 feet high, the effigy of Helios the sun god stood for decades overlooking the harbor of the Greek island. But chances are, more people have seen the colossus of York.That's the well-muscled fellow hoisting iron and revolving on a pedestal hard by Exit 11 of Interstate 83. The minicolossus rises maybe 40 feet into the air and draws the attention of speeding motorists to York Barbell Co. Inc.For nearly a half-century, York reigned as the U.S. capital of weightlifting, largely because of the will, business acumen and ego of Bob Hoffman.
SPORTS
By Robert Markus and Robert Markus,Chicago Tribune | June 21, 1992
CHICAGO -- When Roger Nielsen went to the Montreal Olympics in 1976, he drove his own car and had to buy tickets from scalpers to see the weightlifting finals in the heavier events.This year he'll have a better seat at the Barcelona Games, and it won't cost him a thing. Unless you include the countless hours he devoted to the sport until being named head coach of the U.S. Olympic weightlifting team.Most of his time was spent at Chicago's Sayre Park, where for a dozen years he has been a volunteer coach.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | March 11, 2001
Many older adults would like to lose weight, but 66-year-old Kate Kelly is interested in adding pounds - to her barbells. Kelly is a weightlifter, and a national record-holder. The Arbutus resident loves to pump iron. She competes in the bench press, pushing a barbell up from her chest while lying on her back, and the curl, in which she bends her arms to draw a barbell from waist height up to her chest. In December, she won two gold trophies - one for lifting 55 pounds in the curl, a national record for her age and gender, and one is for the state record in the bench press: 100 pounds.
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2001
Sometimes reality takes awhile to sink in. It has for 6-foot-5, 285-pound Westminster offensive tackle Trent Bosley. "My freshman year I never thought that I'd ever be getting a full scholarship to play football somewhere," Bosley said. "It's still kind of hard to believe, now." Bosley made an oral commitment to James Madison last weekend and expects to sign Wednesday. A first-team All-Carroll and first-team All-Central Maryland Conference selection last fall, Bosley was also honorable mention All-State as the Owls posted a 6-4 record.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.