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FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Special to The Sun | May 3, 1994
Anne Fletcher got tired of all the negative talk about the impossibility of losing weight and keeping it off. So she set out to find the "masters" who have lost significant amounts of weight and kept it off for three or more years.Her interviews with 160 real people, intertwined with scientific research, yields "Thin for Life: 10 Keys to Success from people who have Lost Weight and Kept It Off" from Chapters Press.Of the people she interviewed, seven out of 10 have lost 40 pounds or more.
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NEWS
By Andrea Siegel and Andrea Siegel,Staff Writer | May 25, 1993
This week, employees find out who are the biggest losers at the Westinghouse Corp.Eighty contestants, divided into 13 teams, are vying to see who dropped the most weight, which teams met their pound-loss goals and who racked up the most health points during a 10-week program aimed at promoting weight loss through a healthy lifestyle.Small prizes await.Bob Kontoff, an engineer manager, went through "HoHo withdrawal," but others on the Fat-Free and Loving It team helped him through. The Pikesville resident had wanted to lose 10 pounds, and although he missed his goal by 3 pounds, he said he's going to stick with the program.
NEWS
By BONNIE MILLER RUBIN AND VINCENT J. SCHODOLSKI and BONNIE MILLER RUBIN AND VINCENT J. SCHODOLSKI,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 3, 2006
The news that a weight-loss pill will soon be sold over the counter, allowing Americans to pig out without worrying about their waistlines, is a dream that ranks right up there with a knock on the door from Publishers Clearinghouse. But don't hit that buffet table just yet. The fat-blocking pill comes with plenty of caveats, according to those who have already had firsthand experiences with the drug orlistat, which has been sold in prescription form as Xenical since 1999. "I'd give it low marks," said Scot Roskelley, 49, who used it during 2002, without seeing any results on the scale.
NEWS
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,Los Angeles Times | November 3, 2006
The nation's soaring obesity rates won't fall until Americans stop placing their faith in unproven and possibly fraudulent weight-loss products and treatments. That's the message from some of the nation's top obesity experts, commenting on new data about Americans' continued, naive hope for the quick fix. Part of the problem, they say, is consumers' misconceptions about safety laws. A national survey released last month at the annual meeting of the Obesity Society found that 60 percent of Americans believe incorrectly that over-the-counter dietary supplements for weight loss must be tested and proven to be safe and effective.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2000
Steven H. Johnson, one of three contenders for the Board of Education seat from South County, has suspended his candidacy because of health problems. Johnson, of Annapolis, said yesterday that he is awaiting test results to explain his continued weight loss before deciding whether to reenter the school board contest. "I've been suffering [from] a weight loss problem for a time, and it seems to be accelerating," he said. "I decided it wasn't a good thing to be in the middle of a campaign."
FEATURES
By Kathey Clarey and Kathey Clarey,McClatchy News Service | June 25, 1993
Irene O'Garden spent some 30 years of her life hating her body. She'd overeat and balloon up in weight, then go on a diet, then overeat again. And all the while a voice inside would tell her how stupid and unworthy she was.Finally, Ms. O'Garden accepted herself and, as she writes in her new book, "Fat Girl" (HarperSan Francisco, $12), "I gather up the cookie-bloated child, the aching-hearted teen, the wounded Bitch Within, and thank them all for teaching me. I give them love. I let them go."
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | December 31, 1991
The last Jingle Bells have segued into Auld Lang Syne, but the ghost of this past Christmas may be lingering along jowls and waistlines. Americans traditionally gain weight -- four to seven pounds, by some accounts -- between Thanksgiving and New Year's. Just as traditionally, January has been the month for weight-loss resolutions.But the manic desire for quick-fix diets may be waning: Surveys by the Calorie Control Council, a trade group representing the manufacturers of low-calorie, low-fat foods, indicate a decline in dieters -- from 65 million in 1986 to 48 million at present.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2005
All the attention paid to the Atkins diet didn't much faze Bradley T. MacDonald, even though the competing weight-loss program hurt sales at his Owings Mills business last year. He was certain it wouldn't last - in fact, he suspected the attention would do Atkins in. "I saw problems when Atkins started Atkin-izing TGI Fridays" in 2003, he said. "At that point, you knew that there was problems." Yesterday, his hunch proved true. Atkins Nutraceuticals Inc. - founded on the controversial low-carb, full-fat diet pioneered by the late Dr. Robert C. Atkins - filed for bankruptcy protection in New York, unable to survive its strategy of going after a mass market and purporting to be a lifestyle.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 10, 2004
WASHINGTON - Six companies that claimed their products enabled consumers to shed pounds and inches without the need for exercise or dieting are being sued by the Federal Trade Commission, the agency announced yesterday. The actions, filed in federal district courts, are part of a FTC legal and educational initiative aimed at the weight-loss industry and called Operation Big Fat Lie. The FTC has won temporary restraining orders against two of the companies - Femina Inc. of Pembroke Pines, Fla., and AVS Marketing Inc. of Thomson, Ill. - barring them from making false claims in ads for any of their weight-loss products.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frances G. Taylor and Frances G. Taylor,HARTFORD COURANT | January 8, 2001
It's that time of year, when thoughts turn to that perennial subject of dieting. For many, it's an issue that never really goes away, but returns in full force as remorse over holiday eating sets in. So what haven't you tried yet? The Atkins Diet? Weight Watchers? Jenny Craig? You could read more books about dieting. There's "Dieting for Dummies" by Jane Kirby; "Dieting With the Duchess: Secrets and Sensible Advice for a Great Body" by Sarah Ferguson; "The Turbo-Protein Diet: Stop Yo-Yo Dieting Forever" by Dieter Market; "The Skinny: What Every Skinny Woman Knows About Dieting and Won't Tell You" by Patricia Marx; and "When You Eat at the Refrigerator, Pull Up a Chair" by Geneen Roth, to name just a few. Or you could go online.
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