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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
On a nice winter day, I took a stroll and found my garden covered with weeds. This garden was bare soil last fall when I put it to bed. Not a weed in sight. Now it's a blanket of bright green flourishing weeds! How can that be? Those are winter annual weeds. Their seeds sprout in fall or early winter. They're inconspicuous at first, and in a bitter winter they don't really do much until spring. But with all our warm days this winter, they've been growing like gangbusters. Chickweed is a common one. You can pull them out. Or, since they don't have extensive root systems, most can be cut to the ground and will not regrow.
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By Ellen Nibali and For The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
Do I need to keep weeding in fall? There are only a few little weeds, and wouldn't it be better to spend my time, say, pruning? A weed pulled in time saves nine - or 90. Many summer weeds are now loaded with thousands of seeds. Also, many weeds known as winter annuals start now and will explode with growth in spring. Hairy bittercress is one of these; it's is a tidy rosette now and almost a joy to pull, it's so easy. Because it has no seeds yet, you can throw it on the lawn and chop it up when you mow, adding organic matter to improve your topsoil.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Hiaasen | August 6, 2012
Little Boxes on the hillside, little boxes filled with sticky weed. Little boxes on the hillside, little boxes will get you high. When Nancy looks for work, she remembers to leave brick dancer, soccer mom drug dealer, arsonist, and most hardcore MILF off her resume. Meanwhile, her sister Jill is pregnant. Hopefully not with Doug's baby, and when I say "hopefully," I am quoting her. Andy has been parenting Nancy's children, then Jill's creepy twins, and even Nancy and Jill themselves.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | May 23, 2014
Not quite four years ago, I began some trips to St. Vincent Cemetery, an old and abandoned burying ground largely surrounded by the Clifton Park Golf Course in Northeast Baltimore. In that summer of 2010, a small group of descendants of those buried there initiated a campaign to get the weeds and invasive trees cut down - and to win respect for the spot where nearly 3,700 people rest. Last fall, a 15-year-old Dulaney High School sophomore from Lutherville, John Patrick Nolan III, stepped up. As his Eagle Scout project, he decided to improve the cemetery's condition.
BUSINESS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
How should I mulch a vegetable garden? Do I need to mulch all of it? Anywhere you don't want weeds will require mulch. Mulch helps retain moisture and moderate soil temperatures, but weed suppression is the No. 1 goal because weeds steal water, nutrients and sunlight from vegetables. Organic mulches of mowed leaves or straw with three to four layers of newspaper underneath make an impenetrable barrier to weeds while allowing rain to soak through. These will last the growing season and decompose over the winter, feeding the soil.
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | May 24, 1992
Weeds are like obnoxious relatives. They pop in unannounced. They take over your bed. They mooch your food. And they won't leave unless threatened with a garden hoe. While that might work on cousin Frank, I have my doubts about dandelions.Excuse my sarcasm. I just spent two hours digging weeds from '' the garden. Most of that time I spent on my hands and knees, ripping up fistfuls of chickweed and purslane and God knows what other bothersome plants in the vegetable patch.Why did he make weeds, anyway?
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2010
Question: What can I use to kill invasive weeds along my stream? I hear that the most common weed killer also kills aquatic life. Answer: Use a weed killer formulated for use near water. We think the weed killer you are referring to is one containing glyphosate, a systemic herbicide which is very effective on difficult weeds because it goes down and kills the roots. The problem is not the glyphosate itself, but the "inert" ingredients that are added to it. So, when you need to apply a glyphosate herbicide near water, find a product specially formulated to be aquatic safe: such as Erasure or Rodeo.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and For The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
Do I need to keep weeding in fall? There are only a few little weeds, and wouldn't it be better to spend my time, say, pruning? A weed pulled in time saves nine - or 90. Many summer weeds are now loaded with thousands of seeds. Also, many weeds known as winter annuals start now and will explode with growth in spring. Hairy bittercress is one of these; it's is a tidy rosette now and almost a joy to pull, it's so easy. Because it has no seeds yet, you can throw it on the lawn and chop it up when you mow, adding organic matter to improve your topsoil.
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | August 1, 1993
My vegetable garden has produced more than 200 pounds of greens this year, including 20 pounds of spinach and 10 pounds of lettuce.Alas, the rest is weeds.It has been a banner year for burdock, and the chickweed just won't quit. I've been digging up chickweed for nearly six months. I've harvested six wheelbarrows of the stuff. Why can't vegetables grow with such gusto?I've gathered enough ground ivy to fill two garbage cans, and enough purslane to fill Imelda Marcos' purse. Still, the weeds keep coming.
NEWS
April 19, 1992
FREDERICK -- Researcher Rick Bennett is spending four months this year traveling Europe looking for sick weeds.The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) plant pathologist is looking for diseases to kill Mediterranean and Eastern European weeds brought over by immigrants over the past 500 years.Many of this nation's worst weeds were brought unwittingly more than 100 years ago by settlers bringing seeds to grow crops here, but the weeds' natural enemies were left at home, said Mr. Bennett, who is based at USDA laboratories at Fort Detrick.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
What can I do outdoors when we have a surprise nice day? I'm itching to garden. Pull up winter weeds. Some are already blooming! You can also prune, but wait for warmer weather in March for roses or fruit trees (especially peach and plum). As you wait to prune, this is a great time to get a clean look at branch structure and assess which limbs need to be removed because of rubbing branches or disease. For more pruning direction, check out the ornamental fact sheets on the University of Maryland Extension's Home and Garden Information Center website (under the Information Library publications)
NEWS
By Steve Jones, For The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
Some youngsters attend summer camp to swim or play sports, but Mona King and Marilyn Smith spent Wednesday morning getting acquainted with horses. The two 13-year-olds, both rising eighth-graders at Elkridge Landing Middle School, groomed and cleaned their new equine friends at the Days End Farm Horse Rescue complex in Woodbine. "I was 2 when I first got up close and touched a horse," said Mona, a Hanover resident who said she wants to be a veterinarian. The visit to Days End, which provides care for abused and neglected horses, was part of a summer camp experience sponsored by the Columbia Association that has young campers spending most of the week caring for others.
NEWS
By Diane Kuhn | July 10, 2013
What does it take to become a good doctor? In the midst of a period of health care reform and primary care shortages, how we do to encourage talented students who want to give back to the community to go into medicine? Since the 1920s, the Medical College Admissions Test, or MCAT, has played a central role in the admissions process for prospective medical students, helping admissions officers make tough calls about which students are best qualified to train as physicians. Initially developed as a way to reduce drop out and flunk out rates, the test now helps differentiate between applicants with near-perfect grades, college leadership positions and shadowing experience.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
My son had beautiful, big willow oaks lining his gravel driveway until he put down a weed killer on the driveway weeds. Now the oak leaves have browned on the tree halves facing the driveway. What can we do at this point to save the trees? What a profound aesthetic, environmental and monetary loss. Several herbicides on the market have ingredients that readily travel down through the soil profile. When applying them, it's crucial to remember that the roots of a tree can extend out as much as 11/2 times the height of a tree.
BUSINESS
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
How should I mulch a vegetable garden? Do I need to mulch all of it? Anywhere you don't want weeds will require mulch. Mulch helps retain moisture and moderate soil temperatures, but weed suppression is the No. 1 goal because weeds steal water, nutrients and sunlight from vegetables. Organic mulches of mowed leaves or straw with three to four layers of newspaper underneath make an impenetrable barrier to weeds while allowing rain to soak through. These will last the growing season and decompose over the winter, feeding the soil.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
The last couple of years my lilac hasn't bloomed. It's always been a favorite. What can I do? There could be several causes. Because we've gotten many calls about this in recent years, it may be related to climate change. Our common lilac will technically grow in areas as warm as zone 7, but it needs a winter chilling period in order to form flower buds successfully. Other things to consider are pH (if it gets too acid, lime will raise it closer to 6.5-7), too much shade encroaching on this sun-loving plant or European hornets stripping bark and girdling branches (remove the oldest canes, which they prefer)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2003
In the summer kitchen at the Carroll County Farm Museum yesterday, a savory soup made from lamb's quarter, goosefoot and fat hen simmered in a cast-iron kettle on the open-hearth fire. Those meaty-sounding ingredients were actually weeds, freshly plucked from the museum's flower and vegetable beds. Their names may be unfamiliar, but the pesky plants are probably growing in most gardens. Yesterday's workshop, titled "Best-Dressed Weeds," included a foray onto the museum grounds in Westminster in search of ingredients, a class on cooking the typically discarded harvest and finally, lunch under a shady grape arbor.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2013
This morning, Baltimore young'uns with their eyes all aglow are hoping for a snow day. Republican Senator Rand Paul, meanwhile is charitably hoping that if the glow happens to come from the burning of an illicit substance, the kids' lives won't be ruined forever. Welcome to your post-weekend trends report for Monday, March 25, 2013. Paul is teaming up with Democrat Patrick Leahy to push for relaxation of mandatory minimum sentences for marijuana offenders, saying Sunday that either of the last two presidents could have had vastly different lives had they not been lucky with their own drug experiences.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2013
On a nice winter day, I took a stroll and found my garden covered with weeds. This garden was bare soil last fall when I put it to bed. Not a weed in sight. Now it's a blanket of bright green flourishing weeds! How can that be? Those are winter annual weeds. Their seeds sprout in fall or early winter. They're inconspicuous at first, and in a bitter winter they don't really do much until spring. But with all our warm days this winter, they've been growing like gangbusters. Chickweed is a common one. You can pull them out. Or, since they don't have extensive root systems, most can be cut to the ground and will not regrow.
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