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NEWS
April 13, 2005
On April 6, 2005, MALLORY B. WEDLOCK peacefully passed away at LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City, Utah. He is survived by his friend Ann Evans; two lovely children, Dashney Ann, Malik Mallory; mother, Florine Cook; father Harry Wedlock; sisters, Vivian Cook, Monica Wedlock and Zurita Brown; brothers Tyrone Wedlock and Jerry Gibson. He is also survived by other dear family and friends too numerous to list, but too special not to mention. On Thursday, friends may call at the VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES, 5151 Balto.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA and JEAN MARBELLA,jean.marbella@baltsun.com | September 4, 2008
I miss Murphy Brown. Not so much the sitcom of old, although I did watch it regularly and loved Candice Bergen's sass and style (great white shirts, cool accessories) as TV reporter Murphy Brown. But what I really miss is a time when campaign discourse about unwed pregnancy centered on a grown-up, albeit fictional, woman rather than a 17-year-old, and very real, girl. Back then - 1992, to be exact - it was slightly comical when Vice President Dan Quayle triggered a dispute by holding up Murphy Brown as a symbol of the breakdown in family values because the fictional character had a fictional baby out of fictional wedlock.
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FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | April 7, 1994
As politicians frame the discussion of welfare reform, as they offer their description of what a successful American family should look like, as they talk of the virtues and values we should be teaching our children, I find myself in a very uncomfortable place, a very unfamiliar place.I find myself agreeing with them.I am a member of the generation that rejected the Ozzie and Harriet family model. The revelation of my formative years, with Nixon and Laos and Kent State, was that you could not trust the pronouncements of white, male politicians.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Staff | January 28, 2007
The news that over half of the women in the United States are not living with their spouse made the headlines. What has happened to the institution of marriage? According to Andrew Cherlin, a sociologist at the Johns Hopkins University, a lot has happened to marriage over a long period of time that has led to these statistics. But interestingly, he finds that, if anything, the prestige of the institution has actually increased, even as examples of marriages deemed successful in previous generations - long and stable - have grown scarcer.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | April 4, 1995
On her 21st birthday, Lisa Winslow wrote a letter to her parents, thanking them for having her. They had been just that age when she was conceived -- out of wedlock -- and the change she must have made in their lives was very vivid for her."Thank you for giving me a family," Lisa wrote, "when a lot of other stories that started like yours very seldom end up like this one."Lisa died before she could deliver that birthday letter. Her parents discovered it among the things she left behind. Born too early, Lisa Winslow also died too early.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | May 18, 1992
Spotted owls don't vote.Olympia & York has more debt than a Third World country. Which says tons about the banks that lent to both.If the Serb leaders can't have Yugoslavia, no one can."Murphy Brown" tells teen-agers it's OK to have a baby out of wedlock -- when they are over 40 and making $1 million-up a year.
NEWS
By John J. Snyder and John J. Snyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 9, 1999
County Council Chairman C. Vernon Gray says that "all African-Americans are living black history."It's an important point to ponder now, during Black History Month.The important contribution of Africans to the vigorous growth of the United States is becoming better known through this yearly celebration.Researcher and re-enactor Houston D. Wedlock, a resident of Oakland Mills, tells of the Buffalo Soldiers, the black troops in the segregated Army who helped open up the West and fought with distinction, although they were denied many of the rights and privileges accorded white soldiers.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro | February 12, 1995
A quest for honor where it's long overdueFirst Sgt. Augustus Walley was not one to talk about his heroism. Nor was the United States government.That's why Houston D. Wedlock is determined to recognize him with a street named in his honor in Baltimore County.Mr. Wedlock, 58, discovered Sergeant Walley while poring over histories of the Buffalo Soldiers, African-Americans who served in segregated military units during every American conflict from the Indian wars to the Korean War."When you look at the defense of the nation, so many great role models have passed on," says Mr. Wedlock, a safety manager for Preston Trucking Co. "[In the media]
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1996
They traveled across the Western frontier, fighting rustlers and bandits to protect the nation's territories. But Houston Douglas Wedlock's great-great-uncle and other Buffalo Soldiers never reached most American his tory books.To correct the slight, Mr. Wedlock, of Columbia's Long Reach village, offers educational programs about his uncle, Charles Davis, and other members of the oft-decorated, all-black cavalries and infantries.The trucking company safety manager is the only Howard County member of the Baltimore chapter of the Buffalo Soldiers Association, which promotes the soldiers.
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | September 12, 1990
Washington THERE I WAS, feeling compulsion to join the journalism pack and write about the Bush-Gorbachev summit in Helsinki, when a little ''factoid'' crossed my television screen: ''Number of Births out of Wedlock up 50 Per Cent Since 1980.''I thought long and came to the realization that there was nothing that the Bush-Gorbachev meeting could do for America, or that Iraq could do to our country, that would be worse than what we have been doing to our children and ourselves.We have wallowed in bewilderment over a ''sexual revolution'' that has produced not only millions of ''illegitimate'' babies born unloved, under circumstances of present and future tragedy, but also an explosion of new sexually transmitted diseases like AIDS, herpes, chlamydia, not to mention explosions of out-of-style sexual curses such as gonorrhea and syphilis.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2005
SCHEDULE HIGHLIGHTS This weekend's events run the gamut from spoken-word poetry to book signings to musical performances and more. For a complete list, see baltimorebookfestival.com. MUSIC STAGE Tomorrow 5 p.m. -- LVT, acoustic rock 6:15 p.m. -- David Bach, contemporary jazz 7:45 p.m. -- Unity Reggae Band, reggae Saturday 11:30 a.m. -- Mambo Combo, soco/sambo 1 p.m. -- Almost Recess, a cappella 2:30 p.m. -- Charles "Big Daddy" Stallings, blues 4 p.m. -- Marc A. Evans, R&B/soul 5:45 p.m. -- The Players, ska/reggae Sunday 11:30 a.m. -- Rude Dog, blues 1:30 p.m. -- Chopteeth, Afro-funk 3 p.m. -- Melanie Mason, acoustic blues 4:30 p.m. -- Junkyard Saints, zydeco 6 p.m. -- The Carl Filipiak Group, contemporary jazz CITY LIT STAGE Tomorrow 5 p.m. -- Reception 6 p.m. -- "Camera Stories: Photographs & Narratives" featuring t.p. Luce, thaBloc, John Slaughter, Brother in the Bush Saturday 11 a.m. -- Maryland Writers Association Novel and Short Works Contest Winners 12:15 p.m. -- Jack Fruchtman, Atlantic Cousins: Benjamin Franklin and His Visionary Friends 1 p.m. -- Paul Mandelbaum, Garrett in Wedlock 1:45 p.m. -- Buzz Williams, Spare Parts 2:30 p.m. -- Masha Hamilton, The Distance Between Us and Staircase of a Thousand Steps 3:15 p.m. -- Writers on Publishing 4:30 p.m. -- Matt Bondurant, The Third Translation 5:15 p.m. -- Litapalooza, music and reading Sunday 11 a.m. -- Nurturing the Culture of Literature: What Is CityLit?
NEWS
April 13, 2005
On April 6, 2005, MALLORY B. WEDLOCK peacefully passed away at LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City, Utah. He is survived by his friend Ann Evans; two lovely children, Dashney Ann, Malik Mallory; mother, Florine Cook; father Harry Wedlock; sisters, Vivian Cook, Monica Wedlock and Zurita Brown; brothers Tyrone Wedlock and Jerry Gibson. He is also survived by other dear family and friends too numerous to list, but too special not to mention. On Thursday, friends may call at the VAUGHN C. GREENE FUNERAL SERVICES, 5151 Balto.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | August 19, 2003
Martha Horn and Barbara White are ready. If a Massachusetts court legalizes gay marriage soon, the lesbian couple from Laurel plan to head north and be among the first to apply for a license. The women, who have been together for 13 years, aren't out to prove a point about gay rights, they say. They just want the legal benefits of marriage. Specifically, they want health insurance for Horn, who suffers from diabetes but doesn't qualify as a spouse under the policy that White's employer provides.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1999
The deeply religious Evander Holyfield said he had "a revelation" that he would knock out Lennox Lewis in the third round of their first heavyweight title fight.But in a recent conference call, Holyfield revealed a deeper reason for his prognostication: That revelation was out of anger at being labeled a hypocrite by his opponent.Lewis, 34, had gotten under Holyfield's skin after implying that Holyfield -- who is married but has fathered five children out of wedlock -- wasn't quite so holy.
NEWS
By John J. Snyder and John J. Snyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 9, 1999
County Council Chairman C. Vernon Gray says that "all African-Americans are living black history."It's an important point to ponder now, during Black History Month.The important contribution of Africans to the vigorous growth of the United States is becoming better known through this yearly celebration.Researcher and re-enactor Houston D. Wedlock, a resident of Oakland Mills, tells of the Buffalo Soldiers, the black troops in the segregated Army who helped open up the West and fought with distinction, although they were denied many of the rights and privileges accorded white soldiers.
NEWS
By Joe Murray | March 22, 1996
ANGELINA COUNTY, Texas -- During the first half of my life, the way things were:1. If you didn't go to church, you were going to Hell.2. You didn't dare say anything against segregation.3. If you were liberal, they called you a commie.4. Abortion was against the law no ifs, ands or buts.5. Movies, radio and TV were totally controlled by censorship.6. America was a Christian, God-fearing nation.7. A single marijuana cigarette was enough to send you to prison.8. A baby born out of wedlock was a horrible sin for which there was no forgiveness.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1996
They traveled across the Western frontier, fighting rustlers and bandits to protect the nation's territories. But Houston Douglas Wedlock's great-great-uncle and other Buffalo Soldiers never reached most American history books.To correct that, Mr. Wedlock of Columbia's Long Reach village offers educational programs about his uncle, Charles Davis, and other members of the decorated all-black cavalry and infantry units.The trucking company safety manager is the only Howard County member of the Baltimore chapter of the Buffalo Soldiers Association.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | May 22, 1992
Every time I think life is getting too complicated, I just listen to Dan Quayle and learn how simple-minded it really is.I had been trying to understand the causes of the violence in Los Angeles. Was it just the result of thieves and thugs? Or were there serious underlying social problems?Our vice president has now supplied the answer: Murphy Brown did it.As you probably know, Dan Quayle recently gave a speech blaming the Los Angeles rioting on the breakdown of the American family and the abandonment of traditional values as typified by Murphy Brown "bearing a child alone and calling it just another 'lifestyle choice.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1996
They traveled across the Western frontier, fighting rustlers and bandits to protect the nation's territories. But Houston Douglas Wedlock's great-great-uncle and other Buffalo Soldiers never reached most American history books.To correct that, Mr. Wedlock of Columbia's Long Reach village offers educational programs about his uncle, Charles Davis, and other members of the decorated all-black cavalry and infantry units.The trucking company safety manager is the only Howard County member of the Baltimore chapter of the Buffalo Soldiers Association.
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