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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2012
After spending Saturday night listening to and writing about a Baltimore blogger who webcast and tweeted throughout a five-hour standoff with a police S.W.A.T. unit, I promised myself at least 24 hours to try and coherently think through the meaning of the event. Beyond the things I said Saturday night about the webcast and Twitter conversation being two more great examples of the way the Internet and social media continue to change so many aspects of American life, there are a couple of other media takeaways that stay with me and are worth thinking about.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2013
Comet ISON's journey from outside the solar system toward the sun reaches its crescendo Thursday, and you can follow along live through a NASA live webcast. The comet will pass less than 700,000 miles from the sun's surface. Scientists and amateur astronomers will be paying close attention to any available observations of the comet to see if it survives its first close encounter with a star. If it stays together, it could mean some spectacular skywatching in December. But it's possible that the comet's nucleus of dust and ice could break into pieces or disintegrate.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,sun reporter | November 27, 2006
Maryland's highest court is poised to begin live Webcasting of its oral arguments, making the staid proceedings widely and immediately available for the first time to people outside its Annapolis courtroom. The first Webcast is tentatively planned Thursday -- in time to iron out kinks for arguments in a case involving gay marriage Dec. 4. With interest groups and constituencies on both sides of the issue, that case is expected to draw a bevy of viewers, unlike most other cases. "It's all part of this outreach thing," said Chief Judge Robert M. Bell, referring to the judiciary's push for heightened visibility and greater public education about what courts do. "Other courts have done it. I don't see why we shouldn't do it," said Bell, referring to the Court of Appeals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2012
After spending Saturday night listening to and writing about a Baltimore blogger who webcast and tweeted throughout a five-hour standoff with a police S.W.A.T. unit, I promised myself at least 24 hours to try and coherently think through the meaning of the event. Beyond the things I said Saturday night about the webcast and Twitter conversation being two more great examples of the way the Internet and social media continue to change so many aspects of American life, there are a couple of other media takeaways that stay with me and are worth thinking about.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 11, 2006
We're trying to convince kids that food does not come out of a box, and we're trying to encourage families to see cooking not as a chore but as quality time that families can spend together."
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 4, 2006
ABC took a solid first step into the future of TV news yesterday with the debut of the World News Tonight anchor team of Elizabeth Vargas and Bob Woodruff - as well as a new daily Webcast. Vargas, 43, and Woodruff, 44, replace Peter Jennings who died at age 67 in August of lung cancer. The pair was chosen over Jennings' heir apparent, 62-year-old Charles Gibson, as part of a strategy aimed at attracting younger viewers to network news. Yesterday, both their afternoon Webcast and the dinnertime World News Tonight were sure-handed productions that skillfully navigated the currents of a fairly strong news day at home and abroad.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | October 16, 2012
J.K. Rowling doesn't make many public appearances, so tonight's New York City event to publicize her new novel "The Casual Vacancy" is getting a lot of attention. Fellow novelist Ann Patchett will lead a conversation, and there will be a Q&A. If you're not one of the lucky 1,200 or so who scored tickets for the event at Jazz at Lincoln Center's Frederick P. Rose Hall, you can still participate long-distance. Some bookstores will hold public screenings via a live webcast; among those listed A Likely Story Bookstore, 7566 Main Street in Sykesville.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2001
As one of the nation's leading marketing and media research firms begins to trade its stock on the New York Stock Exchange, it is also expanding its Howard County presence into the Gateway office park. Arbitron Inc., best known for its measurement of local radio ratings, has moved into a 20,000- square-foot office on Alexander Bell Drive. The company also has a two-building campus off Snowden River Parkway. The expansion was precipitated by the March 30 reverse spinoff from its parent company Ceridian Corp.
NEWS
November 30, 2006
At 10 this morning, as the court crier says, "All rise, please," and the seven judges of Maryland's Court of Appeals file into the courtroom in Annapolis, anyone with a computer should be able to tune in. The state's highest court is expected to go high-tech today with live Webcasts of oral arguments. The court's online availability is a welcome development in the administration and understanding of justice. Before today, court proceedings were open mainly to whoever could get one of the 90 available seats in the fourth-floor courtroom with historic wood paneling.
NEWS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2004
With a minute to airtime, producer-director Richard Furman peered at a bank of monitors in the control room. "Sinus cam looks gorgeous," he advised his technicians. "Norm," he barked into his headset, "you're live." Norm - Dr. Norman Sanders, medical director of a company that makes surgical devices - was in the operating room at Georgetown University Hospital in surgical scrubs, mask and headset. Laid out before him, however, were not surgical tools but lecture notes. He was host of a live broadcast on the World Wide Web of a tonsillectomy operation using his company's device.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | October 16, 2012
J.K. Rowling doesn't make many public appearances, so tonight's New York City event to publicize her new novel "The Casual Vacancy" is getting a lot of attention. Fellow novelist Ann Patchett will lead a conversation, and there will be a Q&A. If you're not one of the lucky 1,200 or so who scored tickets for the event at Jazz at Lincoln Center's Frederick P. Rose Hall, you can still participate long-distance. Some bookstores will hold public screenings via a live webcast; among those listed A Likely Story Bookstore, 7566 Main Street in Sykesville.
NEWS
September 30, 2010
The transition to college can be an exceedingly difficult time for vulnerable teens, and that's one reason why more than 1,000 suicides occur on college campuses annually. But the death of Tyler Clementi, an 18-year-old freshman at Rutgers University, seems particularly nightmarish, given its technology-assisted circumstances — a moment of intimacy with another man secretly captured by a roommate's webcam and broadcast live on the Internet. Mr. Clementi jumped off the George Washington Bridge on Sept.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | April 23, 2009
Even in the midst of a recession - and within communities of faith, where members pledge to help one another - the last thing people tend to discuss openly, says Bryan Brunelle, is their struggles with money. "People will talk about their sex lives more easily than their financial problems," says Brunelle, a deacon at Central Presbyterian Church in Towson. "It shouldn't be that way in a church community. But it is." So when Brunelle, 30, saw a chance to bring to his 800-member congregation, and to the wider community, a free, interactive, multimedia Webcast on how people should handle personal finances during the recession, it seemed like the answer to a prayer.
NEWS
November 30, 2006
At 10 this morning, as the court crier says, "All rise, please," and the seven judges of Maryland's Court of Appeals file into the courtroom in Annapolis, anyone with a computer should be able to tune in. The state's highest court is expected to go high-tech today with live Webcasts of oral arguments. The court's online availability is a welcome development in the administration and understanding of justice. Before today, court proceedings were open mainly to whoever could get one of the 90 available seats in the fourth-floor courtroom with historic wood paneling.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,sun reporter | November 27, 2006
Maryland's highest court is poised to begin live Webcasting of its oral arguments, making the staid proceedings widely and immediately available for the first time to people outside its Annapolis courtroom. The first Webcast is tentatively planned Thursday -- in time to iron out kinks for arguments in a case involving gay marriage Dec. 4. With interest groups and constituencies on both sides of the issue, that case is expected to draw a bevy of viewers, unlike most other cases. "It's all part of this outreach thing," said Chief Judge Robert M. Bell, referring to the judiciary's push for heightened visibility and greater public education about what courts do. "Other courts have done it. I don't see why we shouldn't do it," said Bell, referring to the Court of Appeals.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 11, 2006
We're trying to convince kids that food does not come out of a box, and we're trying to encourage families to see cooking not as a chore but as quality time that families can spend together."
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2013
Comet ISON's journey from outside the solar system toward the sun reaches its crescendo Thursday, and you can follow along live through a NASA live webcast. The comet will pass less than 700,000 miles from the sun's surface. Scientists and amateur astronomers will be paying close attention to any available observations of the comet to see if it survives its first close encounter with a star. If it stays together, it could mean some spectacular skywatching in December. But it's possible that the comet's nucleus of dust and ice could break into pieces or disintegrate.
NEWS
By CHILDS WALKER and CHILDS WALKER,SUN REPORTER | March 13, 2006
It happens every March. It's early afternoon on a Thursday and one of the first batch of NCAA tournament games comes down to the final seconds. A crowd gathers around the office's lone TV, hanging from the wall in the corner. More cautious souls crane their necks to watch the action from their desks. Keyboards stop clicking. Phones ring unanswered. And college basketball has again halted the wheels of American commerce. Bosses beware, because it's about to get worse. For the first time this year, CBS Sports will offer free, live Internet streams of all tournament games.
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 4, 2006
ABC took a solid first step into the future of TV news yesterday with the debut of the World News Tonight anchor team of Elizabeth Vargas and Bob Woodruff - as well as a new daily Webcast. Vargas, 43, and Woodruff, 44, replace Peter Jennings who died at age 67 in August of lung cancer. The pair was chosen over Jennings' heir apparent, 62-year-old Charles Gibson, as part of a strategy aimed at attracting younger viewers to network news. Yesterday, both their afternoon Webcast and the dinnertime World News Tonight were sure-handed productions that skillfully navigated the currents of a fairly strong news day at home and abroad.
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