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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Oh those mischievous Brenner Brothers! Mike Brenner, the founder of Betamore , a technology incubator and campus in Federal Hill, was named one of the Baltimore Business Journal's " 40 under 40 . " But when it came time for the photo, Mike Brenner's identical twin, Dan Brenner, himself a local tech leader, posed instead. "It was a thoughtful prank," said Mike Brenner in a phone interview (although, frankly, it could have been Dan Brenner on the phone for all we know)
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BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
On one side are technologists, preaching that open access to unlimited Internet bandwidth is the bedrock of innovation for a 21st-century economy - and is under threat. On the other are telecommunications giants that say they are equally committed to an unrestricted Internet but face the challenge of squeezing more and more streamed movies and cable show binges through networks they constantly must beef up. In the middle, regulators are refereeing a debate that could come to yet another tipping point this month.
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BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
On one side are technologists, preaching that open access to unlimited Internet bandwidth is the bedrock of innovation for a 21st-century economy - and is under threat. On the other are telecommunications giants that say they are equally committed to an unrestricted Internet but face the challenge of squeezing more and more streamed movies and cable show binges through networks they constantly must beef up. In the middle, regulators are refereeing a debate that could come to yet another tipping point this month.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Oh those mischievous Brenner Brothers! Mike Brenner, the founder of Betamore , a technology incubator and campus in Federal Hill, was named one of the Baltimore Business Journal's " 40 under 40 . " But when it came time for the photo, Mike Brenner's identical twin, Dan Brenner, himself a local tech leader, posed instead. "It was a thoughtful prank," said Mike Brenner in a phone interview (although, frankly, it could have been Dan Brenner on the phone for all we know)
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Moran and John Moran,HARTFORD COURANT | July 11, 2004
For most of us, the World Wide Web is worldwide in name only. The vast majority of Web sites we visit are in the United States. Occasionally, we might happen onto a site in Canada or England, or perhaps an English-language newspaper in some other country. So it might come as a surprise to learn that non-English-speaking parts of the Internet are soaring in popularity. The dot-com boom may be only a memory here, but it's just getting started internationally. Yet as recent business deals show, this phenomenon is well known to big Web businesses.
BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 28, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Under fire for allegedly blocking a popular software program for watching video online, Comcast Corp. pledged yesterday not to discriminate against specific technology as it tries to keep increasing amounts of data flowing through its cable networks. But the move may not be enough to keep Comcast, the country's largest cable company, from being disciplined by federal regulators. It also may not be enough to resolve a complicated debate about how Internet providers can manage their online traffic.
BUSINESS
By Jessica Guynn and Jessica Guynn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 29, 2008
SAN FRANCISCO -- Silicon Valley entrepreneur Sramana Mitra captured a common sentiment in the title of a blog post last week: "Yahoo, Please Put Up a Fight." As its growth slows, Yahoo Inc. has taken steps to reorganize its management structure, narrow its focus and jettison some underperforming businesses. But it's still being outmatched in search advertising dollars by Google Inc. and in user growth by social networks such as Facebook Inc., which are rapidly gaining members and advertisers.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2009
Retail Web sites have seen large increases in traffic because holiday shoppers stayed home in large areas of the East Coast because of the weather. The weekend before Christmas is one of the busiest of the year, but snow that stretched from the Carolinas to New England closed malls and kept shoppers off treacherous roads. Web retailers saw heavy traffic during the weekend. On Friday and Saturday, online sales rose 24 percent from the same days last year, Web research company Coremetrics said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tyche Hendricks and Tyche Hendricks,SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER | June 22, 1998
Sex is definitely a hot topic on the Internet, but the Web is not breeding a generation of sex addicts, according to a new study by Stanford researcher Alvin Cooper.Instead, Cooper found, Web surfers are looking for a little cybersex entertainment, and the anonymity of the Internet lets them feel more comfortable exploring sexual topics."It's not like the Web is this irresistible sexual magnet, where people who venture in are going to get trapped," he said. "Most people use it for sexual purposes in a recreational way," much as they might watch "Baywatch" or flip through a Playboy magazine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | September 12, 2011
To the readers, It's been a fun six months here at the Ridiculous Report, but it's time to sign off. I'm going back to being a full-time reporter focusing on local issues and won't have much time for musings on the various national political items of the day. That means less time spent on Sarah Palin and Joe Biden jokes, and more time rooting out untold stories in Baltimore. On the blog, I've done my best to be fair and independent and point out silliness on both the left and the right.
BUSINESS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 28, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Under fire for allegedly blocking a popular software program for watching video online, Comcast Corp. pledged yesterday not to discriminate against specific technology as it tries to keep increasing amounts of data flowing through its cable networks. But the move may not be enough to keep Comcast, the country's largest cable company, from being disciplined by federal regulators. It also may not be enough to resolve a complicated debate about how Internet providers can manage their online traffic.
BUSINESS
By Jessica Guynn and Jessica Guynn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 29, 2008
SAN FRANCISCO -- Silicon Valley entrepreneur Sramana Mitra captured a common sentiment in the title of a blog post last week: "Yahoo, Please Put Up a Fight." As its growth slows, Yahoo Inc. has taken steps to reorganize its management structure, narrow its focus and jettison some underperforming businesses. But it's still being outmatched in search advertising dollars by Google Inc. and in user growth by social networks such as Facebook Inc., which are rapidly gaining members and advertisers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Moran and John Moran,HARTFORD COURANT | July 11, 2004
For most of us, the World Wide Web is worldwide in name only. The vast majority of Web sites we visit are in the United States. Occasionally, we might happen onto a site in Canada or England, or perhaps an English-language newspaper in some other country. So it might come as a surprise to learn that non-English-speaking parts of the Internet are soaring in popularity. The dot-com boom may be only a memory here, but it's just getting started internationally. Yet as recent business deals show, this phenomenon is well known to big Web businesses.
BUSINESS
October 28, 1998
Comcast Cablevision of Maryland LP is expected to announce today the creation of 80 jobs at its national call center in White Marsh. The jobs would support customer assistance for the cable television company's Comcastome Internet access service.Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and Baltimore County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger are to attend a ribbon-cutting at the call center this morning.Comcast, which sells cable service to more than 300,000 customers in Howard, Harford and Baltimore counties, opened the call center Jan. 23. The unit initially employed 40 people.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | July 30, 2012
Sometimes the Amazon robots get a little wacky with their book recommendations for readers. The bots must get rusty from all of the rain out in Seattle. Read Street reader Eileen O'Brien recently got some weird suggestions for mysteries and thrillers, when the bots listed several books by Baltimore novelist Anne Tyler. Among them: "Breathing Lessons" and "Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant. " Maybe the bots confused Tyler's "The Beginner's Goodbye" with Raymond Chandler's "The Long Goodbye," but I'm flummoxed about the others.
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