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By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | January 12, 1997
MY FRIEND Richard bought a computer three years ago, and he's still satisfied with it. Or he was until a month ago when he finally decided it was time to surf the Web and signed up with an Internet provider."
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NEWS
January 22, 2014
I was amazed by The Sun's story on Sunday about the wrong phone number on the state's health care website ( "Latest glitch on health exchange," Jan. 19). Not that mistakes on websites don't occur - we're all human - but that this one has yet to be fixed, many days after it was reported. I manage the websites of several non-profits and take care of ordinary mistakes like that in 10 minutes. Even in the federal government, where I used to develop web content, typos on web pages were routinely fixed within a day. Is nobody minding the store at the Maryland health exchange?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | May 22, 2003
ANYONE MY age who spends time browsing the Web knows there's a cultural war going on that has nothing to do with the usual subjects - politics, race, sex, and religion. It's a more subtle struggle between those of us who wear reading glasses and those who don't. People who can still read fine print without assistance tend to be the ones who design Web pages. Unfortunately, the folks who do wear glasses have to read them. And increasingly, the type is too darn small. As a surfer, you're supposed to solve this problem by changing the size of the type displayed on your screen.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
A meeting of Morgan State University's Board of Regents planned for Thursday afternoon has been cancelled, university officials said. The meeting had been announced on the board's web page, but the notice was later removed. The purpose of the meeting had not been made public. Morgan was plunged into turmoil last month when the board voted 8-7 to seek a replacement for president David J. Wilson when his contract expires at the end of the academic year. Students, faculty and alumni rallied to support Wilson.
NEWS
June 28, 2000
NEIGHBORHOOD Web pages are a dime a dozen these days in the metropolitan area. But Bolton Hill's redesigned electronic town crier is so good its ideas merit consideration -- and copying -- by other communities. Most neighborhood Web pages have two problems: Their information is either too skimpy or too stale to be useful. This was the case with boltonhill.org, too, until the site was redesigned recently. The new version, which is still being perfected, provides the most functional neighborhood clearinghouse we have seen in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | June 23, 1997
Beneath the waters of Loch Raven Reservoir stands a ruined castle -- to find out why it's there and who lived in it, just dial up the Baltimore County library's World Wide Web page and click on the item labeled "Castle Under the Lake."And among the legends of Lansdowne are stories of the Underground Railroad that carried slaves to freedom; to read them, call up the same page and click an item from the Arbutus library.These tidbits are among thousands of items of Baltimore County history available through the county library system's rapidly expanding Web page, said Jason Domasky, a library technology specialist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2002
If you're part Ansel Adams and part Andy Warhol, the step-by-step, beginner-oriented tools for building a Web page at AOL Hometown or Yahoo! GeoCities may not provide enough oomph for you to express yourself. But with some cash and a willingness to immerse yourself in a manual, you can step up to dedicated Web development software. Most of the programs offer "WYSIWYG" environments, which means you can lay out the Web pages visually so that what-you-see-is-what-you-get. No coding or knowledge of HTML (the Web's design language)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Gillmor and Dan Gillmor,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 15, 1999
There you are, browsing through an online bookstore -- say, Amazon.com. You spot a volume that looks interesting. You're tempted to click the shopping-cart icon to order the book, but first you wait for a clever piece of software to do its thing.Does it ever. A little window pops up on your screen. In the background the software has been checking prices, availability and delivery time at other online booksellers, and it's found a better deal for the book somewhere else. Are you sure you want to buy from Amazon?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,sun staff | April 19, 1999
English speakers prowling cyberspace for news from Yugoslavia are learning the hard way that it isn't called the World Wide Web for nothing.Erin Barclay is one of them. The head of a Washington, D.C., nonprofit with ties to the Balkans, Barclay trolls the Net daily for whatever scraps of news she can find from the war-torn region. Much is in English. But the most revealing dispatches, she knows, probably aren't."There's been e-mails in Serbo-Croatian that are lost on me," says Barclay, executive director of the Network of East-West Women.
NEWS
By Jennifer Vick and Jennifer Vick,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | March 3, 1997
A pair of computer-animated, wandering eyes encourages young readers to look at Mona Kerby's Web site, "The Author Corner: Mid-Atlantic Authors."The site introduces middle school students to mid-Atlantic authors and illustrators of children's books. Kerby, an assistant professor of library science at Western Maryland College, is among them."I did this for the sheer love of it. When you've been a teacher for so long, you're always looking for ways to make students read," said Kerby, a teacher at Western Maryland College for three years.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2010
There's one question that makes me cringe and instantly start doing the la-la-la, I-can't-hear-you thing with my ears: "Can I tell you how I really feel?" No, dear God, no! Anything but that! It's not that I don't care what other people think. In fact, being a reporter, I've spent a good deal of my life asking people what they think about something. (Well, usually I'm asking what they know, but people generally want to tell you what they think — big difference.)
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | July 3, 2008
My daughter was married recently and we have pictures that relatives would like us to share. How can we send lots of pictures over the Internet and not sacrifice quality? - Ted Pilch Put all the photos on a Web page. Instead of sending out a flood of photos, you can send a link to the page. The beauty of using a Web page is that you can combine other features, such as a guest book where folks can comment. I use a commercial Web site (one that I pay for) and a free personal Web space that comes with one of my too-many Internet accounts.
BUSINESS
August 15, 2007
Nation : Technology Microsoft issues security patches Microsoft Corp. issued fixes for nine security flaws, including four meant to keep hackers from breaking into computers through Web pages, during a regularly scheduled update yesterday. Microsoft gave the four Web browsing-related patches its most severe "critical" rating. The updates affect many versions of Windows, Server and Office software - including Windows XP and Windows Vista - and are meant to prevent hackers from breaking into Web surfers' computers using specially crafted Web pages.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | May 17, 2007
When it comes to security on the Web, we still may be our own worst enemies. For years, millions of us clicked blindly on inviting but booby-trapped e-mail attachments, launching malicious programs that trashed hard drives, paralyzed networks and otherwise made lives miserable. When we finally got wise to the dangers of unsolicited e-mail, the nature of the threats changed in form and purpose. Some are now aimed at stealing credit-card numbers, bank account information, Social Security numbers and ultimately, our identities.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | March 29, 2007
When we installed one of the first commercial porn filters on a PC almost a decade ago, its attempts to clean up the Web were often hilarious. It refused to display the home page of the Essex Branch of the Baltimore County Public Library because Essex contains the letters "s-e-x." The same ban applied to Web pages with references to Wessex, Sussex, Middlesex, and similarly named centers of hot-blooded iniquity. Ditto for news sites covering the special prosecutor's report on the Clinton-Lewinsky sex scandal, and the American Cancer Society's Web pages on breast cancer, which contained another no-no word: "breast."
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | March 22, 2007
Some users of MySpace feel as if their space is being invaded. MySpace.com, the Web's largest social network, has gradually been imposing limits on the software tools that users can embed in their pages, like music and video players that also deliver advertising or enable transactions. At stake is the ability of MySpace, which is owned by News Corp., to ensure that it alone can commercially capitalize on its 90 million visitors each month. But to some formerly enthusiastic MySpace users, the restrictions hamper their abilities to design pages and promote new projects.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2010
There's one question that makes me cringe and instantly start doing the la-la-la, I-can't-hear-you thing with my ears: "Can I tell you how I really feel?" No, dear God, no! Anything but that! It's not that I don't care what other people think. In fact, being a reporter, I've spent a good deal of my life asking people what they think about something. (Well, usually I'm asking what they know, but people generally want to tell you what they think — big difference.)
FEATURES
By GEOFFREY C. UPTON and GEOFFREY C. UPTON,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 29, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Until Monica Lewinsky emerged yesterday from weeks of obscurity, there wasn't much going on in front of her lawyers' office building at 1100 Connecticut Ave. N.W. For weeks, as America's favorite former intern remained ensconced in California, news cameramen moved their stakeouts elsewhere, and life pretty much returned to normal.Yet throughout the lull, some of the most rabid Monica junkies managed to keep up hope of catching a glimpse of her by viewing the building via a "Monicacam" on the World Wide Web. Roughly 500 times a day, someone visited the page -- www.webdevs.
BUSINESS
By JIM COATES and JIM COATES,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 6, 2006
My laptop is about a year old and is be- coming slower and slower. I have heard people say that I need to delete things such as temporary Internet files, but I don't know how to safely do this. Can you give me any assistance? - Lynn Harron You heard right about how purging those temporary Internet files can put a bit of pep back in the old processors, so here is that drill: Open your Microsoft Internet Explorer Web browser and then click on the item Tools at the top of the display. Then scroll down to Internet Options and select the tab General in the menu that appears.
ENTERTAINMENT
By TIMMY SAMUEL and TIMMY SAMUEL,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | January 26, 2006
Apple Computer Inc. CEO Steve Jobs traditionally uses the annual Macworld Conference & Expo to introduce his company's latest and greatest hardware and software - and this year was no exception. Jobs' big news at the show, held Jan. 9-13 at San Francisco's Moscone Center, was that Apple's previously announced move to Intel processors would be much sooner than expected. He said the first Macintosh computers using the processor, the iMac and MacBook Pro, will be available in January and February, respectively - a full six months ahead of schedule.
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