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NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 2, 1998
THE OWNER of Designed Fibers at Savage Mill, Margaret Vigneulle, has an interesting project in mind.Vigneulle is a professional weaver with a shop at Savage Mill. Some time ago, she saw a performance artist use weaving as a medium in a creative public demonstration and was impressed.The artist strung warp threads (those that are extended lengthwise on a loom) across trees in a mall and, while folks watched, wove the weft threads through, making a tapestry in the center of the mall.Vigneulle was taken with the idea, but she wanted to include the community more actively in an event.
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NEWS
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The rigor required to create a Nantucket lightship basket puts the lie to any cheap jokes about learning the craft. “If these baskets are made perfectly,” says Leslie Goldsmith, “they should be able to hold water.” Consumers today associate the baskets “with the oval purses and a lid,” Goldsmith says. But she and her fellow weavers in the Nantucket Basket Guild are drawn to the historical legacy and precision of the craft. “These baskets are made the same way sailors made them in the 1800s,” she says.
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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | January 11, 1994
An article and headline about the Starting Point rehabilitation program in yesterday's Carroll and Howard editions indicated that its clients are patients at Springfield Hospital Center. Starting Point leases space from the hospital, but is an independent, nonprofit agency.The Sun regrets the error.Hunched over the loom, weaving a purple, blue, brown and rose-colored wall hanging, William Albaugh explains the complexities of the craft."It takes a lot of coordination, and you've got to watch whatyou're doing so that you make a good project," said Mr. Albaugh, a patient at Starting Point, a residential and rehabilitation program for the chronically mentally ill at Springfield Hospital Center in Sykesville.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
The Civil War experience has been preserved over the past 150 years through a variety of media: books, newspaper accounts, films, drawings, paintings, diaries ... and fabrics. Columbia resident Mavis Slawson has made the latter her specialty as a textile historian and docent at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in Frederick. She often gives presentations about the role of textiles in the Civil War, examining their role not only as practical materials but also in conveying and preserving culture across the battlefield.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | July 15, 2007
Deb May leaned back to survey her work, a neat row of orange and brown wool tightly wrapped around a piece of wood. Did it look right? Would there be enough to make a knot and then warp the other side of the loom? "You have to just trust," said one of her classmates in the Navajo -- or Din? -- weaving class at Common Ground on the Hill. "I'm not that trusting," May said. An experienced weaver, May's uncertainty came from tackling a loom unlike her own -- and an equally unfamiliar technique.
FEATURES
By Elaine Markoutsas | August 18, 1991
The basic process of weaving fabrics, the interlacing ofhorizontal threads over vertical ones, hasn't changed much since the invention of the loom.What's new is the way some textile designers are changing the face of fabric: They are rethinking the way threads are dyed or put together, the design of the pattern and even how a fabric might be embellished -- with everything from rhinestones to embroidery.Color, pattern, weight, texture and touch are what grab our attention when we shop for fabrics, whether in clothing, upholstery, drapery, tablecloths or bed linens.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 2, 2005
Barbara Stam worked the treadle of her floor loom so fluidly that it looked as though she were dancing. Nancy Spies picked up a bag and pulled out an intricately woven thin purple band brocaded in gold that she reproduced from a 500-year-old pattern. Lizanne Smith described her captivation with the mathematics and machinery associated with textile weaving. Although these women have diverse interests and use different techniques, they share a common bond as members of Fallston's Warped Weavers Guild, a group of hobbyist weavers that formed in 1974 to foster the art of hand-weaving.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | May 28, 1993
A venerable downtown cloth weaving business seemed headed for the rag pile until Helen Sarafidis came along.This resourceful woman has given her Baltimore Weaving a new life in new quarters in upper Fells Point.Thanks to the care and patience of her staff, many a prized overcoat, pair of pants or cherished tablecloth is almost as good as new."People are so relieved to find out that this nearly extinct service is still available," she says at the cozy neighborhood shop she opened at 2029 Bank St. several months ago.She rescued a specialty business established in 1919 in the 200 block of W. Saratoga St.That firm, something of a downtown landmark, was known as Reliable Weaving.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2004
Mary Elizabeth Brown, a retired librarian for the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory who also raised sheep and sheared their wool for weaving projects, died of complications from cancer Saturday at Mercy Medical Center. The Ten Hills resident was 70. Born Mary Elizabeth Bomberger in Washington, she was raised in Alaska while her father served in the Civilian Conservation Corps. She earned a degree in geography from the University of Maryland, College Park, where she also took theater courses.
NEWS
By Amy P. Ingram and Amy P. Ingram,Contributing Writer | December 8, 1993
When you've earned the nickname Mrs. Crafty, you'll go pretty far to hone your skills. Even to the point of standing knee-deep in sheep.Friends and students of Evelyn Garbe weren't surprised when the 79-year-old Odenton resident moved to her Vermont farm for 10 summers to raise the fuzzy animals just to find out how "all that weaving wool was made," she said.Mrs. Garbe, who teaches weaving, quilting and lacing to area seniors at the O'Malley Senior Center, said she wanted to learn the entire process of making a wool sweater -- from raising the animal to sewing on the last button.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Krishana Davis | December 10, 2012
This week's episode starts in the middle of last week's blowup between Kim and the rest of the girls. Kim makes up an excuse to the other housewives that she cannot attend the couples trip to Anguilla because of her pregnancy. After NeNe and Kandi call Kim out on her serial excuses, she storms out of the restaurant and Kroy comes to her rescue. Kim and Kroy are outside of the restaurant cussing and fussing at the camera men and the rest of the housewives realize that Kim's focus is now on her and her family and she no longer has any regard for her friends.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
Outhouses. Potbellied stoves. Four-mile walks in the snow. These are legacies of the Rosenwald Schools. For the past several weeks, county students have been studying the schools, a loosely affiliated network for African-American children that a white businessman, Julius Rosenwald, helped start with a grant in 1917. Twenty-three would spring up in Anne Arundel County alone. But what fascinated history students at North County High School in Glen Burnie and Southern High School in Harwood were the minutiae -- where children went to the bathroom, how they stayed warm and got to school, and what their classrooms looked like.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
Lynn Zwerling speaks of knitting the way others talk about yoga or long distance running or even particularly potent cocktails. It's life-changing, she'll say. Mind-altering. Zen. The Columbia retiree doesn't care if she's making a hat, a sweater or a scarf. It's just the way she loses herself in the lightly clicking needles, plush wool and repetitive motion. Zwerling, who's 67, took up knitting after retiring from selling cars, quickly becoming an evangelist, more enthusiastic than skilled.
EXPLORE
By Sara Toth | October 4, 2011
History and present day are interwoven along the train tracks of the old B&O Railroad in Ellicott City. The ruins of Hell House, an old seminary, and the railroad itself are full of stories, and Columbia writer Jamie Wasserman has added one more tale to the list. Wasserman, 37, capitalizes on the haunting, magical qualities of the historic mill town in his book “Blood and Sunlight: A Maryland Vampire Story.” A fan of vampire lore long before the phenomenon of Stephenie Meyer's  “Twilight” series, Wasserman saw his story as a way to bring together two things he loved dearly: the vampire mythology and his teenage stomping grounds of Ellicott City.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2011
Two of the most important car owners in the IZOD IndyCar Series, Roger Penske and Chip Ganassi, sat beside each other Saturday afternoon to discuss the rivalry between their teams as the IndyCar season heads toward its finish. Penske's Will Power and Ganassi's Dario Franchitti are locked in another tight points battle. Franchitti has the 26 point lead going in to Sunday's Baltimore Grand Prix, but Penske said that might be the key to Power winning the title. "We've had the lead in the past two seasons and lost both of them," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2011
For actor Hugo Weaving, the distance between his farm in Sydney, Australia and Los Angeles isn't just 7,500 miles, give or take. It's the distance between his identities as a pop culture icon and as a conservatory-trained actor who revels in the classical canon. Both of Weaving's faces are on prominent display in the Baltimore area this month. As a cartoon villain with inverted facial features in a red rubber mask, Weaver is stomping around the screen in the dozens of movie theaters where "Captain America" is now showing.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | March 25, 2008
A speeding car weaving between lanes on southbound U.S. 29 crossed the median south of Columbia and collided with a northbound car yesterday, sending both drivers to Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore. Howard County police said an officer in an unmarked police car saw a 1993 Toyota Paseo speeding and weaving between lanes on U.S. 29 at 2:40 p.m. The officer tried to stop the vehicle, but the driver sped up, police said. As the Paseo's driver approached Rivers Edge Road, south of Route 32, the vehicle suddenly changed lanes, skidding across the grassy median and into the northbound lanes, where it was struck by a 2000 Toyota Camry driven by Joshua Jacobs, 39, of the 6100 block of Rusk Ave. in Baltimore.
NEWS
January 5, 2007
Fiber art -- Slayton House in Wilde Lake Village Center will present a group exhibit, FABrications: New Work from the Fiber Artists of Baltimore, from Thursday through Feb. 10. Members of the FAB group work in quilting, weaving, book-making, embroidery and other media. A reception, with refreshments and music, is planned from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Jan. 14. Gallery hours are from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. 410-730-3987.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun staff report | July 28, 2011
M&T Bank will be a sponsor of the inaugural Baltimore Grand Prix, race organizers announced this morning. M&T becomes the first bank to join as a sponsor and the deal includes signs on the race course and green flags to be given to fans near the start/finish line, among other promotions. "We are very excited to have M&T Bank as one of our sponsors," Jay Davidson, president and CEO of the Baltimore Grand Prix, said in a news release. "This partnership is significant as it ties one of our leading institutions into this new and exciting event for our city.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2011
She remembers having "wonderful" history teachers growing up in 1940s and 1950s Annapolis, and she has explored and chronicled this area's past for more than 40 years. But as historian Jane Wilson McWilliams researched her massive, colorful and comprehensive new book, "Annapolis: City on the Severn," she sometimes found herself stunned to encounter truths about her hometown she'd never run across. If you did your high school history homework, for instance, you know the 15th Amendment to the Constitution (passed in 1870)
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