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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
The Weather Channel's plans announced Tuesday to assign names to winter storms in the same way as hurricanes may have stirred a debate among weather forecasters. AccuWeather.com has released a statement criticizing the move. Henry Margusity, AccuWeather's lead severe weather forecaster, had poked some holes in the plan on Twitter on Tuesday, but the statement released Wednesday comes from the weather service's founder and president. “In unilaterally deciding to name winter storms, The Weather Channel has confused media spin with science and public safety and is doing a disservice to the field of meteorology and public service,” Joel N. Myers said in the statement.  “We have explored this issue for 20 years,” he continued, “and have found that this is not good science and importantly will actually mislead the public.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
On Wednesday, Baltimore will relaunch its publicly owned TV station, shifting its focus from broadcasts of government meetings to CharmTV, a showcase for city restaurants, businesses and neighborhoods. City leaders see an opportunity to counteract negative perceptions of Baltimore, but with the change come questions about significantly increased spending on an untested business model - without benefit of data to show how many people watch the station. An extensive publicity campaign from the Mayor's Office of Cable and Communications promises a fresh slate of four locally produced prime-time programs equal in quality to those seen on the Food Network or HGTV, showcasing "all that is proud, inspiring and authentic" about Baltimore food, nightlife, neighborhoods and history.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2012
The massive snowstorm that blanketed Baltimore and much of the northeast in February 2010 garnered the name "Snowmageddon" from social media users suffering from extreme cabin fever. This winter, how about storms named Brutus, Iago, Helen or even Q? Those are some of the names on a list the Weather Channel released Tuesday to assign to snow and ice storms during winter 2012-2013. The channel created the list to "better communicate the threat and the timing of the significant impacts that accompany these events," according to a post on its website . Weather Channel forecasters plan to name systems no more than three days before they are expected to impact major urban areas.
SPORTS
By Cody Goodwin, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Owen Daniels remembers one of the first times he went on camera to deliver the weather. For a guy who makes his living on the football field, it was a nerve-racking experience. Like most first-timers, he said, he butchered his performance, blaming it, in part, on the lack of a teleprompter. But he improved with practice and discovered that his career in the NFL could open doors to experience the world of meteorology, his other passion. Before Super Bowl XLVIII earlier this year, Daniels, a 6-foot-3, 249-pound, two-time Pro Bowl tight end who signed with the Ravens in early April, didn't strap on his pads to play in the big game, as he definitely would have preferred.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
The forecasts say 4 inches of snow are expected, but be prepared for a blizzard -- Jim Cantore is coming. The Weather Channel meteorologist, whose Twitter bio says he is "[a]lways awaiting mother natures latest temper tantrum", plans to do morning live shots from Baltimore, he said on the microblogging website Monday afternoon. Cantore is known for coming to town any time extreme weather strikes.  Of course, mayhem doesn't always follow Cantore. He reported from Washington, D.C., last March when the capital city, as well as Baltimore, were forecast to get hit with a snowstorm dubbed by many the "Snowquester".
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | November 24, 2005
If you want to know what frightens senior citizens more than anything else in this country, it's not complex Medicare rules or rising prescription costs or pension problems. It's the Weather Channel. The Weather Channel's new logo is: "Bringing Weather to Life." But it really should be: "Proudly Scaring the Hell out of People Since 1982." The fact is, we've become a nation fixated on the weather. And no demographic group is more fixated than senior citizens. Apparently, if you're 65 or older, you're required by law to watch the Weather Channel at least four hours a day. So now, besides being terrified by the weather forecast for their own area, seniors can be terrified by the weather forecast for everywhere else in the country, too. This is why senior citizens should not be allowed to watch the Weather Channel.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Kolbert and Elizabeth Kolbert,New York Times News Service | February 15, 1993
A cold front is bearing down on the Northeast like the 82nd Airborne on red alert. Unless something is done about it, it will be here by sunrise. But of course, nothing can be done about it. That is the tragedy, the pathos, the great ineluctable drama of our inconstant climate.And that drama, in turn, is perhaps why we watch the Weather Channel.For more than 10 years, the Weather Channel has been chronicling the vagaries of the jet stream, seven days a week, 24 hours a day, through rain and sleet and snow, heat and humidity and drought.
NEWS
By Matthew Mosk and Matthew Mosk,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1999
ST. CROIX RIVER, Maine -- Stephen Cobb has one eye on the sky as he leans forward in his canoe and dips his paddle into the warm currents that twist deep into this state's vast wilderness.As a bald eagle glides by and loons call in the distance, this 50-year-old river guide is worrying about the onset of a summer storm."That's called a sun dog," he says, pointing to the ring of haze around the late afternoon sun. "That means there's moisture in the upper atmosphere, and we can expect some rain tomorrow."
NEWS
July 14, 2006
Did you know?-- The heat index is the temperature the body feels when heat and humidity are combined. - The Weather Channel
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | November 13, 2006
Paula from Pikesville watches the Weather Channel way too much. She notices stuff like the local air-quality descriptor at the bottom of the screen. After a day and a half of rain recently, the adjective was still "moderate." So Paula asks: "Shouldn't the rain have washed all the pollution out?" Logic and my experts say yes. But the Weather Channel folks say they're measuring particulate pollution. It could rise after a storm as dirty new air blows in. Besides, they say, "Moderate isn't much worse than low."
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
Enjoy a mild weekend ahead while you can -- temperatures 20 degrees below normal or colder are expected across the eastern United States by late next week. The U.S. Climate Prediction Center in College Park is calling for strong chances, nearly a certainty, that colder-than-normal temperatures will descend on much of the country, from the northern Plains to the Great Lakes to the Mississippi Valley, the mid-Atlantic and New England. It is the result of a strong ridge of high pressure forecast to develop over the western U.S., according to the Weather Underground's Jeff Masters , while cold air spills southward across the rest of the country.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
The forecasts say 4 inches of snow are expected, but be prepared for a blizzard -- Jim Cantore is coming. The Weather Channel meteorologist, whose Twitter bio says he is "[a]lways awaiting mother natures latest temper tantrum", plans to do morning live shots from Baltimore, he said on the microblogging website Monday afternoon. Cantore is known for coming to town any time extreme weather strikes.  Of course, mayhem doesn't always follow Cantore. He reported from Washington, D.C., last March when the capital city, as well as Baltimore, were forecast to get hit with a snowstorm dubbed by many the "Snowquester".
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2013
The National Weather Service has issued a fire weather watch across Central Maryland for Wednesday, warning of a risk of wildfire spread. With relative humidity down around 25 percent, gusty winds up to 30 mph and dry brush and twigs, the advisory is in effect from Wednesday morning through Wednesday evening. "OPEN BURNING OF ANY TYPE IS CONSIDERED VERY HAZARDOUS THIS TIME OF  YEAR," an earlier special statement cautioned. "ACCIDENTAL ESCAPED DEBRIS BURNS ARE THE NUMBER ONE CAUSE OF  WILDFIRES.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2013
I'm not keen on anthropomorphizing nature, a tendency best left to nineteenth-century poets: Shelley, Wordsworth, that element.  So I grit my teeth and endure the National Weather Service's practice of naming tropical storms and hurricanes. It's a well-established tradition, and at least the weather service has started using male as well as female names, and the Associated Press Stylebook  has long since frowned on calling storms and ships "she. "* But the Weather Channel's whim to name winter storms, including the one buffeting the Northeast today, strikes me as a crass and inept attempt to gin up publicity for itself while whipping up public excitement over the weather.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2012
Yesterday, I sent this message to the newsroom staff: We will not be using the word “Frankenstorm” in coverage of Hurricane Sandy, because the term trivializes a serious and potentially deadly event. It's acceptable in direct quotes, but even there we shouldn't overdo it. In doing so, we were following the lead of Phil Blanchard at Testy Copy Editors, who had posted that advice on Facebook, and CNN, which had adopted the same policy. The advisory to the staff was not a flat ban, as you see from the mention of quotes, and Frankenstorm is a word that people are using, and using as an SEO term to find information.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2012
The Weather Channel's plans announced Tuesday to assign names to winter storms in the same way as hurricanes may have stirred a debate among weather forecasters. AccuWeather.com has released a statement criticizing the move. Henry Margusity, AccuWeather's lead severe weather forecaster, had poked some holes in the plan on Twitter on Tuesday, but the statement released Wednesday comes from the weather service's founder and president. “In unilaterally deciding to name winter storms, The Weather Channel has confused media spin with science and public safety and is doing a disservice to the field of meteorology and public service,” Joel N. Myers said in the statement.  “We have explored this issue for 20 years,” he continued, “and have found that this is not good science and importantly will actually mislead the public.
NEWS
January 6, 1991
Clearview CATV Inc. has increased its basic rate to $15.95. Clearview's basic rate offers viewers 32 channels, including Turner Network Television (TNT), which was added Jan. 4.Clearview also has upgraded The Weather Channel to include Baltimore area radar coverage and more detailed local weather information on a 24-hour basis.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | April 24, 1991
One look at its anchor team lets you know that Channel 45 (WBFF) is going to take a different tack when it puts on its 10 o'clock news.In a city where the memory of years of ratings domination by gray-haired Jerry Turner is still affecting hiring and firing decisions, Fox-affiliated Channel 45 is going with a cast that looks like a new version of "The Rookies."The oldest member of the station's weekday and weekend anchor teams, who were introduced to the press yesterday, is 35. The two main co-anchors are 30 and 33. The two weather people are 25 and 28. There won't be too many gray hairs on the station's still-to-be-unveiled set.According to news director Mark Pimentel, who does have a few gray hairs though he's just 34, it's not a matter of age, but of mind-set.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2012
The massive snowstorm that blanketed Baltimore and much of the northeast in February 2010 garnered the name "Snowmageddon" from social media users suffering from extreme cabin fever. This winter, how about storms named Brutus, Iago, Helen or even Q? Those are some of the names on a list the Weather Channel released Tuesday to assign to snow and ice storms during winter 2012-2013. The channel created the list to "better communicate the threat and the timing of the significant impacts that accompany these events," according to a post on its website . Weather Channel forecasters plan to name systems no more than three days before they are expected to impact major urban areas.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2012
McDaniel College may be tucked away in Westminster but boy does the school know how to party. Don't take our word for it -- this is coming directly from Southern Living. The magazine just placed McDaniel on its list of the country's best tailgating schools. And don't take it only from Southern Living. The Weather Channel also ranked McDaniel a heady No. 6 on its best tailgating list. (Who knew the Weather Channel was paying attention to tailgates?) Tailgating is serious business in schools across the country.
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