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By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | October 3, 1991
The grimy back roads and dark byways of South Carolina are the setting for Jon Klein's richly human and funny play "T-Bone N Weasel," running at the Fell's Point Corner Theatre through Oct. 27.Director Susan Kramer has shown a nice perception of life's unfortunate underdogs in this Baltimore premiere production, which is outstanding in both story and performance.The play, first produced in 1986, was featured in the Actors' Theater of Louisville's Humana Festival of New American Plays in 1987.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | July 1, 2009
The relentlessly gimmicky use of 3-D in Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs helps reduce what could have been a genial piece of slapstick into a cartoon that's not just in-your-face, but in-your-eyeballs. You should have been able to treat this film as a grab-bag and pull out some plums. Instead it goes grabbing after you. The film doesn't hurl things at the camera in the manner of Monsters vs. Aliens. But any snout, tongue or tail that lends itself to stretching and snapping gets quite a workout in this movie.
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NEWS
By WILLIAM HYDER and WILLIAM HYDER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 30, 2005
Colorful characters having colorful adventures while traveling: That's the substance of the picaresque novel. The genre dates to Tom Jones, Don Quixote and even earlier books, and it survives in movies like Easy Rider and Midnight Run. T Bone 'N' Weasel, which runs at Rep Stage through Oct. 9, fits comfortably into the picaresque tradition. The play follows a couple of petty criminals as they tour the back roads of the South, sometimes on wheels, sometimes on foot. They run into a variety of people, most of them neither friendly nor helpful.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK | February 5, 2006
SURVIVOR: PEARL ISLANDS PANAMA / / Paramount Home Entertainment / $54.99 The seventh season of the series that vaulted CBS to first place in prime-time ratings and launched an avalanche of reality TV arrives Tuesday in DVD. It wasn't Survivor's greatest season -- which is to say no one got quite as naked or became as detestable as Richard Hatch in season one -- but Pearl Island Panama had its moments. For those not familiar with the series, Survivor features 16 contestants in the wild -- often an island -- competing for a $1 million prize.
NEWS
By Pamela Duncan Edwards | September 19, 1999
Editor's note: A tale of alliteration and three friends that's written by Pamela Duncan Edwards, a featured children's author at next weekend's Baltimore Book Festival.One warm Wednesday morning, the sun winked through Wombat's window and woke her up. "What a wonderful day to wander the world," she thought.Wombat went to ask Weasel and Woodchuck whether they would go with her.So they set to work, wondering what to take with them.Wombat wanted watercress-on-whole-wheat-bread sandwiches, walnut wafers, waffles and whipped cream, wedges of watermelon and her walking stick.
FEATURES
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 17, 1998
Terry Jones' reworking of Kenneth Grahame's 1908 children's classic "The Wind in the Willows" for the screen looks great but plays dull. Rather than zesty and engaging, it comes across as arch and tedious, too often mechanical and lifeless.The precious quality of the film suggests strongly it would have been far better done as animation than live action.One fine day timid Mole (Steve Coogan) finds his comfy, well-appointed subterranean home shaken as if by an earthquake. His pompous, idiotic friend Toad (Jones)
NEWS
July 3, 1993
Aladena FratiannoMafia hit manAladena "Jimmy the Weasel" Fratianno, 79, a longtime Mafia hit man and mob boss before turning FBI informant with a contract on his own head, died peacefully in his sleep Tuesday at his home in an undisclosed U.S. city where he was living under an assumed name.Mr. Fratianno had suffered from Alzheimer's disease.After spending much of his adult life in the mob, he turned government witness in 1977, traveling the country to testify against fellow mobsters and becoming the highest-paid participant in the history of the federal witness protection program.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1996
As 4-year-old Abriam Moore remained unconscious in a downtown hospital yesterday, his family stood near the spot in West Baltimore where he was struck in the head by a stray bullet while riding his bicycle."
SPORTS
By John Steadman | April 10, 1992
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- All those power-conscious spectators, enthralled with men who can make a golf ball travel long distances, follow around after John Daly as if he's an authentic Pied Piper. He has a crowd appeal that is magnetic, considering the fascination that goes with seeing shots that more befit the Aberdeen Proving Ground, where the military tests explosives, than the sedate setting of the Masters tournament.When Daly puts the face of a Whale Driver against a Maxfli golf ball, there's a cracking detonation and then you follow a speck in the sky that threatens to accelerate into orbit.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 3, 1998
OPERA AND CHILDREN may seem an unlikely match, but that wasn't the case last week at Eldersburg Elementary School.Students in kindergarten through fourth grade were treated to an operatic performance by Kinder Opera. The performance was sponsored by the PTA and was made available through a grant from Young Audiences of Maryland Inc., a program that offers cultural programs for students.The six-member troupe brought the basic operatic elements to life through a mini-opera entitled "How the West was Sung."
NEWS
By WILLIAM HYDER and WILLIAM HYDER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 30, 2005
Colorful characters having colorful adventures while traveling: That's the substance of the picaresque novel. The genre dates to Tom Jones, Don Quixote and even earlier books, and it survives in movies like Easy Rider and Midnight Run. T Bone 'N' Weasel, which runs at Rep Stage through Oct. 9, fits comfortably into the picaresque tradition. The play follows a couple of petty criminals as they tour the back roads of the South, sometimes on wheels, sometimes on foot. They run into a variety of people, most of them neither friendly nor helpful.
NEWS
By Pamela Duncan Edwards | September 19, 1999
Editor's note: A tale of alliteration and three friends that's written by Pamela Duncan Edwards, a featured children's author at next weekend's Baltimore Book Festival.One warm Wednesday morning, the sun winked through Wombat's window and woke her up. "What a wonderful day to wander the world," she thought.Wombat went to ask Weasel and Woodchuck whether they would go with her.So they set to work, wondering what to take with them.Wombat wanted watercress-on-whole-wheat-bread sandwiches, walnut wafers, waffles and whipped cream, wedges of watermelon and her walking stick.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Cullen and Kevin Cullen,Boston Globe | February 7, 1999
London -- As British rock icons go, Mick Jagger, the pouting, ageless Rolling Stones singer, may be the biggest. But a funny thing happened here when Jagger's American wife, supermodel Jerry Hall, recently announced her intention to divorce him for his serial adultery. Jagger responded by saying their exotic 1990 wedding on Bali was a fake, so she wasn't entitled to any support.Most Brits lined up squarely behind Hall. What began as a messy celebrity divorce is becoming something of a cultural sea change, as many Britons reconsider their views of one of the most famous and richest of their countrymen.
FEATURES
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 17, 1998
Terry Jones' reworking of Kenneth Grahame's 1908 children's classic "The Wind in the Willows" for the screen looks great but plays dull. Rather than zesty and engaging, it comes across as arch and tedious, too often mechanical and lifeless.The precious quality of the film suggests strongly it would have been far better done as animation than live action.One fine day timid Mole (Steve Coogan) finds his comfy, well-appointed subterranean home shaken as if by an earthquake. His pompous, idiotic friend Toad (Jones)
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 3, 1998
OPERA AND CHILDREN may seem an unlikely match, but that wasn't the case last week at Eldersburg Elementary School.Students in kindergarten through fourth grade were treated to an operatic performance by Kinder Opera. The performance was sponsored by the PTA and was made available through a grant from Young Audiences of Maryland Inc., a program that offers cultural programs for students.The six-member troupe brought the basic operatic elements to life through a mini-opera entitled "How the West was Sung."
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1997
It's an affliction that can strike anyone, multiplying so fast, entire households are consumed without warning. They're called ferrets, and the slinky, domesticated descendants of polecats are now rivaling dogs and cats as the pet of choice in the United States -- with a difference.Once someone buys a ferret, they can't seem to stop. They fill their homes with the cuddly critters, ringing up cash registers from coast to coast with sales of cages, pooper-scoopers, sleeping hammocks -- yes, sleeping hammocks -- and fleece carrying satchels.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 2, 1991
Pity those fools -- T-Bone and Weasel.The title characters in Jon Klein's comedy at Fells Point Corner Theatre seem to live by the philosophy in the song lyric: "If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all."When these two ex-cons attempt to hold up a liquor store, the drawer of the cash register turns out to be jammed shut. Then while T-Bone tries to force it open, Weasel and the proprietor find out they're from the same town; in other words, not only can the victim I.D. them by sight, he also knows Weasel's name and address.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | February 8, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Dr. Henry Foster's nomination as U.S. surgeon general is in trouble at the White House because he did something legal that Bill Clinton supports.Which can be very dangerous these days.It used to be that it took an illegal act to knock you off as a Clinton nominee.Kimba Wood and Zoe Baird got shot down for attorney general because they didn't pay their taxes or hired illegal aliens.And Lani Guinier lost out as assistant attorney general for civil rights when Clinton discovered he disagreed with her views.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1997
It's an affliction that can strike anyone, multiplying so fast, entire households are consumed without warning. They're called ferrets, and the slinky, domesticated descendants of polecats are now rivaling dogs and cats as the pet of choice in the United States -- with a difference.Once someone buys a ferret, they can't seem to stop. They fill their homes with the cuddly critters, ringing up cash registers from coast to coast with sales of cages, pooper-scoopers, sleeping hammocks -- yes, sleeping hammocks -- and fleece carrying satchels.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1996
As 4-year-old Abriam Moore remained unconscious in a downtown hospital yesterday, his family stood near the spot in West Baltimore where he was struck in the head by a stray bullet while riding his bicycle."
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