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Wearable Art

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By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
When Amanda Hagerman first heard about a wearable art competition, she knew she wanted her Drawing for Fashion students at Southern High School to get involved. Her class' 2013 entry, "Twister," not only won first place, but the contest's founder bought the tornado costume made of tulle and broken branches to put on permanent display in her Laurel design studio. Since then, Hagerman's 15 students, in grades 10 to 12, have been plotting their second act in the annual competition sponsored by ManneqART, a nonprofit organization run by designer Lee Andersen, a native of New Zealand.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
When Amanda Hagerman first heard about a wearable art competition, she knew she wanted her Drawing for Fashion students at Southern High School to get involved. Her class' 2013 entry, "Twister," not only won first place, but the contest's founder bought the tornado costume made of tulle and broken branches to put on permanent display in her Laurel design studio. Since then, Hagerman's 15 students, in grades 10 to 12, have been plotting their second act in the annual competition sponsored by ManneqART, a nonprofit organization run by designer Lee Andersen, a native of New Zealand.
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NEWS
January 14, 2003
The Wearable Art Club will hold its first meeting today, at Seminole Sampler, a quilting supply store in Catonsville. Art to wear runs the gamut from clothes to jewelry and purses, crafted or decorated in creative ways. Techniques can include beading, dyeing, patchwork, free-motion embroidery, batik and collage. Joan Fox, co-chairwoman of the club, became interested in wearable art about a year ago. She began by learning quilting, with an eye to making interesting clothes. "I had this idea of using fabric as an artistic medium instead of paint, " she said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | April 11, 2007
Julia L. Blackwood, a fabric artist and designer for more than 30 years, died of pneumonia April 4 at Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis. The Davidsonville resident was 56. The former Julia Lampson was born into an artistic family and raised in Hartford, Conn. She was a graduate of the Oxford School in Connecticut and studied art history at Smith College. "As a young person, she was drawn to fabric and made her own clothes," said her husband of 36 years, J. Temple Blackwood, headmaster of Queen Anne School in Upper Marlboro.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | April 11, 2007
Julia L. Blackwood, a fabric artist and designer for more than 30 years, died of pneumonia April 4 at Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis. The Davidsonville resident was 56. The former Julia Lampson was born into an artistic family and raised in Hartford, Conn. She was a graduate of the Oxford School in Connecticut and studied art history at Smith College. "As a young person, she was drawn to fabric and made her own clothes," said her husband of 36 years, J. Temple Blackwood, headmaster of Queen Anne School in Upper Marlboro.
FEATURES
By Catherine Cook | July 28, 1991
To beat the growing problem of cookie-cutter fashions in a mass-market world, many women are rediscovering the appeal of wearable art. These silk-screened designs by Cristina Ffrench of California feature a colorful medley of patterns that varies with each garment.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1997
Laurie Russell, event coordinator for cardiovascular services at Union Memorial Hospital, is a woman with many interests: Fly fishing, golf, gardening, music, bird watching, art and wearable art.Tomorrow, with the start of Union Memorial's biggest fund raiser, The Rites of Spring (to run through Sunday at the Maryland State Fairgrounds), Russell will preside in her capacity as volunteer extraordinaire at the Second Hand Rose booth, where all kinds of used goodies, from black-tie dresses to bric-a-brac, will be available.
FEATURES
February 20, 1991
Carol Brody opened Craft Concepts 12 years ago at the Green Spring Station, along with co-owner Carole Halverstadt. Brody, a former potter and jeweler, started small and gradually grew to selling an array of handcrafted jewelry and wearable crafts. Many of the things in her store are done by artists who will be showing at the American Craft Council Show at the Convention Center and Festival Hall this Friday, Saturday and Sunday.How would you describe your taste in clothing?I like comfortable, unstructured clothing with classic lines that hides my flaws and helps my assets.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2005
1980s artist at MICA The '80s are back. And Jeff Koons, the superstar artist of that era, speaks at Maryland Institute College of Art's Brown Center at noon Monday. Koons, a former stockbroker, has created art from such ordinary objects as basketballs and a topiary. The Brown Center is at 1301 Mount Royal Ave. The talk will be in Flavey Hall. Call 410-225- 2300 or visit www.mica.edu. Admission is free. Blooming art Stop by the Walters Art Museum this weekend to see fresh flower arrangements inspired by works in the museum's Asian art collection.
NEWS
By Aron Davidowitz and Aron Davidowitz,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2003
What if you could own artwork representing someone's childhood memory? This weekend, at the School 33 Art Center, you could get a chance to do just that. Area artists have contributed drawings, sculptures, photographs and other forms of art depicting their holiday recollections for the Sell Your Childhood Memories exhibit and auction. The art will be offered for sale in a silent auction. The display of works in School 33's second-floor gallery will be complemented by a collection of obsolete electric toys, says curator Gary Kachadourian.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2005
1980s artist at MICA The '80s are back. And Jeff Koons, the superstar artist of that era, speaks at Maryland Institute College of Art's Brown Center at noon Monday. Koons, a former stockbroker, has created art from such ordinary objects as basketballs and a topiary. The Brown Center is at 1301 Mount Royal Ave. The talk will be in Flavey Hall. Call 410-225- 2300 or visit www.mica.edu. Admission is free. Blooming art Stop by the Walters Art Museum this weekend to see fresh flower arrangements inspired by works in the museum's Asian art collection.
NEWS
By Aron Davidowitz and Aron Davidowitz,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2003
What if you could own artwork representing someone's childhood memory? This weekend, at the School 33 Art Center, you could get a chance to do just that. Area artists have contributed drawings, sculptures, photographs and other forms of art depicting their holiday recollections for the Sell Your Childhood Memories exhibit and auction. The art will be offered for sale in a silent auction. The display of works in School 33's second-floor gallery will be complemented by a collection of obsolete electric toys, says curator Gary Kachadourian.
NEWS
January 14, 2003
The Wearable Art Club will hold its first meeting today, at Seminole Sampler, a quilting supply store in Catonsville. Art to wear runs the gamut from clothes to jewelry and purses, crafted or decorated in creative ways. Techniques can include beading, dyeing, patchwork, free-motion embroidery, batik and collage. Joan Fox, co-chairwoman of the club, became interested in wearable art about a year ago. She began by learning quilting, with an eye to making interesting clothes. "I had this idea of using fabric as an artistic medium instead of paint, " she said.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 2000
FOR THE SECOND year in a row, Uniontown resident Georgia Groomes has won the prestigious Frances Kahn Award for Wearable Art at the Richmond Craft & Design Show in Richmond, Va. The show was judged by Kenneth R. Trapp, curator-in-charge at Renwick Gallery of the National Museum of American Art in Washington. "It was a pretty nice honor," said Groomes, as she worked at her home studio overlooking farms near Uniontown. "The Richmond show has been going on for 35 years and people [who compete]
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1997
Laurie Russell, event coordinator for cardiovascular services at Union Memorial Hospital, is a woman with many interests: Fly fishing, golf, gardening, music, bird watching, art and wearable art.Tomorrow, with the start of Union Memorial's biggest fund raiser, The Rites of Spring (to run through Sunday at the Maryland State Fairgrounds), Russell will preside in her capacity as volunteer extraordinaire at the Second Hand Rose booth, where all kinds of used goodies, from black-tie dresses to bric-a-brac, will be available.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | February 25, 1993
For the first time in many a moon, the worlds of fashion and the crafts are in convergence. Designers and manufacturers are having a virtual love-in with the trappings of the hippie generation.That hand-made look, so current now, was always the defining spirit of the ACC Craft Fair, which opens at the Convention Center tomorrow. The annual show, a major draw in Baltimore for 17 years, brings together 600 of the nation's best crafts artists working in furniture, quilts, ceramics, glass, toys, jewelry, clothes.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 24, 2000
FOR THE SECOND year in a row, Uniontown resident Georgia Groomes has won the prestigious Frances Kahn Award for Wearable Art at the Richmond Craft & Design Show in Richmond, Va. The show was judged by Kenneth R. Trapp, curator-in-charge at Renwick Gallery of the National Museum of American Art in Washington. "It was a pretty nice honor," said Groomes, as she worked at her home studio overlooking farms near Uniontown. "The Richmond show has been going on for 35 years and people [who compete]
NEWS
By NATALIE HARVEY | December 15, 1992
Students at Waterloo Elementary and Phelps Luck schools in Long Reach village have the opportunity to learn "the way things are put together" in the extracurricular Hands-On-Science (HOS) program "Connections".For the past five years the nonprofit program has been offered under the direction of area coordinator, Chris Teagarden. Begun in Montgomery County in 1980, HOS is an after-school recreational science program sponsored by the PTA.The program is supported by the National Science Foundation nationally and offered in 70 locations.
NEWS
By NATALIE HARVEY | December 15, 1992
Students at Waterloo Elementary and Phelps Luck schools in Long Reach village have the opportunity to learn "the way things are put together" in the extracurricular Hands-On-Science (HOS) program "Connections".For the past five years the nonprofit program has been offered under the direction of area coordinator, Chris Teagarden. Begun in Montgomery County in 1980, HOS is an after-school recreational science program sponsored by the PTA.The program is supported by the National Science Foundation nationally and offered in 70 locations.
FEATURES
By Catherine Cook | July 28, 1991
To beat the growing problem of cookie-cutter fashions in a mass-market world, many women are rediscovering the appeal of wearable art. These silk-screened designs by Cristina Ffrench of California feature a colorful medley of patterns that varies with each garment.
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