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By Lois Fenton | October 18, 1990
Q:--I am in a service industry (bus driver) and wear uniform-type clothing for my work. For most social occasions, a tweed jacket with trousers is OK, or for slightly dressier occasions, I own a blue blazer and gray slacks. I am 40 years old and have never owned a suit, never really needed one. However, I'd like to own one good suit for that possible really special occasion. I've decided on the traditional single-breasted, non-trendy, business cut, in 100 percent wool.For the one-suit man, would you recommend plain navy, navy pinstripe, plain gray (dark)
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By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | November 11, 2007
Layering, a major trend of the past several seasons, has mainly been couched in terms of women's fashions. But men can, and should, layer their clothes, too. One of the easiest ways to layer is with a sweater vest. Not only does the vest add a little something extra to the traditional slacks-and-button-up-shirt look, it's also a way to keep warm - but look cool at the same time. At Miss Shirley's in Roland Park, Dana MacDonald showed his flair for fashion in a conservative sweater and a funky beret.
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By Elsa Klensch and Elsa Klensch,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 5, 1995
Q: I have a plaid shirt I put away last year after wearing it for seasons. Now that plaids are back again, I'd like to resurrect it for evening. It's in a fine wool with a shirt collar and long sleeves. Any ideas?A: Milan's Giovanna Ferragamo is a designer who loves working with plaids.Among their virtues, she notes, plaids "are seasonless, pretty and look as good in cotton as they do in taffeta. Another important point is that plaids go well together."One way to dress up your shirt would be to put it with a matching or contrasting plaid stole.
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By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,Sun Reporter | September 9, 2007
Casual dressing is such a staple of modern American life, it's easy to forget that there once was a time when people dressed for dinner, or for the theater, or simply to go out for the day. That's why it was heartwarming to spy Bert Choate strolling through shops in White Marsh, looking dapper in a suit, tie and snazzy hat. Everything on this stylish gent was matched with something else: Shoes to suit. Tie to pocket square. Hat to belt. And his manners and smile matched the entire polished outfit.
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By Casi Clocker and Casi Clocker,Staff Writer | August 5, 1992
Mark Faber is an attorney in private practice in Baltimore. Originally from New York, Mr. Faber attended Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland law school and discovered he liked Baltimore enough to stay in the area. Lately, he says he spends his free time tuned into the Olympics and enjoys basketball "for the first five minutes until it becomes a blow-out," as well as diving and gymnastics. He and his fiancee, Joann Moncure, live in Baltimore with their Scottish terrier, Abby, and their Schnauzer, Doc -- they never have to worry about what to wear and always look good, Mr. Faber explains.
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August 28, 1991
Kery Hummel is director of Health Systems Development of the Maryland Health Resources Planning Commission. He's a Texan who moved to Western Maryland 13 years ago. He dresses to suit his personality and active lifestyle -- sturdy denim jackets, boots, unique jewelry and smart hats.How would you describe your taste in clothing?My tastes are complex and emotional. I dress not only for the job I am doing, but for my mood. I can wear a suit with a wild, funky tie when I feel extroverted, or a subtle, somber tie when I need to think or I feel low. My moods also show in the shoes and hats I wear.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | November 11, 2007
Layering, a major trend of the past several seasons, has mainly been couched in terms of women's fashions. But men can, and should, layer their clothes, too. One of the easiest ways to layer is with a sweater vest. Not only does the vest add a little something extra to the traditional slacks-and-button-up-shirt look, it's also a way to keep warm - but look cool at the same time. At Miss Shirley's in Roland Park, Dana MacDonald showed his flair for fashion in a conservative sweater and a funky beret.
NEWS
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,Sun Reporter | September 9, 2007
Casual dressing is such a staple of modern American life, it's easy to forget that there once was a time when people dressed for dinner, or for the theater, or simply to go out for the day. That's why it was heartwarming to spy Bert Choate strolling through shops in White Marsh, looking dapper in a suit, tie and snazzy hat. Everything on this stylish gent was matched with something else: Shoes to suit. Tie to pocket square. Hat to belt. And his manners and smile matched the entire polished outfit.
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By Casi H. Clocker and Casi H. Clocker,Staff Writer | September 3, 1992
Carroll H. Hynson Jr. of Pasadena is the deputy director for Public Affairs at the Maryland State Lottery. Mr. Hynson enjoys power boating on the Chesapeake Bay, which he says is the best therapy in the world. In the winter, he likes to spend time running, skiing and watching boxing.How would you describe your taste in clothing?It ranges from conservative to trendy. My favorite in ultimate fashion is Hugo Boss, but I also have no problem in wearing a basic, everyday quality suit. I never wear the same color two days in a row -- I try to rotate my clothes so that it appears that I have more than I do. Also, I try to tastefully color-coordinate my wardrobe with eyeglasses with lenses or frames that match my outfit -- without being gaudy.
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By Barbara Dewitt and Barbara Dewitt,Los Angeles Daily News | May 27, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- Lucky you. You've got a job interview.Not only do you have to act confident when your palms are damp enough to moisten postage stamps and your stomach is lurching like an off-balance Maytag, but prospective employers expect you to look great, too.No, not like you're going on a date or to a party, but professional and businesslike. Come to an interview with an outfit that's appropriate for the job and the company, said numerous local employers, who shared horror stories about people they never hired and tips for the types they would like to hire.
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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2000
Kathy Sabatier's come a long way from her uniform days. The one-time candy striper has a master's degree from the University of Maryland School of Nursing. But, in recent years, the 51-year-old director of the Institute for Johns Hopkins Nursing attends more board meetings than patients. And that means wearing more suits -- another kind of uniform -- but always with an intriguing twist. "I'm not a plain old suit person," Sabatier says. "When I wear a suit, I usually wear an interesting pin or perhaps an unusual jacket with a plain skirt."
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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1999
Fernando Zuniga-Pflucker takes the same approach to assembling his daily wardrobe as he does to designing a building. For the architect with Baltimore-based Kann & Associates, jackets, slacks, shirts and ties are building blocks to experiment with, just like bricks, mortar and glass."
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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1997
Don't believe Bryan Stark, 31, when he says he dresses like the "stereotypical ad guy." Sure, he favors bright ties and suspenders, but the vice president of client services at the Reeves Agency puts it all together in a refreshing and not not-too-deadly-earnest way, impressing clients and colleagues.Which came first, the look or the career?My mother worked for a large, worldwide global ad agency on the West Coast. She always liked how the account guys dressed, so I think ever since the age of when I could wear a suit or a tie, she bought me bold ties and suspenders.
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By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | August 29, 1996
So what does a beauty pageant winner do during her reign? Ann Coale, Miss Maryland U.S.A., does marketing work for her dad's trucking company, puts in some hours as a fitness trainer, does a little modeling and volunteers for the Boys and Girls Clubs of Harford County, Maryland Special Olympics and the Adult Literacy Education Program.Her crown leads to the Miss U.S.A. pageant next year, and that leads to the Miss Universe event.The beauty pageant thing just kind of happened, she says. She graduated from Loyola College last year with a degree in business administration, and she's still looking for a career direction in the fitness business or media work.
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By Elsa Klensch and Elsa Klensch,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 5, 1995
Q: I have a plaid shirt I put away last year after wearing it for seasons. Now that plaids are back again, I'd like to resurrect it for evening. It's in a fine wool with a shirt collar and long sleeves. Any ideas?A: Milan's Giovanna Ferragamo is a designer who loves working with plaids.Among their virtues, she notes, plaids "are seasonless, pretty and look as good in cotton as they do in taffeta. Another important point is that plaids go well together."One way to dress up your shirt would be to put it with a matching or contrasting plaid stole.
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By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1994
To understand Melanie Sabelhaus' style, look in her sock drawer. There, you find 40 pairs of knee socks festooned with everything from flags and stripes to flowers and horses.As the president of Exclusive Interim Properties, a real-estate firm that rents furnished accommodations to executives, movie stars and others passing through town, she's likely to turn up for work in a pair of Bermuda shorts, a blazer and socks."My children tell me I look like a geek," says Ms. Sabelhaus, 45, who lives in Green Spring Valley, "but that's OK."
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By Pat Morgan and Pat Morgan,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | January 30, 1991
"I love how you're always wearing men's jackets," my friend said. "I always wanted to have a signature style, instead of being such a mishmash."The funny thing is, I'd always envied her style. At least, until she told me she had none.A lot of women tell me that they, like my friend, have no style. Most people do have a distinct personal style, but many people need help figuring out what it is.With the help of image consultant Joyce Knudsen, I've come up with some basic "types." You probably won't fit neatly into one category, but look for the one that sounds most like you.The sophisticate is very ambitious.
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By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | October 22, 1992
If clothes make the man, what do Pete Pompey's jazzy suits, coordinated pocket scarves and bright ties make him?"They make me feel good about myself," says the 52-year-old athletic director of Dunbar High School.They also give him a psychological edge when he's coaching the school's championship football and basketball teams. He gives most of the credit to his wife, Barbara, and 24-year-old daughter, Rhonda, who send him out of the family's West Baltimore home '' in style.Not only do they shop for him, they even select his clothes the day of a big game.
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By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Sun Staff Writer | March 3, 1994
It's not easy to pin Joan Marie Conway down about her style.She's not "a clothes horse, fashion queen or shopaholic." And she doesn't look the same every day. The closet of her Federal Hill home is filled with different looks: Wool shorts from a Tweeds catalog hang near a faux leopard coat from a Fells Point thrift shop.What's most important is that her wardrobe express her personality, says Ms. Conway, 34, the executive director of the Mid-Atlantic Cancer Research Foundation in Silver Spring.
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By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | September 9, 1993
Ami Taubenfeld's wardrobe has to say a lot. As the owner of Great Occasions Caterers, she needs clothes that show she's smart, sophisticated and fun. They also have to be durable since stains and spills are part of her job. And she has to pull it all together in 30 minutes or less so she and her husband, Mark, can get their three children ready for school.It's a tall order, and Ms. Taubenfeld fills it by consulting the pros, keeping organized and making the most of accessories.The one thing she never leaves home without is an apron.
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