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By Los Angeles Times | February 28, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Iraq covered up evidence of a biological weapons program to develop cholera, tuberculosis and the plague that was much larger than previously suspected, U.N. officials disclosed yesterday.In the 1980s, the Iraqi government imported enough material to cultivate 3.3 tons of bacteria, said Rolf Ekeus, chairman of the United Nations Special Commission in charge of Iraqi disarmament.When confronted last week, Iraq claimed that the material was imported for medical use. But when U.N. inspectors asked for the growth media or documentation about it, Iraq claimed that both were destroyed during 1991 uprisings after Operation Desert Storm.
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By Sam Wazan | November 18, 2013
Desperately yearning for the carnage of the Lebanese civil war to end, my mother once told a neighbor, "I don't know whether to prepare dinner for my children or myself for a funeral. " It was 1975, I was 10 years old, and my neighborhood in Beirut had disintegrated into a combat zone. I took shelter between the stairways and garages to avoid sniper fire, rocket shrapnel and tank artillery. Of course, had chemical weapons been fired, I would have perished no matter where I hid. But I survived and managed to immigrate to the United States in 1989.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 14, 1995
TEHRAN, Iran -- Iran's top nuclear official said yesterday that his country intended to build about 10 nuclear power plants in the next two decades but denied that Iran is trying to develop nuclear weapons.The official, Reza Amrollahi, also said that last year he signed a formal contract with China for two nuclear power reactors and that Chinese experts had completed a feasibility study and had begun to draw up blueprints and engineering reports for a site in southern Iran.Iran has already made a "down payment" for the project, which will cost $800 million to $900 million and involve training by Chinese experts, said Mr. Amrollahi, director of Iran's Atomic Energy Organization.
NEWS
October 31, 2012
Robert Ehrlich Jr.'s recent column ("Obama's foreign policy reset has little to show for it," Oct. 28) could not be further from the truth when it states that Iran is "oh-so-close to acquiring a nuclear weapon. " In fact, our own intelligence agencies have stated that Iran has neither nuclear weapons nor a weapons program and ended its former program in 2003. Mr. Ehrlich has been wrong about his support for a disastrous war in Iraq, his calling for military action in Iran and his willingness to allow Israel to dictate U.S. foreign policy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - Russian intelligence officers secretly placed sophisticated nuclear detection equipment inside North Korea at the request of the Central Intelligence Agency in the 1990s, to assist the United States in tracking the North Korean nuclear weapons program, intelligence officials said. The Russians placed nuclear monitors provided by the CIA inside the Russian Embassy in the North Korean capital, Pyongyang, to try to detect telltale signs of activity from the North Korean nuclear weapons program.
NEWS
February 6, 2012
The threat of an Israeli strike against Iran'snuclear facilities ratcheted up a notch last week when Israel'sdefense minister, Ehud Barak, issued new warnings that time was running out to stop Tehran's drive to build a bomb. If Israel waits much longer, Mr. Barak told a security conference in Jerusalem, it would no longer have the option of destroying the Iranian weapons program before it disappeared into newly constructed mountain bunkers where it would be invulnerable to attack. Israel's escalating rhetoric is understandable: The nation's leaders have good reason to fear a nuclear-armed Iran would act on its vows to destroy the Jewish state.
NEWS
By Patrick E. Tyler and David E. Sanger and Patrick E. Tyler and David E. Sanger,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 6, 2004
TRIPOLI, Libya -- Pakistan was the source of the centrifuge design technology that made it possible for Libya to make major strides in the past two years in enriching uranium for use in nuclear weapons, officials in Washington and other Western experts said yesterday. The officials emphasized that they possessed no evidence that the Pakistani government of President Pervez Musharraf a crucial ally in the pursuit of al- Qaida knew about the transfer of technology to Libya, which helped finance Pakistans early nuclear weapons program three decades ago. Many of the centrifuge parts that Libya imported, and that Italy intercepted in October, were manufactured in Malaysia, according to experts familiar with the investigation.
NEWS
By Michael A. Lev and Michael A. Lev,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 4, 2004
BEIJING - After months of loud threats and quiet diplomacy, Pyongyang confirmed reports yesterday that it had agreed to resume talks this month with the United States over the future of North Korea's nuclear weapons program. In its first pronouncement since agreeing to the talks, North Korea repeated yesterday that the United States should compensate Pyongyang in exchange for freezing its nuclear weapons programs as a first step in resolving a 15 month-old standoff, the Associated Press reported.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 2003
SOUTH OF BAGHDAD, Iraq - Information supplied by an Iraqi scientist that Iraq destroyed chemical weapons and biological-warfare equipment before the war has shifted the focus from finding such weapons to locating key people who worked on the programs, experts and military officers said. The effort to find the building blocks of a program for unconventional weapons and "dual use" equipment with military and peaceful applications has also taken on new urgency, experts said. "The paradigm has shifted," said a member of Mobile Exploitation Team Alpha, a U.S. military team hunting for unconventional weapons in Iraq.
NEWS
By Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi and Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 12, 2007
TEHRAN, Iran -- In his first formal news conference since a U.S. intelligence report last week undercut claims that Iran was secretly developing nuclear weapons, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad struck an unusually mild tone yesterday, calling for dialogue with the United States and forgoing his usual anti-American and anti-Israeli rhetoric. He also denied that Iran had resumed a secret nuclear weapons program, a claim made by an Iranian exile group, Mujahedeen-e-Khalq. The group, listed by the State Department and the European Union as a terrorist organization, cited unidentified sources in Iran as saying the Islamic republic restarted its program in 2004.
NEWS
By Alireza Jafarzadeh | April 16, 2012
After a yearlong round of escalating international economic sanctions and rhetoric, the regime in Iran has finally come around to raising expectations that it will take some constructive steps in reining in its nuclear weapons ambitions. But this cycle of threat and accommodation has played out before, and its outcome should have been predictable. According to the information provided by Iranian dissidents obtained from their sources inside the regime, as well as the U.N.'s atomic watchdog agency, the nuclear genie is out of the bottle in Iran, and the regime's genius for delay and subterfuge will only give it the time to complete the dash to a workable weapon.
NEWS
February 6, 2012
The threat of an Israeli strike against Iran'snuclear facilities ratcheted up a notch last week when Israel'sdefense minister, Ehud Barak, issued new warnings that time was running out to stop Tehran's drive to build a bomb. If Israel waits much longer, Mr. Barak told a security conference in Jerusalem, it would no longer have the option of destroying the Iranian weapons program before it disappeared into newly constructed mountain bunkers where it would be invulnerable to attack. Israel's escalating rhetoric is understandable: The nation's leaders have good reason to fear a nuclear-armed Iran would act on its vows to destroy the Jewish state.
NEWS
By Robert C. Koehler | December 25, 2011
Bomb bomb bomb, bomb bomb Iran ... Or as Mitt Romney put it, playing the irresponsible-lunatic game convincingly enough to become the leading Republican presidential candidate: "If we re-elect Barack Obama, Iran will have a nuclear weapon. " The consensus congeals: Our next war must be with Iran. A report issued by the U.N.'s International Atomic Energy Agency, which The New York Times called "chillingly comprehensive" (though this is debatable), stoked this long-simmering agenda.
NEWS
By Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi and Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 9, 2008
TEHRAN, Iran -- Iran has begun to triple its capacity to enrich uranium, a process that can produce fuel for nuclear weapons or power plants, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad announced yesterday on state television. Iran has about 3,000 centrifuges operating, according to international inspectors, and Ahmadinejad said his country had begun installing 6,000 more. Arms control experts estimate that 3,000 centrifuges, operating continuously for one year, can produce enough highly enriched uranium for one nuclear bomb.
NEWS
By Stephen Kinzer | March 12, 2008
In a reality-based world, the idea that the United States should attack Iran would by now seem most implausible. Not only is the Iraq war taking a terrible financial and human toll, but American intelligence agencies have concluded that Iran is not building nuclear weapons. Iran should logically fall into the same category as Cuba, Venezuela, Syria and North Korea - countries that behave in ways the U.S. dislikes but do not pose such imminent threats that they must be bombed. Unfortunately, though, reality is not what guides the Bush administration.
NEWS
By Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi and Ramin Mostaghim and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 12, 2007
TEHRAN, Iran -- In his first formal news conference since a U.S. intelligence report last week undercut claims that Iran was secretly developing nuclear weapons, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad struck an unusually mild tone yesterday, calling for dialogue with the United States and forgoing his usual anti-American and anti-Israeli rhetoric. He also denied that Iran had resumed a secret nuclear weapons program, a claim made by an Iranian exile group, Mujahedeen-e-Khalq. The group, listed by the State Department and the European Union as a terrorist organization, cited unidentified sources in Iran as saying the Islamic republic restarted its program in 2004.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 1, 1994
SEOUL, South Korea -- North Korea has refused to allow the International Atomic Energy Agency to conduct tests of spent fuel that could clear up a mystery surrounding the nation's nuclear weapons program, an agency official said yesterday.North Korea had indicated that it would begin replacing the fuel rods in its biggest nuclear reactor next week and had invited the inspectors to observe the process.But the atomic energy agency, a branch of the United Nations, had also been seeking assurances that it could take measurements of the spent fuel, which could indicate whether North Korea has diverted any for reprocessing for its weapons program.
NEWS
October 31, 2012
Robert Ehrlich Jr.'s recent column ("Obama's foreign policy reset has little to show for it," Oct. 28) could not be further from the truth when it states that Iran is "oh-so-close to acquiring a nuclear weapon. " In fact, our own intelligence agencies have stated that Iran has neither nuclear weapons nor a weapons program and ended its former program in 2003. Mr. Ehrlich has been wrong about his support for a disastrous war in Iraq, his calling for military action in Iran and his willingness to allow Israel to dictate U.S. foreign policy.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Peter Spiegel,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 11, 2007
TEL AVIV, Israel -- The top U.S. military officer attempted to reassure Israeli defense leaders yesterday that the United States still views Iran as a serious threat to the Jewish state, even as the Israelis disagree with an American intelligence finding that Iran ceased its nuclear weapons program in 2003. Adm. Michael G. Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, discussed the National Intelligence Estimate of Iran's nuclear program with the head of Israel's military and Defense Minister Ehud Barak in back-to-back meetings here, where the report has provoked widespread debate over U.S. intentions.
NEWS
By Michael Jacobson | December 10, 2007
Some analysts are arguing that because last week's National Intelligence Estimate concluded that Iran halted its covert nuclear program in 2003, sanctions against Iran are no longer necessary. In fact, the opposite conclusion could be drawn from the report, which suggests that Iran is vulnerable to outside pressure on the nuclear issue - and much more still needs to be done on this front. In 2005, the U.S. embarked on a new strategy designed to ratchet up the financial pressure against Tehran for its nuclear-related activities and its support for terrorism.
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