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NEWS
By Erin Cox | December 19, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley took his call for a ban on assault weapons to national television Wednesday night, arguing on MSNBC's Hard Ball that "these combat weapons have no place in a civilized society. " O'Malley this week said his administration is crafting a package of state gun-control legislation likely to be introduced during the General Assembly session that begins next month. Wednesday night, O'Malley told MSNBC's Chris Matthews that political sentiment has shifted. "I think we've all been changed as a country," O'Malley said in a segment that included former Pennsylvania governor Ed Rendell, who also encouraged stricter gun laws in the wake of the Connecticut shooting that killed 27 people, 20 of them elementary school children.   
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NEWS
August 13, 2014
U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake's decision Tuesday upholding Maryland's ban on assault weapons and large-capacity ammunition magazines almost certainly won't be the last word on the subject. The gun advocates who sued to overturn the ban won't be satisfied until they've heard from the Supreme Court, nor likely will their compatriots from four other states where courts have come to the same conclusion as Judge Blake. But her ruling provides a clear analysis of why the state's interest in banning these weapons outweighs the individuals' interest in owning them, even under the expansive view of the Second Amendment the Supreme Court embraced several years ago. No matter how often gun rights advocates like to quote the phrase "shall not be infringed" from the Second Amendment, even the current Supreme Court, which overturned a century of precedent in its determination that the amendment conveys an individual rather than a collective right, recognizes that it has limits.
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NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley predicted that Maryland will ban assault weapons during the General Assembly session that began Wednesday. "Their sole purpose is not for sport; it is to kill human beings - as quickly and as many as possible, as effectively as possible," O'Malley said, referring to guns like the semiautomatic Bushmaster rifle used last month in the shooting deaths of 20 Connecticut children. "I believe that we will, in fact, pass legislation that … restores the assault weapons ban," O'Malley said.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Lawyers for the state and gun rights advocates debated in federal court Tuesday about the government's power to hem in the Second Amendment to ward off mass shootings. Spectators crammed into a federal courtroom in downtown Baltimore to watch the hearing regarding bans on the sale or sharing of assault rifles and magazines capable of holding more than 10 rounds. Those provisions, which took effect in October, were among a package of measures enacted to strengthen Maryland's gun laws after 26 people were killed in an elementary school shooting in Newtown, Conn.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
As Maryland lawmakers prepared to gather for their 2013 session, Gov. Martin O'Malley said Wednesday that he believes the General Assembly is poised to pass a ban on assault weapons this year. Gun control is expected to be one of the leading issues facing legislators in the wake of the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre in Connecticut last month. O'Malley said he will work with legislative leaders to craft a comprehensive package to address high-powered weapons, mental health and school security.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
Delegates are considering scaling back the assault weapons ban in Gov. Martin O'Malley's gun bill to keep legal the sale of guns used recent mass shootings in Newtown, Conn. and Aurora, Colo. O'Malley blasted an email to supporters Thursday morning, calling on them to contact lawmakers to keep the assault weapons ban intact. "Military-style assault weapons belong on the battlefield, NOT on the streets of our cities and towns," the email said. "We need you to ACT NOW. "  Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, flanked by police chiefs, held a press conference Thursday morning to urge lawmakers to pass the "common-sense, balanced approach" that has already been approved by the Senate.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | March 10, 1994
A proposed ban on 18 types of semiautomatic pistols is expected to reach the floor of the Maryland Senate for debate as early as tomorrow, with opponents threatening to filibuster or sink the measure with amendments."
NEWS
By Steve Chapman | May 28, 2004
CHICAGO - An organization called the Million Mom March held a rally in Washington on Mother's Day to urge a renewal of the 1994 federal assault weapons ban. If you must know, the turnout was about 997,500 short. But the advocates are not easily discouraged. Afterward, they launched a vehicle called the Big Pink Rig on a "Halt the Assault Tour." The bus will crisscross the nation until September, when the ban is scheduled to expire. The 1994 law was a monument to President Bill Clinton's distinctive political genius - which generally involved tiny symbolic changes that pleased particular constituencies without actually having much effect.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2004
A Senate committee killed a proposal to ban assault weapons yesterday, ending all possibility that the General Assembly will put a gun control bill into effect in Maryland before the federal ban expires in September. The 6-5 vote against the bill in the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee came as no surprise because Sen. John A. Giannetti Jr., who represented the swing vote on the panel, announced his intent to vote against the proposal weeks ago. The Prince George's Democrat delivered on his promise yesterday, joining the committee's three Republicans and two conservative Democrats in opposing the bill sponsored by Sen. Robert J. Garagiola.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2007
A Senate committee yesterday rejected a ban on assault weapons, effectively ending the proposal's chances for this General Assembly session. The Judicial Proceedings Committee deadlocked 5-5 over the ban, which means the bill will likely not get a full vote on the Senate floor. With no corresponding legislation in the House of Delegates, that means the issue is almost certainly dead for the year. Two Baltimore County Democrats - Sens. Norman K. Stone and James Brochin - joined three Republicans on the committee to kill the bill.
NEWS
April 7, 2013
It seems that everyone has an opinion regarding having armed personnel at schools, whether or not to ban certain weapons and magazines, requiring licensing for possessing a hand gun along with finger printing of the purchasers ("Gun advocates detail plan to arm teachers," April 3). I have no agendas, so these views are based on common sense. As a grandparent, I would love to see an armed person at my grandchildren's schools. I don't necessarily think it should be an educator but maybe someone that has experience in protecting such as veteran who has served and protected a nation.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
The House of Delegates voted Wednesday to give Maryland one of the toughest gun laws in the nation, passing a bill that would ban the sale of assault-type weapons, set a 10-bullet limit on magazines and require fingerprints and a license to buy a handgun. Delegates altered the Senate's bill during more than 10 hours of emotional floor debate that lasted over two days. Key lawmakers said they expect the differences to be resolved quickly and the legislation sent to Gov. Martin O'Malley for his promised signature.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley's sweeping gun control bill cleared a major hurdle Friday night as two committees sent a ban on assault-style weapons and a new handgun licensing scheme to the House floor. The central pieces of the governor's bill, already approved by the Maryland Senate, survived despite multiple amendments during a marathon eight-hour joint committee voting session that stretched late into Friday night. Led by Republicans, gun control opponents tried unsuccessfully to strip fingerprinting provisions and shooting proficiency requirements from the handgun licensing plan.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2013
A joint session of two key House committees tweaked parts of Gov. Martin O'Malley's sweeping gun bill during the first five hours of a debate expected to last into the evening. The changes - which left intact the central provisions of handgun licensing and a ban on the sale of assault weapons - were made in the first public action since February on the legislation. The bill also limits magazines to ten bullets and addresses when people with mental illness can buy guns. Over the past month since the Senate passed the bill, lawmakers have been debating behind-the-scenes whether to scale back the ban on assault rifles to exclude some models, including the AR-15.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
As a key committee is set to vote on his gun bill Friday, Gov. Martin O'Malley on Thursday called for public support for an assault weapons ban and other gun-control reforms. In an email sent by his political action committee, O'Malley criticized federal lawmakers for inaction in the wake of Newtown and urged for Maryland to "do something real. " "While Congressional Republicans continue to sit on their hands instead of acting on the President's commonsense plan, we don't have to wait on them here in Maryland," the email said.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 27, 2013
Given the lack of interest in Congress in protecting children from guns, it was nice to hear a grown-up in Washington speak on behalf of kids, any kids - in this case, the nearly 40,000 kids who live with same-sex parents in California. "They want their parents to have full recognition and full status," Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy said during Tuesday's hearing on Proposition 8, the 2008 ballot measure that banned gay marriage in California. "The voice of those children is important in this case, don't you think?"
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 24, 2005
Despite dire predictions that the streets would be awash in military-style guns, the expiration of the decade-long assault weapons ban in September has not set off a sustained surge in the weapons' sales, gun makers and sellers say. It also has not caused any noticeable increase in gun crime in the past seven months, according to several metropolitan police departments. The uneventful expiration of the assault weapons ban did not surprise gun owners, nor did it surprise some advocates of gun control.
NEWS
By PETER H. STONE | May 7, 1995
The bomb that wrecked the federal building in Oklahoma City has also shaken the political terrain for the National Rifle Association.The group, which claims 3.3 million members, has come under withering fire from some politicians, a few of its former leaders and gun control advocates for making inflammatory rhetoric a part of its campaigns to overturn the federal assault weapons ban and recruit new members.Critics say that the NRA's repeated verbal assaults on federal agents as jackbooted "thugs" have parallels to -- and may have helped foster -- the militant anti-government stances of some of the private militia groups that are suspected to have links to the bombing.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
Four weeks after Gov. Martin O'Malley's gun-control bill passed the Senate, a key House committee has yet to schedule a vote and continues to debate whether to scale it back. Among the possible changes still on the table: whether to take the AR-15 and a few other assault-style rifles off the list of guns whose sale would be banned. "We're still ruminating," said Del. Kathleen Dumais, vice chair of the House Judiciary Committee and a Democrat from Montgomery County. About a half-dozen lawmakers have been meeting once or twice a week behind closed doors to determine what changes -- if any -- they want to adopt to on a bill that would give Maryland some of the nation's strictest gun laws.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
Delegates are considering scaling back the assault weapons ban in Gov. Martin O'Malley's gun bill to keep legal the sale of guns used recent mass shootings in Newtown, Conn. and Aurora, Colo. O'Malley blasted an email to supporters Thursday morning, calling on them to contact lawmakers to keep the assault weapons ban intact. "Military-style assault weapons belong on the battlefield, NOT on the streets of our cities and towns," the email said. "We need you to ACT NOW. "  Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, flanked by police chiefs, held a press conference Thursday morning to urge lawmakers to pass the "common-sense, balanced approach" that has already been approved by the Senate.
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