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NEWS
June 28, 2014
Are The Sun's editors naive enough to really believe that the last of Syrian chemical weapons have been turned over ( "Muscular diplomacy," June 26)? I think that in the haste to find something to praise President Barack Obama for, you may again find egg on your editorial page. Remember the "red line?" F. Cordell, Lutherville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
As he transitioned back into a relief role for the American League Division Series, Orioles right-hander Kevin Gausman said he was ready for whatever role manager Buck Showalter had in store for him. Gausman was called to make his postseason debut in Friday afternoon's ALDS Game 2 with a critical task: Halt a Detroit Tigers offensive onslaught. After left-hander Wei-Yin Chen allowed five runs in the fourth inning, the 23-year-old Gausman entered with a runner on second base and two outs, then struck out Ian Kinsler swinging on a 98 mph fastball..
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NEWS
September 11, 2013
The current crisis in the Middle East deals with the Syria's use of chemical weapons, but the fact that it is taking place in Syria is immaterial. The problem could be anywhere in Europe, Africa or Asia and be of no less importance ( "Syria: Where's the outrage?" Sept. 3). The issue is not regime change in the middle of a sectarian civil war but the use of deadly gas by a rogue state. We in the free world must not sanction or tolerate in any the use of such horrific weapons. All possible measures must be undertaken to prevent this catastrophe, even if it means punitive or military action against the offender.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
A man fired a handgun on South Charles Street in Federal Hill amid a fight that happened after the bars closed early Saturday morning, according to police. The gun, a 9MM Ekol Volga, is thought to be a "blank gun" that makes a sound like a gun but does not fire a bullet, according to an email sent by Southern Police District Commander Major Ian Dombroski, Commander of the Southern Police District, to the Federal Hill Neighborhood Association. The gun still needs to undergo ballistics testing to confirm that, he wrote.
NEWS
December 2, 2012
As a 25-year retired veteran of the U.S. Army Reserves, a year of which I served on active duty in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, I find Maryland lawmakers' unwillingness to support veterans' right to carry concealed handguns disheartening. Faced with serious security issues at home, veterans are either denied or don't even apply for concealed carry handgun permits. Although the state contends that it does not deny people permits, the reality contradicts that. Many veterans like myself were trained on weapons and trained others on systems ranging from assault rifles and machine guns to rockets and high explosives.
NEWS
By David W. Wise | July 13, 2011
A recent report by the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments concluded, "Historically the U.S. military has often been slow to identify, adequately prioritize, and respond effectively to the emerging challenges likely to impose the greatest stresses on our forces in future contingencies…" The 30-year shipbuilding plan just submitted by the U.S. Navy unfortunately confirms this judgment, and recent decisions by the Senate Armed Services Committee...
NEWS
February 1, 2004
THE BBC ended up as a useful foil for British Prime Minister Tony Blair. A highly charged investigation into the suicide of David Kelly, a government arms expert, came down hard on the broadcaster. It determined that a reporter, Andrew Gilligan, had been out of bounds when he inaccurately quoted Mr. Kelly - though not by name - as saying the prime minister's office had "sexed up" a report on Iraq's weapons. Mr. Blair last week declared himself exonerated, and heads rolled at the BBC. Attention was diverted from one very salient fact: that the government report, which claimed Iraq could mobilize chemical arms within 45 minutes, was dead wrong, no matter what Mr. Kelly may have said.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 30, 2012
Here's an assumption any post-9/11American might make: Someone in a dark room full of computers and video monitors deep inside one of our snoopy federal law enforcement agencies is tracking the purchases of large caches of weapons and ammunition by anyone at any time anywhere in the country, including Anne Arundel County. Isn't that the sort of thing we've been paying for with our federal taxes over the last decade? People who buy explosives for bombs or enough weapons to outfit a small army - they're monitored by someone deep inside the Department of Homeland Security and our vast array of federal agencies, right?
NEWS
May 7, 2013
Does it occur to anyone in the left-wing Obama administration that arming Syrian rebels with modern weapons will result in arming a group of fighters who live just across the border from Israel ("The best bad option," May 2)? Does it dawn on anyone on the left who supports this president and this leftist administration what the future impact of high-grade weaponry will be on the Jewish state once the Syrian problems are settled and all these Israeli-hating Syrian terrorists and rebels have U.S. arms?
TRAVEL
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2011
A Baltimore man of Egyptian origin was being held Thursday at the Anne Arundel County Detention Center after having been arrested at BWI Marshall Airport last week, when police said they stopped a man with 13 knives in his possession, authorities said. Amr Gamal Shedid, 24, of the 3200 block of N. Charles St., was in custody on $10,000 bail after Transportation Security Administration agents said they detected 13 knives in a passenger's carry-on luggage at the Pier D checkpoint on July 7, authorities said.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Just a few weeks ago, Ravens veteran tight end Owen Daniels ' status was very much in doubt. When a chronic hamstring problem sidelined the two-time Pro Bowl selection for the majority of the preseason, Daniels insisted that he knew how his body was responding and was adamant that he would be just fine. Daniels is looking mighty accurate in his self-assessment. He caught a pair of touchdown passes Thursday night in a 26-6 win over the Pittsburgh Steelers in a key AFC North game at M&T Bank Stadium.
NEWS
September 4, 2014
Regarding a reader's question about why police officers shoot to kill, Baltimore City police and most other departments train there officers to shoot at the target's center of mass, which is the largest part of the body and where the bullet has the most stopping power ( "Why do police always shoot to kill?" Aug. 29). Shooting at the center of mass does not always result in the suspect being killed. Officers assigned to specialized units such as SWAT teams and given additional firearms training may attempt to shoot a suspect in the leg or arm. However, these units are usually the last ones on the scene and most police involved shootings are over in a matter of minutes.
NEWS
August 21, 2014
The announcement this week that scientists from Aberdeen Proving Ground have successfully completed the destruction of Syria's most dangerous chemical weapons has left the whole world breathing a little easier. If nothing else it ensures these cruel instruments of mass destruction will never be used against the U.S. or its allies - or against the Syrian people, who have been the main victims of the country's four-year civil war, which already has claimed more than 100,000 lives. Make no mistake: Syrian President Bashar al-Assad didn't turn over his country's chemical weapons to international inspectors last year out of any humanitarian impulse.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2014
A team of scientists from Aberdeen Proving Ground has completed the historic mission of destroying the most dangerous of Syria's declared chemical weapons stocks, Pentagon officials said Monday. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel called Navy Capt. Rich Dromerhauser on Monday morning to congratulate the team of some 64 civilians and contractors aboard the MV Cape Ray, Pentagon spokesman Rear Adm. John Kirby said. The chemists and engineers from the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground worked for more than a month aboard the specially fitted container ship to neutralize 600 tons of chemicals, including the World War I blister agent sulfur mustard and the sarin precursor DF. Officials have said the first-ever shipboard destruction of the weapons, performed under heavy international guard in the Mediterranean Sea, could serve as a model for future efforts to eradicate chemical weapons from the world's arsenals.
NEWS
August 13, 2014
U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake's decision Tuesday upholding Maryland's ban on assault weapons and large-capacity ammunition magazines almost certainly won't be the last word on the subject. The gun advocates who sued to overturn the ban won't be satisfied until they've heard from the Supreme Court, nor likely will their compatriots from four other states where courts have come to the same conclusion as Judge Blake. But her ruling provides a clear analysis of why the state's interest in banning these weapons outweighs the individuals' interest in owning them, even under the expansive view of the Second Amendment the Supreme Court embraced several years ago. No matter how often gun rights advocates like to quote the phrase "shall not be infringed" from the Second Amendment, even the current Supreme Court, which overturned a century of precedent in its determination that the amendment conveys an individual rather than a collective right, recognizes that it has limits.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
A 41-year-old man told Baltimore Police he was attacked in a robbery try by a group of teenagers - one who was wielding a medieval weapon. According to a police report, the man said he was sitting in the grass in Patterson Park next to the baseball field on Thursday night at about 8 p.m. when four juveniles, about 14 to 16 years old, came up to him. One of them was wielding a "ball and chain," and struck him in the face as the others stood by,...
NEWS
February 21, 1991
The Judiciary Committee of the House of Delegates will soon vote on two much needed bills aimed at protecting people from firearms. Neither bill will unduly burden responsible citizens who want firearms for protection, hunting or target shooting. We urge the committee to approve the bills and send them to the full house.The first bill would ban sale or other transfer of specified assault type-weapons in Maryland beginning this year and limit possession of such weapons to adults with permits beginning next year.
NEWS
March 27, 1991
Just two weeks ago the legislative attempt to place reasonable new legal controls on assault weapons was thought to be as dead as the most recent victim of one of those alleged "sporting" weapons.But maybe not.Though the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee killed one version of the bill, the House of Delegates was passing its own version, by a decisive 80-55 vote. That House bill can now be taken up by the Senate -- if, that is, it can get out of committee.Both the House and Senate bills called for a ban on future sale of these terror weapons and for a limit on magazine size, no more than 20 bullets to a clip.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Lawyers for the state and gun rights advocates debated in federal court Tuesday about the government's power to hem in the Second Amendment to ward off mass shootings. Spectators crammed into a federal courtroom in downtown Baltimore to watch the hearing regarding bans on the sale or sharing of assault rifles and magazines capable of holding more than 10 rounds. Those provisions, which took effect in October, were among a package of measures enacted to strengthen Maryland's gun laws after 26 people were killed in an elementary school shooting in Newtown, Conn.
BUSINESS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
The founder of an embattled Sparks-based insurance company appears to have been plotting to kill a Delaware judge overseeing the liquidation of his business, recording himself on a trip to scout out his targets and acquiring a cache of weapons, federal authorities allege in court filings. Jeffrey B. Cohen, 39, of Reisterstown was arrested last month after he was indicted on charges that he schemed to make it appear that his company, Indemnity Insurance Corp., which insured bars and nightclubs, had millions of dollars in cash it did not possess.
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