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By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 24, 1991
At 8:45 Friday morning, with rain falling out of a leaden sky, Johnny Dark's upper lip starts to quiver in spite of itself."I'm OK," he says, but then his eyes start to betray him, and he removes his glasses and dabs at them with a handkerchief."
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
Danial "Danny" Reese, a former Baltimore broadcaster who was known as "Old Blue Eyes" and whose radio career spanned two decades, died April 28 from a heart attack at his Naples, Fla., home. He was 61. "I got to know Danny when we worked together at WCAO. We did mornings together and just clicked," said Ron Matz, a veteran Baltimore radio personality who is now a WJZ-TV reporter. "We were both friends on and off the air and remained so," said Mr. Matz. ""Danny was a very popular on-air personality who got Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Eric Siegel | November 23, 1991
Some said they felt like crying. One suggested the staff play Johnny Paycheck's "Take This Job And Shove It." Most just wanted to say goodbye and thank you.That was the reaction yesterday of WCAO-AM (600) listeners to the station's plans to change its format from country to black gospel and fire its seven-person on-air staff, led by local radio institution Johnny Dark."The phones have been going crazy," said Mr. Dark during his last on-air shift yesterday afternoon.In the smooth baritone voice that has graced the station for the past 30 years, the last nine with a country format, he honored some final song requests and traded a few memories, took condolences from distraught listeners and offered consolation in return.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2011
Theodore R. "Ted" Jaffee, a veteran broadcaster whose career in both local radio and TV spanned nearly 40 years, died Monday from complications of a stroke at Aston Gardens, a Naples, Fla., assisted-living facility. The former Lutherville resident was 92. "Ted was probably the classiest person I ever worked with. He was the consummate professional," said Johnny Dark, legendary Baltimore radio personality, who worked with Mr. Jaffee at WCAO. "There was no ego, and he was warm and friendly.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2001
Thomas B. Ingram, a pioneer of Baltimore radio broadcasting, died Tuesday of cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. He was 80 and had moved from Woodlawn to Oak Crest Village in Parkville in 1997. A radio engineer at WITH and WCAO, he also read poetry for the midnight program "Nocturne," popular in the 1940s, which was broadcast from the Parkway Theatre's stage. Family members said that in his 40 years in local radio he enjoyed setting up live remote broadcasts, such as radio coverage of the Preakness Stakes at Pimlico each spring and Baltimore Colts legend Johnny Unitas' final games at Memorial Stadium.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | October 5, 1990
ODDS 'N' ENDS OFF THE BROADCAST BEAMS:* Continuing one of the more unusual approaches to teaching reading, a new cycle of reading-by-radio lessons begins this weekend on WCAO-AM 600. "Project L.I.F.E." (for Literacy Is For Everyone) can be heard at 11 a.m. Sundays on the country music station, and also begins a new series Oct. 14 at 6:45 a.m. Sundays on affiliated station WXYV-FM 102.7 (V-103).Launched on WCAO in February 1989 and adapted from a similar program designed for cable television, the project is the work of Ken Bourne, a professor at Essex Community College who tailored his phonetic reading method to a broadcast format using familiar words to illustrate sounds.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | November 22, 1991
DISK JOCKEY Johnny Dark, an institution on Baltimore radio for more than 30 years, got his pink slip yesterday from WCAO Radio 60 as the station prepared to switch from country music to an all-gospel format Monday morning.Today was Dark's last day on the air.The changeover, dictated by fading ratings, according to station officials, has also cashiered on-air personalities Ron Matz, R.C. Allen, Brenda Bissett, Tom Conroy and Danny Reese.They will finish their work for the station with their final shows today or this weekend.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff Also contributing to this story were Phil Jackman, Steve McKerrow and Linell Smith | November 22, 1991
WCAO Radio 60, an award-winning country music station with veteran Baltimore on-air personalities, announced this morning that it will change to an all-gospel format on Monday.Disk jockey Johnny Dark, an institution on Baltimore radio for more than 30 years, got his pink slip yesterday, and today was Dark's last day on the air. He planned his last show, from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m., as a goodbye for his fans and listeners."I'm more concerned about the people listening to us than about myself," he said this morning.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
Danial "Danny" Reese, a former Baltimore broadcaster who was known as "Old Blue Eyes" and whose radio career spanned two decades, died April 28 from a heart attack at his Naples, Fla., home. He was 61. "I got to know Danny when we worked together at WCAO. We did mornings together and just clicked," said Ron Matz, a veteran Baltimore radio personality who is now a WJZ-TV reporter. "We were both friends on and off the air and remained so," said Mr. Matz. ""Danny was a very popular on-air personality who got Baltimore.
FEATURES
August 6, 1991
WCAO-AM is looking for local country western groups to participate in the "WCAO Country Music Roundup." Bands must send a tape and group information to the station by Aug. 9. The station will then select bands to play in semi-finals on Aug. 28 at the Maryland State Fair; the finals, hosted by WCAO's Brenda Bissett and featuring a panel of celebrity judges, will take place at the fairgrounds on Aug. 29.The winning group will open for Tammy Wynette at her...
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | September 22, 2007
Jack Edwards' voice filled the nights on Baltimore AM radio for decades when he was a disc jockey during the golden years of rock 'n' roll. Now 69, Edwards can't let go of the music he loves. Technically retired, he keeps his hand on the 45-rpm record player Friday nights at Tully's restaurant in Putty Hill and spins the vinyl platters he has been collecting since he was a student at Kenwood Senior High School. "I want them dancing. Why play a song that nobody can dance to?" he said the other day from his Reisterstown home.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2005
Bob Bartel, a veteran radio sports broadcaster and former disc jockey who would tell his listeners on WCAO-AM in the 1960s, "Don't be late for your Saturday night date," died of heart disease Saturday at York General Hospital. He was 74. Mr. Bartel's voice was well-known in the Baltimore area from his nearly 30 years on the air at the station -- from 1962 until its format change to gospel music in 1991. Fellow broadcasters recalled his breezy, calm style, and the authoritative voice with which he would occasionally announce the time by saying, "It's a quarter of eight and don't be late for your eight o'clock date."
NEWS
August 17, 2003
CARROLL C. LARKIN, of Miami, Florida and Carolina Beach, North Carolina died on August 15, 2003, in Miami, Florida; beloved husband of Fay Larkin. Survived by his son Michael Larkin, of Miami, Florida; daughter Melissa Larkin, of Reisterstown, Maryland, and Larry, Tammy and Lindsay Anvik, of Rye, New York. He was Senior Vice President of Spanish Broadcasting System (SBS) and had been with them for the last 15 years. He began his broadcasting career in the 1950's as a sales manager for WCAO in Baltimore, Maryland, his hometown.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2001
Thomas B. Ingram, a pioneer of Baltimore radio broadcasting, died Tuesday of cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. He was 80 and had moved from Woodlawn to Oak Crest Village in Parkville in 1997. A radio engineer at WITH and WCAO, he also read poetry for the midnight program "Nocturne," popular in the 1940s, which was broadcast from the Parkway Theatre's stage. Family members said that in his 40 years in local radio he enjoyed setting up live remote broadcasts, such as radio coverage of the Preakness Stakes at Pimlico each spring and Baltimore Colts legend Johnny Unitas' final games at Memorial Stadium.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1998
It may not rank up there with introducing the Beatles, but it's an honor nonetheless.Local radio legend Johnny Dark, whose early-'60s radio program on WCAO helped introduce the British Invasion to Baltimore, will be commended for a lifetime of achievement as part of the second annual Achievement in Radio awards, organized by local radio stations and the March of Dimes.Dark, a native of Cambridge, Mass., had already established himself as a major force in radio by the time he signed with WCAO (600 AM)
BUSINESS
By J. Leffall and J. Leffall,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1998
Jacor Communications Inc. will end up with three Baltimore radio stations as part of a $620 million merger deal approved by federal regulators yesterday, giving the Covington, Ky., company its first foothold in the Baltimore market.Jacor will assume control of Baltimore's WOCT-104.3 FM and WCAO-600 AM. In exchange, Jacor will relinquish stations in Minneapolis and Columbus, Ohio, to CBS Radio.The trade is part of an agreement to sell or swap eight of its stations to settle antitrust concerns raised by its acquisition of Columbus, Ohio-based Nationwide Communication Inc.Jacor also is acquiring WPOC-93.
SPORTS
By Nestor Aparicio | October 11, 1991
VS. N.Y. RANGERS* WHEN: Tonight, 7:35.* WHERE: Capital Centre.* TV/RADIO: HTS; WCAO-AM 600.VS. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS* WHEN: Tomorrow, 7:35.* WHERE: Capital Centre.* TV/RADIO: HTS; WCAO-AM 600.* OUTLOOK: The Capitals (3-0), who are off to their best start ever, have a chance to put some room between themselves and the rest of the Patrick Division with a pair of home games this weekend. Both Mike Liut and Jim Hrivnak have been solid in goal, and coach Terry Murray said he plans to continue a platoon system.
SPORTS
February 13, 1996
Loyola (8-11) at Fairfield (13-7)Site: Alumni Hall, Fairfield, Conn.Time: 7:30Radio: WCAO (600 AM)Outlook: The Greyhounds put forth a commendable effort Saturday night in a 72-67 loss to Canisius, which left Loyola at 5-3 and tied with Fairfield for third in the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference. Sophomore G Mike Powell (19.6 ppg), the MAAC's second-leading scorer, had a career-high 34 points, the most by a Greyhound in five years. Loyola needs freshmen Duane Johnson and Nsilo Abraham to stay out of foul trouble, something the two front-court players couldn't do against Canisius.
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