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FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2003
The news director of WBAL-TV announced yesterday that she would leave the station, saying personal ties were luring her back to Philadelphia. "I have decided to quit, for the first time in my crazy career, to care about my personal life," Margaret Cronan said yesterday in an interview. She said she decided to move to avoid the long-distance relationship she has been maintaining with her boyfriend, who lives there. Cronan, 38, also referred to job opportunities that are likely to arise in Philadelphia once her current contract ends.
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BUSINESS
By Eric Siegel | January 10, 1991
David J. Barrett, vice president and general manager of Hearst Corp.-owned WBAL-TV and radio stations WBAL-AM and WIYY-FM, was named yesterday to the newly created position of deputy general manager of broadcasting for Hearst.Mr. Barrett will assume his new responsibilities immediately but will continue to oversee Hearst's Baltimore broadcast properties until a successor is chosen, which he said will take four to six weeks.The company will first look within its own ranks to replace Mr. Barrett but also will consider other candidates, he said.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 3, 1996
Jim Mustard, a veteran WBAL-TV news reporter and editor who was known for his insightful, sensitive and detailed reporting and his courageous battle against cancer and AIDS, died yesterday of complications from the illnesses at his home in the Broadview Apartments. He was 51.Mr. Mustard, who in his 23 years with WBAL covered City Hall, the State House and transportation, retired in 1993 due to illness. In 1984, he had been diagnosed with bone cancer and given six months to live, and in 1992 was diagnosed with AIDS.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1995
News/talk/sports station WBAL -AM (1090) moved past country-music outlet WPOC-FM (93.1) for the first time in a year, while local listeners also seemed to develop a stronger taste for oldies rock music, according to the summer radio ratings results.The Arbitron numbers for the period June through September, ** among all listeners 12 and older, reversed the WBAL-WPOC standings that had prevailed since the 1994 summer quarter, when the major-league baseball strike wiped out WBAL's traditional summer drawing card.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer Staff writer David Zurawik contributed to this article | May 5, 1992
Orioles instructor Rick Dempsey will be doing a little moonlighting while he waits to see which way his baseball career will turn.Dempsey has accepted a job with WBAL, which will mean doing pre-game and post-game television reports, doing a morning radio show and working as a television field reporter. He said it will not have any effect on his status with the Orioles."Definitely not," he said yesterday. "As a matter of fact, they are working around my baseball career. I hadn't been thinking about [broadcasting]
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | April 1, 1992
A thoughtful pun hides within the title of "The Family Works!" a new local production on WBAL (Channel 11) tonight.For it takes work to make a family work, and the WBAL program launches a two-year public affairs campaign aimed at supporting families in a time when they face extraordinary stress.Tonight's program (at 8 o'clock) begins with a half-hour taped presentation featuring actress Ann Jillian, produced by WBAL's sister Hearst Broadcasting station WCVB-TV in Boston. It explores three different family structures, a working couple, a second marriage/stepchild relationship and a multi-generational, manless family.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | April 29, 1992
Dr. Benjamin L. Hooks is coming to Baltimore television.WBAL (Channel 11) yesterday announced that the 67-year-old executive director of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) is joining Channel 11 as a political analyst. His debut will be at noon today with a piece on the Pennsylvania primary."The 1992 election season is shaping up to be one of the most interesting in history . . . and there are a number of developments in the campaign where the insight of Dr. Hooks will prove to be beneficial," said David Roberts, the station's associate news director.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | October 24, 1990
Chuck Thompson spent part of yesterday afternoon addressing a group of retirees. Today, he very well could decide to separate himself from their ranks.Thompson, 69, who retired from Baltimore Orioles television play-by-play after 1987, but worked about 25 Orioles games on WBAL Radio as a fill-in this year, said he expects to tell WBAL today whether he will return next season in an even larger role.Thompson said yesterday: "I have not signed. I have not agreed. We [he and representative Ron Shapiro]
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 1, 1995
Ellen Sauerbrey's seven-week stint as a radio talk show host )) left her wanting more."If things work well for me . . . I'll be greatly looking forward to coming back on in the fall," the former Republican gubernatorial candidate said yesterday, before her final 8-11 broadcast last night on WBAL-AM (1090)."I've gotten great feedback. If calls mean anything, I've got a great audience," she said, adding, "three hours of being able to say what's on your mind isn't bad."On Monday, Orioles broadcaster Jon Miller begins a nightly sports conversation show in the time slot -- at least until the strike ends and baseball action returns.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | December 25, 1992
Talk show host Larry King's plan to move his two-way conversations from late-night to mid-afternoon in February will cost him his berth on Baltimore's big WBAL-AM (1090). And it remains to be seen whether local listeners will be able to hear him at all."It's a shame. We had every intention of keeping Larry King on overnight, but he will not air on WBAL in the afternoon," says station vice president and general manager Jeff Beauchamp.Taking the King show in its planned 3 to 6 p.m. slot Feb. 1, he says, would mean cutting back on "The Ron Smith Show," heard now from 1 to 4 p.m., and eliminating two hours of the station's news roundup that begins at 4 p.m."
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