Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWbal Am
IN THE NEWS

Wbal Am

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK | July 22, 2006
Riding a strong climate of local news stories and a surprising performance by Orioles baseball, radio station WBAL-AM added 55,000 viewers to its weekly audience, according to figures released yesterday by the Arbitron ratings service. The station's surge -- the most dynamic development in the survey that measured listenership from March to June -- moved the 50,000-watt news and talk station from fifth to third in overall audience size among viewers 12 years and older. Urban-contemporary WERQ-FM and country-themed WPOC-FM remained the top two stations.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
After 45 years in the radio business, Ed Kiernan Friday told the staff at WBAL that he will be retiring this summer as vice president and general manager of radio stations WBAL-AM and WIYY-FM. “Having closely worked with Ed for all these years, I know firsthand how he has enhanced all aspects of the radio business he has managed with his enthusiasm, good humor and leadership,” Hearst Television President Jordan Wertlieb wrote in statement.  “With Ed at the helm, WBAL has been among the nation's most honored radio stations and a major community force through the WBAL Radio Kids Campaign.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1998
For Chuck Jackson, taking over as morning news anchor on WBAL-AM (1090) is simply a matter of returning home. And, he adds, it's about time."It's just really great to be back in the business I guess I never should have left for public relations work," says Jackson, a WBAL alumnus who's a familiar voice to journalists throughout Maryland, having spent seven years as spokesman for the state police.Jackson, 47, will take over for the semi-retiring Alan Walden July 13. The two men will share the morning airwaves the week of July 6-10; after that, Jackson will take over the 5 a.m.-9 a.m. shift, with Walden continuing his commentaries ("Walden Ponderings")
SPORTS
By Dean Jones Jr and The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
The Orioles and WBAL-AM 1090 announced Tuesday that 14 of the team's spring training games will be broadcast on the station this year. The schedule begins with the spring training opener on the road against the Tampa Bay Rays in Port Charlotte, Fla., on Feb. 28 at 1:05 p.m. The next day, the team's flagship station will also carry the home opener at Ed Smith Stadium in Sarasota, Fla., against the Toronto Blue Jays at 1:05 p.m. Three of the...
BUSINESS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 2, 1991
Hearst Broadcasting named new general managers for its Baltimore television and radio stations yesterday.Philip M. Stolz, 43, was named general manager of WBAL-TV (Channel 11). Edward C. Kiernan, 42, is the new general manager of the WBAL-AM and WIYY-FM radio stations. The two replace David Barrett, who was promoted last month to deputy director of all Hearst Broadcasting properties.Mr. Stolz comes to Channel 11 from WDTN-TV, the ABC affiliate in Dayton, Ohio, where he was general manager.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | July 16, 1991
For radio station WBAL-AM (1090), springtime is definitely the right time.WBAL, boosted by its broadcast of Baltimore Oriole baseball games, finished first in the spring Arbitron ratings released yesterday -- the third spring in a row it has finished first in the ratings.The news/talk station got a 9.0 share of listeners age 12 and over, up from 8.6 in the winter, narrowly beating out urban contemporary station WXYV-FM (V-103), which had finished first in three of the last four ratings books.
NEWS
October 4, 2006
William "Bill" Neal, who had a morning program on radio station WBAL-AM in the mid-1960s, died of Alzheimer's disease complications Sunday at Stella Maris Hospice. The Timonium resident was 81. Born in Augusta, Ga., and raised in New York City and Lumberton, N.C., he served in the Army in India, Burma and China during World War II. He attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and worked at small radio stations before moving to New York and becoming a television announcer at NBC. He moved to Washington and worked at Voice of America before holding jobs in Baltimore at WBAL and WCBM-AM in the 1960s.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | July 22, 1995
The country music of WPOC-FM (93.1) edged out the news, talk and Orioles baseball of WBAL-AM (1090) in the spring quarter radio ratings, and officials at both stations say the long baseball players' strike may have been a factor.The Arbitron audience figures for all listeners 12 and older gave WPOC the narrowest of victories, 0.1 "share" for the months of April through June. (One share represents about 3,600 listeners in an average quarter-hour.)The ranking reverses the pattern of recent years in which WBAL reigned strongly in first place during the baseball season because of its Orioles games.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | January 13, 1993
Radio station WBAL-AM (1090) held the top position in the fall ratings, but just barely. Without Orioles baseball for most of the ratings period, the talk/news station heard the country music sound of WPOC-FM (93.1) twanging loudly just behind.The country music station, in fact, ranked first in the Arbitron measurements of adult listeners in the 25-to-54 age group, and was second and third, respectively, in the ratings for women and men 18 and older."It's been a good year for us," said WPOC program director Robert Moody.
NEWS
January 16, 1994
Let's see if we have this straight. First WBAL-AM radio steals Rush Limbaugh, America's favorite talk-show host, from WCBM-AM. Not to be outdone, WCBM hires Alan Keyes, the black conservative Republican who self-immolated in attempting to unseat Sen. Barbara Mikulski in 1992. CBM puts the glib Mr. Keyes on in the morning; BAL puts the blowhard (but wildly popular) Mr. Limbaugh on in the afternoon but on a delayed basis, so no Baltimorean can hope to get a call through to his program, heard on more than 600 stations.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Orioles radio broadcasts will remain on WBAL-AM 1090 for at least the next two seasons. The club and the station have finalized a multiyear deal for WBAL to remain the Orioles' radio affiliate, according to an industry source. It is believed to be a two-year pact. Joe Angel and Fred Manfra, who have called Orioles radio broadcasts together since 2004, will also return, the source added. A previous three-year deal with WBAL expired at the end of this season. Specifics of the deal are not known, but it is structured as a revenue-sharing partnership between the two sides.  The Orioles don't plan to make a formal announcement on the new deal.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 25, 2011
Lawrence T. Doyle, a retired WBAL-AM and WIYY-FM sales manager, died Aug. 12 of lymphoma at Franklin Square Medical Center. The Parkville resident was 78. The son of a Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. credit manager and a homemaker, he was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. He was a 1950 graduate of City College and in 1952 enlisted in the Marine Corps, where he was trained as an air traffic controller. After being discharged in 1955, he went to work as an insurance salesman for Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. in Baltimore.
NEWS
February 9, 2011
A few years ago while working outside Washington, I was attempting to tune in an Orioles' afternoon game on my car radio. This was an FM frequency, the flagship station. Imagine my frustration at not being able to receive the broadcast, a mere 40 miles outside Baltimore. I was elated to hear the news yesterday that Orioles baseball broadcasts are coming back to WBAL-AM in Baltimore ( "Orioles headed back to WBAL after four seasons at 105.7 FM," Feb. 8). It's where the Os belong, having listened to hundreds of games from what will be the flagship station once again.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2011
After a four-season run on 105.7 The Fan, Orioles radio broadcasts are returning to WBAL-AM 1090, the Hearst-owned station that has had a partnership with the club for much of the past six decades. The three-year contract, which comes after the club shopped its radio rights for several months, is somewhat surprising considering the rocky parting between the Orioles and WBAL after the 2006 season as well as the trend among professional sports franchises to switch from high-wattage AM stations to multi-platform FM clusters.
NEWS
October 4, 2006
William "Bill" Neal, who had a morning program on radio station WBAL-AM in the mid-1960s, died of Alzheimer's disease complications Sunday at Stella Maris Hospice. The Timonium resident was 81. Born in Augusta, Ga., and raised in New York City and Lumberton, N.C., he served in the Army in India, Burma and China during World War II. He attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and worked at small radio stations before moving to New York and becoming a television announcer at NBC. He moved to Washington and worked at Voice of America before holding jobs in Baltimore at WBAL and WCBM-AM in the 1960s.
FEATURES
By DAVID ZURAWIK | July 22, 2006
Riding a strong climate of local news stories and a surprising performance by Orioles baseball, radio station WBAL-AM added 55,000 viewers to its weekly audience, according to figures released yesterday by the Arbitron ratings service. The station's surge -- the most dynamic development in the survey that measured listenership from March to June -- moved the 50,000-watt news and talk station from fifth to third in overall audience size among viewers 12 years and older. Urban-contemporary WERQ-FM and country-themed WPOC-FM remained the top two stations.
NEWS
March 19, 2006
Probe opened on city contract The state prosecutor's office has opened an investigation into the Baltimore City Council's computer services contract. Rate phase-in gains support A plan to limit Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. rate increases to 15 percent this summer with the remainder of the 72 percent increase phased in over three years gained momentum among legislators reacting to a public uproar over the end of rate caps. Ehrlich proposes tuition freeze Tuition rates at Maryland public universities would be frozen next year under a plan unveiled by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., giving parents and students a break after years of increases in the cost of higher education.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Orioles radio broadcasts will remain on WBAL-AM 1090 for at least the next two seasons. The club and the station have finalized a multiyear deal for WBAL to remain the Orioles' radio affiliate, according to an industry source. It is believed to be a two-year pact. Joe Angel and Fred Manfra, who have called Orioles radio broadcasts together since 2004, will also return, the source added. A previous three-year deal with WBAL expired at the end of this season. Specifics of the deal are not known, but it is structured as a revenue-sharing partnership between the two sides.  The Orioles don't plan to make a formal announcement on the new deal.
NEWS
March 19, 2006
Probe opened on city contract The state prosecutor's office has opened an investigation into the Baltimore City Council's computer services contract. Rate phase-in gains support A plan to limit Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. rate increases to 15 percent this summer with the remainder of the 72 percent increase phased in over three years gained momentum among legislators reacting to a public uproar over the end of rate caps. Ehrlich proposes tuition freeze Tuition rates at Maryland public universities would be frozen next year under a plan unveiled by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., giving parents and students a break after years of increases in the cost of higher education.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.