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By Roger Simon and Roger Simon,Sun Columnist | June 5, 1994
CHICAGO -- On the morning of the worst day of his life, on the day he would be called a swindler, a thief and a liar on national television, Dan Rostenkowski sat alone, connected to the world only by a telephone.A call came in from a well-wisher, not an important call, just another call from the legion of people who owed something to Rostenkowski, to Rosty, to the chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee.Rosty took the call and, to the surprise of the caller, he did not seem down in the dumps.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Dozens of star-struck lawmakers flocked to an Annapolis wine bar Friday evening to meet Kevin Spacey, star of the Netflix series “House of Cards,” and to hear a pitch for  a generous tax credit that would keep its production in Maryland. Delaying their usual rush to get out of town on Fridays, senator and delegates of both parties dropped by to meet and greet the Oscar-winning actor at a private reception. The real Annapolis politicians couldn't wait to  get a glimpse of the man who may be the nation's most popular fake Washington politician - the scheming and unscrupulous Frank Underwood.
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NEWS
December 10, 1992
Delegate Huff joins panel on Ways and MeansDelegate W. Ray Huff, a District 31 Democrat, will have a new committee assignment when the legislature meets next month.Mr. Huff was transferred from the Environmental Matters Committee, which he joined last year, to the Ways and Means Committee. Ways and Means considers business and tax reform.Mr. Huff, 57, is chairman of the Commission to Save Lighthouses and a commissioner with the Anne Arundel County Housing Authority. He is active in the American Cancer Society, Explorer Scouts and the YMCA.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | April 9, 2012
The House Ways and Means Committee passed a bill that would allow gambling in Prince George's County and table games at all Maryland casinos on a 14 to 4 vote. Four members abstained. Prince George's County Executive Rushern Baker said that he likes the bill. "If this is the product that gets passed, I will be happy," Baker said. He said he is "very comfortable" that the bill would allow a high-end casino at National Harbor. Joe Weinberg, a top official at the Cordish Company, said he wants the bill to fail.
NEWS
February 25, 2003
Today's highlights 10 a.m.Senate meets, Senate chamber. 10 a.m.House of Delegates meets, House chamber. 1 p.m.House Ways and Means Committee, hearing on bills to legalize slot machines, Joint Hearing Room, Legislative Services Building.
NEWS
April 15, 1995
Also, an article in April 5 editions of The Sun incorrectly stated the committee chairmanship of state Del. Howard P. Rawlings. He is chairman of the Appropriations Committee of the House of Delegates. The chairwoman of the Ways and Means Committee is Del. Sheila E. Hixson.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2001
It was more about symbolism than substance, but a legislative committee voted yesterday to consider legalizing slot machines in Maryland, the first of what could be many such votes in coming years. The House Appropriations Committee, under pressure from its chairman, Del. Howard P. Rawlings, voted to urge another House committee to take up the issue of slots before the legislature adjourns April 9. Rawlings, a Baltimore Democrat, is the chief sponsor of a bill that would legalize slots at four sites in Maryland if approved by voters in a referendum next year.
NEWS
November 12, 2007
A bill containing the individual and corporate income tax provisions and an attempt to make sure corporations pay taxes on their profits in Maryland passed the House of Delegates early yesterday, 82-55. A separate measure increasing the sales tax and the car-titling tax rates from 5 percent to 6 percent, doubling the tobacco tax to $2 a pack, and raising the hotel tax passed 80-56. Similar measures passed the state Senate last week. The House and Senate must now reconcile the differences between their versions of O'Malley's budget-balancing package, but legislative leaders don't anticipate difficulty.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Michelle Deal-Zimmerman,Sun reporter | August 5, 2007
Many Marylanders are keen on vacations, but, judging from the results of our first Travel reader survey, we all seem to go our own way. Older travelers head for Europe, while younger ones seek out major U.S. cities. Families with kids go to the beach. Some travelers prefer a solo, quiet trip, while others look forward to going with a group. More than 500 readers responded to our survey about travel habits. Readers who answered the survey were enthusiastic about travel - 80 percent had a valid passport - and 96 percent plan to take a vacation trip before the year is out. And, in follow-up interviews, several readers said getting there is part of the fun. But how you reach your destination is a matter of personal choice.
NEWS
April 5, 2007
Bill would restrict scholarship program Prohibiting state legislators from giving scholarships to their relatives or to the families of their colleagues would help restore public trust in the General Assembly, an Anne Arundel County senator told a House of Delegates committee yesterday. Sen. Bryan W. Simonaire, a Republican who sponsored a bill restricting the $11-million-a-year legislative scholarship program, said lawmakers should be held to the same ethical standards when doling out scholarships that they are when hiring staff.
NEWS
October 15, 2006
Today, The Sun begins its endorsements for the Nov. 7 general election with the race for U.S. Senate. Against almost any election opponent imaginable, this newspaper would be strongly inclined to support Benjamin L. Cardin. Certainly against Republican Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele and Green-Populist-Libertarian candidate Kevin Zeese, we are convinced that Mr. Cardin is the best choice to represent Maryland in the U.S. Senate and that he will serve both Maryland and the nation by helping to shape consensus on some of the most nettlesome but momentous issues of the era. During 40 years of service in the state legislature as well as in Congress, Mr. Cardin has displayed a rare combination of keen intellect and practical horse-trading skills that marked him for leadership in every arena he entered.
NEWS
By RICHARD B. SCHMITT and RICHARD B. SCHMITT,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 17, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The House voted yesterday to strip Democratic Rep. William J. Jefferson of Louisiana of a powerful committee assignment, while an effort by the embattled Democrat to fight a search of his Capitol Hill office ran into a skeptical federal judge. The voice vote - without debate or dissent - to expel Jefferson from the tax-writing Ways and Means Committee appears to be the first time the House has taken such a step against a member who has not been charged with a crime. The vote against Jefferson, who is the target of a federal bribery investigation, was infused with issues of race and election-year politics, as well as the reality of Justice Department investigations that have snagged members of both parties.
NEWS
February 23, 2006
House of Delegates convenes at 10 a.m. Senate convenes at 10 a.m. Hearings of interest: The House Environment Matters Committee holds a working session on eminent domain issues. The meeting is scheduled to begin at 11 a.m. in the Lowe House Office Building committee room. The House Health and Government Operations and Ways and Means committees hold a joint hearing on a bill (HB 3) to create a scholarship program for military veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan.
BUSINESS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | July 1, 2005
WASHINGTON - The Senate narrowly approved a free trade agreement yesterday between the United States and five Central American countries plus the Dominican Republic. The House Ways and Means Committee, voting largely along party lines, also approved the agreement known as CAFTA, setting up a showdown vote in the House this month. The 54-45 Senate vote came after two days of largely partisan debate on the trade agreement hammered out by the Bush administration with Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2005
Benjamin L. Cardin, the studious congressman from Baltimore County who has spent his political career mastering fiscal issues such as Medicare reform, announced yesterday that he is running for the U.S. Senate. Flanked by family members and many city and suburban elected officials, the 10-term Democrat declared his candidacy during a morning speech at the Baltimore Museum of Industry on Key Highway, then repeated his announcement at events in Frederick and Montgomery County. He said the waterfront backdrop in Baltimore, with million-dollar condominiums under construction blocks away, symbolized his commitment to the environment and better jobs.
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