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Waylon Jennings

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By Kathryn Straach and Kathryn Straach,Dallas Morning News | June 28, 1992
DALLAS -- Waylon Jennings may sing about Luckenback, but he has a song in his heart for Littlefield, Texas -- his hometown.Mr. Jennings, wife Jessi Colter and their son, Shooter, will return Fourth of July weekend to the small Texas town, 38 miles northwest of Lubbock, where the country-western legend grew up. While there, he'll give a free outdoor concert, sign autographs and serve as parade marshal in the town's holiday festivities.Technically, the event is called Littlefield Celebration with Waylon Jennings.
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By Sun Staff | March 3, 2002
Now that a holler-ful of Grammy awards have made "real" country, bluegrass and American roots music officially cool, not to mention marketable, it surely won't be long before musical offerings like these will be showing up at a CD rack near you: * O Death Meets Ol' Blue Eyes: Ralph Stanley Sings the Sinatra Songbook -- If you loved Ralph's haunting rendition of "O Death" from the Coen Bros. O Brother Where Art Thou? (and who didn't love that movie?!), you'll love this new disc. Ralph's twangy interpretations make even "That's Why the Lady Is a Tramp" and "The Summer Wind" sound like "O Death" warmed over.
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By Michael Corcoran and Michael Corcoran,COX NEWS SERVICE | February 15, 2002
AUSTIN, Texas - He wore a black hat, flashed a don't-mess-with-me grin and rebelled against Nashville's glossy commercialism with such defiant songs as "Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way?" Waylon Jennings, the raging soul of outlaw country music, recorded 60 albums and had 16 No. 1 country singles in a career that spanned five decades and began when he played bass for Buddy Holly. Known for such modern classics as "Good Hearted Woman," "I've Always Been Crazy" and a series of hit duets in the 1970s with Willie Nelson, Jennings died Wednesday after a long battle with diabetes-related health problems.
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By Michael Corcoran and Michael Corcoran,COX NEWS SERVICE | February 15, 2002
AUSTIN, Texas - He wore a black hat, flashed a don't-mess-with-me grin and rebelled against Nashville's glossy commercialism with such defiant songs as "Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way?" Waylon Jennings, the raging soul of outlaw country music, recorded 60 albums and had 16 No. 1 country singles in a career that spanned five decades and began when he played bass for Buddy Holly. Known for such modern classics as "Good Hearted Woman," "I've Always Been Crazy" and a series of hit duets in the 1970s with Willie Nelson, Jennings died Wednesday after a long battle with diabetes-related health problems.
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By Sun Staff | March 3, 2002
Now that a holler-ful of Grammy awards have made "real" country, bluegrass and American roots music officially cool, not to mention marketable, it surely won't be long before musical offerings like these will be showing up at a CD rack near you: * O Death Meets Ol' Blue Eyes: Ralph Stanley Sings the Sinatra Songbook -- If you loved Ralph's haunting rendition of "O Death" from the Coen Bros. O Brother Where Art Thou? (and who didn't love that movie?!), you'll love this new disc. Ralph's twangy interpretations make even "That's Why the Lady Is a Tramp" and "The Summer Wind" sound like "O Death" warmed over.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | April 16, 1997
A federal jury convicted a Harford County defense contractor yesterday of bilking the government of more than $100,000 in false expense claims, a scheme that prosecutors said funneled money into his wife's fledgling country music career.The jury deliberated about six hours before finding Robert David Leas, 49, of Edgewood, guilty of making false claims to government officials and obstructing a federal audit. His Edgewood fuel-tank storage company, American Construction Services, was also tried criminally and was convicted of the same charges.
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By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | October 15, 1992
Mary Clum and Steve Boose used an updated version of "The Farmer in the Dell" to get musicians into their country-western band.The lead singer took a drummer, the lead guitarist took another guitar player, and so on until their band, Branded, brought in enough new members and created a sound that left no one standing alone."
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 20, 1995
Does television sneakily try to channel viewers into new patterns? Let us count the ways. Media education class is in session.* "The New VH1: It'll Suck You In" (WBAL, Channel 11) -- Lesson No. 1: Oh, what a tangled web they weave, when television is used to advertise other television. VH1, the softer-rock sister network of cable's MTV, launches an unprecedented $4 million prime-time ad campaign of 30-second spots appearing throughout the evening on the peacock network. Commercials would not ordinarily rate a highlight mention -- but rock superstars Madonna, Sting and Sheryl Crow are making rare, heavily promoted TV appearances in these.
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By SYLVIA BADGER | December 6, 1992
When Dixie Carter was in town last weekend to sing with the BSO, the "Designing Women" star was followed by a crew from "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous."They were shooting footage for a segment that will focus on Carter's singing career, which she juggles in addition to her TV appearances as Julia Sugarbaker. The versatile Carter travels around the country performing with orchestras as well as at New York City's posh Cafe Carlisle.Music is also part of Carter's home life, and her favorite recordings -- Luciano Pavarotti, Frank Sinatra and Waylon Jennings -- are as varied as her career.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | August 14, 1991
Think of it as MTV for Civil War buffs. Think of it as pretty great TV. Think of it as a show you don't want to miss if you are one of the millions who loved Ken Burns' "The Civil War.""Songs of the Civil War," at 7:30 tonight on MPT (Channels 22 and 67), is one of the sleepers of the summer. It's a companion piece to Burns' multipart documentary on the war that first aired last fall, and features contemporary pop musicians performing Civil War songs.The musicians include Judy Collins, John Hartford, Sweet Honey in the Rock, Hoyt Axton, Waylon Jennings, Richie Havens, Kathy Mattea, Kate and Anna McGarrigle, Ronnie Gilbert and Jay Ungar.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | April 16, 1997
A federal jury convicted a Harford County defense contractor yesterday of bilking the government of more than $100,000 in false expense claims, a scheme that prosecutors said funneled money into his wife's fledgling country music career.The jury deliberated about six hours before finding Robert David Leas, 49, of Edgewood, guilty of making false claims to government officials and obstructing a federal audit. His Edgewood fuel-tank storage company, American Construction Services, was also tried criminally and was convicted of the same charges.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 20, 1995
Does television sneakily try to channel viewers into new patterns? Let us count the ways. Media education class is in session.* "The New VH1: It'll Suck You In" (WBAL, Channel 11) -- Lesson No. 1: Oh, what a tangled web they weave, when television is used to advertise other television. VH1, the softer-rock sister network of cable's MTV, launches an unprecedented $4 million prime-time ad campaign of 30-second spots appearing throughout the evening on the peacock network. Commercials would not ordinarily rate a highlight mention -- but rock superstars Madonna, Sting and Sheryl Crow are making rare, heavily promoted TV appearances in these.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | December 6, 1992
When Dixie Carter was in town last weekend to sing with the BSO, the "Designing Women" star was followed by a crew from "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous."They were shooting footage for a segment that will focus on Carter's singing career, which she juggles in addition to her TV appearances as Julia Sugarbaker. The versatile Carter travels around the country performing with orchestras as well as at New York City's posh Cafe Carlisle.Music is also part of Carter's home life, and her favorite recordings -- Luciano Pavarotti, Frank Sinatra and Waylon Jennings -- are as varied as her career.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | October 15, 1992
Mary Clum and Steve Boose used an updated version of "The Farmer in the Dell" to get musicians into their country-western band.The lead singer took a drummer, the lead guitarist took another guitar player, and so on until their band, Branded, brought in enough new members and created a sound that left no one standing alone."
FEATURES
By Kathryn Straach and Kathryn Straach,Dallas Morning News | June 28, 1992
DALLAS -- Waylon Jennings may sing about Luckenback, but he has a song in his heart for Littlefield, Texas -- his hometown.Mr. Jennings, wife Jessi Colter and their son, Shooter, will return Fourth of July weekend to the small Texas town, 38 miles northwest of Lubbock, where the country-western legend grew up. While there, he'll give a free outdoor concert, sign autographs and serve as parade marshal in the town's holiday festivities.Technically, the event is called Littlefield Celebration with Waylon Jennings.
NEWS
March 6, 1991
Eleven-year-old country singer Kim Sigler will perform with her band Desert Wind at 7 p.m. Saturday, March 30, at the Odenton Fire Hall, Route 175.Cover charge for the show is $8 for adults and $6 for children younger than 13. Advance reservations may be obtained at a discount of $1.The Fredericksburg, Va., native first appeared in public May 1987at the Shriner's Temple in Fairfax, Va. She has appeared on a live television broadcast at RCC-TV in her hometown.More...
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By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2012
If you could care less about this year's Grammys (wouldn't blame you there) or the Allen Stone show at the 8x10 isn't your thing, there's the Umphrey's McGee show at Rams Head Live on Sunday night. I've made the mistake of calling Umphrey's a "jam band" - a label for bands I say I'm allergic to because I never got into Phish. But I have persistent friends (the same friends that drop whatever they're doing whenever Umphrey's McGee is in the area) that told me they weren't Phish-lite.
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