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NEWS
By Justin Fenton | justin.fenton@baltsun.com | December 23, 2009
The deputy director of the Great Blacks in Wax Museum, where a 20-year-old man was fatally stabbed during a fight at a party Friday night, said he was cutting ties with a local promoter who had described the parties to museum officials as Christian fundraisers. Fliers for the parties, posted on a Web page for Big Les Productions, describe them as events for young adults and "mature" high school students. Many of the posters show young men flashing what appear to be gang signs or raising their middle fingers, and promise a "sexy ladies dance contest."
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
A cadre of spiritual giants was inducted Saturday into the National Great Blacks in Wax Museum as the East Baltimore gallery looks to expand in its third decade. About 1,000 people gathered in Morgan State University's Murphy Fine Arts Center for a tribute ceremony honoring three pastors and a gospel singer for their roles inspiring the country through faith. "Thank God for blessing them so that they could bless others," Rep. Elijah Cummings told the audience. "I want to thank our honorees for changing the trajectory of so many people's destiny.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | April 22, 2001
The Engineers Club was packed with people, including three replicas thereof. The 500 real folks circulated through sitting rooms of the historic building catching up with old friends and snagging a bite from the buffet. In the ballroom, the three nonhuman guests of honor awaited their introductions in an unveiling ceremony presenting the newest additions to the Great Blacks in Wax Museum's collection. Two of the figures would also be greeting their flesh-and-blood counterparts -- Baltimore entrepreneur-philanthropists Osborne Payne and Harlow Fullwood Jr. Both were at the party, but they were not allowed to see their wax facsimiles until the official unveiling.
SPORTS
By Nicholas Fouriezos, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
Colts Hall of Fame running back Lenny Moore 's name is synonymous with Baltimore's football tradition. Now he could have his image immortalized. A $750,000 fund-raising drive in conjunction with the Ed Block Courage Award Foundation was announced Monday to create a statue to honor Moore. "We know without a doubt that Lenny not only has excelled in the area of football," said Marvin "Doc" Cheatham, the founder of the Lenny Moore Statue and Wax Figurine Committee, "but has also significantly contributed to many, many organizations.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
A cadre of spiritual giants was inducted Saturday into the National Great Blacks in Wax Museum as the East Baltimore gallery looks to expand in its third decade. About 1,000 people gathered in Morgan State University's Murphy Fine Arts Center for a tribute ceremony honoring three pastors and a gospel singer for their roles inspiring the country through faith. "Thank God for blessing them so that they could bless others," Rep. Elijah Cummings told the audience. "I want to thank our honorees for changing the trajectory of so many people's destiny.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1996
Retired Army Gen. Colin L. Powell, former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has been immortalized in East Baltimore.The Great Blacks in Wax Museum, the nation's first African-American wax museum, unveiled yesterday a life-sized likeness of the four-star general during a ceremony attended by Powell, his wife, Alma, and other dignitaries, including Maryland's U.S. Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, U.S. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings and Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke."
NEWS
By SHERRY GRAHAM | March 7, 1995
Cal Ripken Jr. was there. So were Kristi Yamaguchi, Mickey Mantle and Michael Jordan. Even Babe Ruth swung a bat or two.I saw these famous people and many others at the "wax museum" recently at Freedom Elementary School.During February, Freedom third-graders studied biographies, reading about famous people in sports, politics, science, music, art, literature and medicine.After researching the life of a famous person and writing a report to show what they had learned, the students became the historical figures during the wax museum event.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2001
Elmer P. Martin, president and co-founder of the Great Blacks in Wax Museum in East Baltimore, died last week while traveling in Egypt. Councilwoman Helen L. Holton, a Northwest Baltimore Democrat and a member of the museum's board of trustees, confirmed last night that Martin, 54, died Thursday while traveling with his wife, Joanne M. Martin, the museum's executive director. Holton said she did not know the cause of death. "It is a great loss to this community," Holton said. Holton, who announced Martin's death at last night's City Council meeting, said Martin is "someone who will truly be missed for his contributions to the African-American community."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2001
Dr. Elmer P. Martin, co-founder and president of the Great Blacks in Wax Museum Inc., died Thursday of an apparent heart attack while on a Nile River boat trip in Egypt. He was 54 and lived in Randallstown. Recalled as an educational visionary who wanted to bring both little- and well-known incidents of black history to life, he founded the museum with $30,000 he had saved to buy a home. The museum opened in 1983 in a storefront on West Saratoga Street. Today, the museum is in several rowhouses and a former fire station in the 1600 block of E. North Ave. and attracts about 275,000 visitors annually.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | September 6, 1994
Elmer and Joanne Martin began their mission to keep black history alive by carting around four wax figures in their car. Thirteen years later, 117 figures line two floors of their Great Blacks in Wax Museum in a converted East Baltimore firehouse.While their collection of wax figures has grown, one thing hasn't changed."We live right on the financial edge," Mrs. Martin laments. "An institution can't survive on that level. We can't live in the survival mode and be around 10 years from now."
SPORTS
By Zach Helfand and The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
Carmelo Anthony stood completely motionless for minutes on end on Tuesday while others circled around and looked on. Madame Tussauds wax museum called it a prank.   New York Knicks fans just call it, “running the offense.”   Seriously, though, this was a nice show of community outreach from Melo, during which he surprised museum visitors thinking the real Anthony was a wax sculpture . The look of shock and surprise and delight on the faces of the startled fans said it all.   But if Madame Tussauds really wanted to shock and surprise and delight people, they didn't even need the real Anthony.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
Where the passengers on the tour bus rolling west on North Avenue saw blocks of crumbling and abandoned buildings and overgrown lots, Lou Fields envisioned another Pratt Street in the making. Fields, who heads a nonprofit heritage tourism group, is leading an effort to revitalize what he views as one of the city's most overlooked thoroughfares. Progress is possible, he says, even in tough economic times. "Attention, awareness and appreciation — if you don't have those things going on, nothing's going to happen," said Fields, who views his role as that of "visionary crusader.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2011
Retired basketball star Chris Webber will help the National Great Blacks in Wax Museum raise funds for a $75 million replacement facility scheduled to open on Baltimore's North Avenue corridor in 2015. The museum announced that Webber, a five-time National Basketball Association All-Star who played from 1993 to 2008, will help launch an initiative next week to raise $4 million for the sports wing of a $7 million gallery of sports, recreation and athletics that will be part of the new museum.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
On stage, Maddie Poole's attitude is fierce, stomping around in high heels, a leopard print dress and heavy makeup, and speaking with a commanding voice that carries across the auditorium. But backstage, still in makeup but wearing a hooded sweat shirt and no longer in the heels, her posture has eased, her voice is softer and she's dropped the scowl for a smile. "My character is awful. She's an awful person," the 14-year-old said during a recent rehearsal at the Children's Theatre of Annapolis.
TRAVEL
By Nancy Jones Bonbrest, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
What better way to celebrate Presidents Day weekend than getting up close and personal with all 43 presidents — well, their lifelike wax figures, that is. The Presidents Gallery at Madame Tussauds Washington opens this week with an unveiling of the museum's new $2 million exhibit featuring wax figures of the U.S. leaders, from No. 1, George Washington, to No. 44, Barack Obama. (Grover Cleveland, for those counting, was No. 22 and No. 24.) "This is the only place in the world where you are able to stand next to them, put your arms around them and interact with all 44 presidents in three-dimensional fashion," said Dan Rogoski, general manager of Madame Tussauds Washington.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2011
Some students at Bates Middle School dream of stopping global warming, others of living in expensive houses, and others of being honor roll students. Sheryl Menendez tells them to dream big but reminds them that no dream is too small or too trivial, and then she works with them to make their dreams realities. Menendez is executive director of the Annapolis-based, nonprofit Restoration Community Development Corp., which founded the Gems and Jewels Mentoring Program for Bates students in 1998 and later for Annapolis Middle School.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2000
With a bit of prodding from his wife Blanche, Mark Powell will tell you about the Great Baltimore Fire of 1904. Not what he's read about it; what he remembers. "My father took me down to Baltimore and Hanover streets to watch the fire," Powell said. "It was a Sunday afternoon. My mother stayed home to pack so we could go to Pennsylvania, because we were afraid the whole city might burn down." Powell was 6 years old at the time. Next week he'll turn 102. Yesterday, he was honored as one of Baltimore's Living Legends in a ceremony at the Great Blacks in Wax Museum.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2010
Benjamin Franklin arrived with a kite outlined in lights. At the flip of a switch, the lights went on and the character listed his many accomplishments. Adolphe Sax, dressed in formal attire, spoke of his career in music. Amelia Earhart expounded on her flying technique, and Ginger Rogers offered details from her life in film. They were, in reality, fifth-graders who each took on a different persona for the annual wax museum at Cromwell Valley Elementary in Towson. Costumed and accessorized historical, literary, sports and entertainment characters filled the school cafeteria and gym Wednesday.
NEWS
January 26, 2010
Charges were dropped Friday against Jonathan Miller, who had been accused of participating in a deadly stabbing last month after a party at the Great Blacks in Wax Museum. "This kid was a victim. ... He didn't stab anyone," said Miller's defense attorney, Jack B. Rubin. Miller, 18, admitted to police that he was involved in a group fight at the Baltimore museum during which Joshua Hargrove, 20, was stabbed and killed. But Miller wasn't armed, his attorney said, and the teenager had also been stabbed that night.
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