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NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2005
The Ehrlich administration is proposing new water-quality standards that would allow the state to classify some Maryland waterways as too polluted to justify the expense of cleaning them up. Officials at the Maryland Department of the Environment say their proposed revision of regulations required by the Clean Water Act is an attempt to strike a balance between environmental goals and the needs of business. "We're not giving up on our waters; we are just trying to be practical," said Richard Eskin, who is the head of regulatory services for the department.
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NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2005
The Ehrlich administration, under fire from critics who say it is trying to weaken water quality standards, backed away yesterday from a proposal to classify some waterways as too polluted to justify the expense of cleanup. The reversal came as a national environmental group, American Rivers, called the largest source of fresh water into the bay, the Susquehanna River, the "most endangered" in America, in part because of sewage treatment issues. The Chesapeake Bay Foundation used the occasion to hold a news conference beside the river and criticize the Ehrlich administration for trying to weaken standards for the Susquehanna, Baltimore Harbor and waterways statewide.
NEWS
August 14, 2003
RESIDENTS OF SHORELINE communities in northern Anne Arundel County have something rare and precious they're trying to protect: clean water. Stuff you can still swim and fish in -- and even see through to the bottom of shallow creeks. At a time when so many other Chesapeake Bay tributaries and the bay itself have been badly damaged by pollution from overbuilt suburbs and overfertilized fields, people in Pasadena know better than to take their healthy waterways for granted. Thus, they have been complaining since last fall that Main, Back and Bodkin creeks are cloudy brown from dirt washing off hundreds of acres of bare land exposed during construction of Compass Pointe Golf Course.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2003
Anne Arundel County officials have accused the Maryland Economic Development Corp. of failing to properly address storm water management at the 36-hole public golf course being built by the independent state agency in Pasadena. County officials issued a stop-work order at Compass Pointe Golf Course at noon yesterday after complaints, including some from local residents, about runoff because of downed silt fences and failure of other devices intended to keep sediment from washing into waterways.
NEWS
May 18, 2006
Peering down at the creek running northwest of Cromwell Park Drive in Anne Arundel County, you can glimpse what appears to be a lovely bit of nature that somehow escaped the industrial park dreariness that surrounds it. The sleepy little stream meanders beneath a lush canopy of trees, its waters animated by 11 species of fish and accompanied by the chirp of migrating birds. In fact, this pastoral vista is mostly man-made, part of a $20 million restoration project to repair damage to the Sawmill Creek watershed caused largely by stormwater running off the Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | January 9, 1998
An environmentalists' lawsuit will likely force Maryland and the Environmental Protection Agency to take a closer look at pollution levels in more than 120 stretches of state rivers and streams.Whether the case will result in real cleanup is unclear, members of the Chesapeake Bay Commission were told yesterday at their meeting in Annapolis. But the suit could increase pressure on the state to get tough with industrial polluters and runoff, according to experts at the EPA's Chesapeake Bay Program, the main federal program coordinating bay preservation.
NEWS
May 22, 2005
THE QUESTION: COLUMBIA HAS SNOWDEN RIVER PARKWAY. WHERE IS SNOWDEN RIVER? The river hasn't moved, but historical research suggests the names of the waterways have, along with the people who live near them. According to research done by Robin Emrich of the Columbia Archives, the Snowden family was a large, wealthy clan of tobacco growers who farmed both sides of what is now called the Little Patuxent River in the early 1720s. At the time, according to records of several court cases she found in the online archives of the Maryland Historical Society, there was a waterway called "Snowden's River," and, although the references are a bit vague, it is likely now called the Little Patuxent River, which flows through Columbia.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2003
Special agent Ralph Plummer remembers the day he was patrolling Aberdeen Proving Ground's shoreline and found a family enjoying a campfire on the beach, yards from a 155 mm ammunition round, barely hidden in the sand. Nearby, a sign plainly said that the beach was a site of unexploded ordnance, which the military commonly calls UXO. The family's boat, Plummer said, was tied to the sign pole. "The Bush and Gunpowder rivers are one of the most active recreational boating areas in the bay," said Plummer, who has worked for APG's Marine, Wildlife and Environmental Law Enforcement Division for 21 years.
NEWS
May 26, 2003
Frank White, 69, who became governor of Arkansas by defeating Bill Clinton in an election in 1980, died Wednesday at his home in Little Rock. No cause was released. Mr. White, a Republican, took office after Mr. Clinton had served one term as the state's chief executive. Mr. Clinton came back to defeat Mr. White in 1982 and served as Arkansas governor until he was elected president a decade later. As governor, Mr. White was known as the signer of a measure approved by the Legislature requiring Arkansas teachers to include "creation science" in the curriculum if the theory of evolution was also taught.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2002
Baltimore residents tend to care more than others about the Chesapeake Bay, but recycle household trash less than any other community in the bay's six-state watershed, according to an environmental survey released yesterday. The survey, prepared for the Environmental Protection Agency's Chesapeake Bay Program office, shows that nearly half of the watershed's 16 million residents do not understand that their daily actions have a direct impact on water quality locally and in the bay. The 64,000-square-mile watershed area includes Maryland, Virginia, Washington, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, New York and Delaware.
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