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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
The South River Federation set its inaugural Swimmable Action Day to start at 11 a.m. Sunday with a dash into the water off Mayo Beach Park. But the beach's soft-flowing waves beckoned enthusiasts all morning, and young and old answered the call by canoeing, kayaking and swimming - so much so that they had to emerge from the water to stage the group dash on cue. Riverkeeper Diana Muller hopes it stays that way. She and others at the Edgewater-based federation...
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SPORTS
By Jonathan Munshaw, The Baltimore Sun and By Jonathan Munshaw, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
Liz Sweeney of Timonium used to race her kayak while living in New York City. At the time, Sweeney would practice in the Hudson River, though public access to waterways was hard to find. Now, she is able to get up early and take her kayak to Loch Raven Fishing Center in Baltimore County, as she did on a recent day. Although she no longer races, she still uses her kayak for exercise. Elsewhere at the fishing center that day, minutes after Sweeney got out of the water, Rick Warner of Carney came in on his fishing boat following a morning excursion.
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FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | July 31, 2004
AN OLD publication once called Baltimore the Liverpool of America, a reference to our harbor, shipping and industry. There are times, however, when I prefer to compare our city to Venice, because of all the water underfoot. I'm serious. This summer, we've seen an apparently sound chunk of Cathedral Street collapse. Another urban sink hole, suspiciously close to the Walters Art Museum. Some 35 years ago, when construction crews labored and labored to build its back addition (at the time, I thought the pyramids went up faster)
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
Boozy boaters, beware. The Maryland Natural Resources Police spent the weekend patrolling the state's most-trafficked waterways for drunken boaters in a nationwide policing event, "Operation Dry Water," as they prepare for the throngs that will be out over the coming Fourth of July weekend. Patrols from the Coast Guard and local agencies joined in the effort, which has been held among police forces nationwide each summer since 2009, Natural Resources Police spokeswoman Candy Thomson said.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | September 20, 1996
A $10.1 million dredging contract has been awarded to California-based Dutra Construction Co. Inc. by the Baltimore District of the Army Corps of Engineers.The company will dredge several waterways, including the Craighill, Brewerton and Tolchester channels.Pub Date: 9/20/96
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 7, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration is on the verge of exempting more than one-third of the nation's waterways from federal rules that protect them from pollution, according to environmental and business activists. Isolated wetlands and smaller streams that occasionally go dry would no longer get protection under the 30-year-old Clean Water Act because the administration is planning to change the definition of protected waterways, many activists say. The Environmental Protection Agency would not comment.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Sun Staff Correspondent | April 21, 1994
BLADENSBURG -- Against the backdrop of an abandoned Maryland marina silted over as the result of urban development, the chief federal environmental official said yesterday that 40 percent of the nation's rivers, lakes and streams are adversely affected by pollution.Carol M. Browner, head of the Environmental Protection Agency, cited the Anacostia River waterfront, just outside Washington in this historic Prince George's County community, as an example of what "silt from polluted runoff -- the No. 1 problem threatening America's waterways" -- can produce.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | September 1, 1999
Saying the future of maritime businesses and recreational boating is at stake, Baltimore County will press ahead with its request to dredge four Middle River waterways, even though the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is likely to deny the request.County officials are concerned that vessels -- particularly sailboats -- can't make it into the channels and are seeking permits to dredge Greyhound Cove, Chestnut Cove, Frog Mortar Creek and Galloway Creek. More than 300 homes and 20 marinas, restaurants and other water-dependent businesses are on those waterways.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1999
Five picturesque creeks and coves in eastern Baltimore County are being dredged and another four will be scooped in an aggressive $2 million project to enrich the environment and continue to attract recreational boaters.The deepening of the channels is considered crucial to the environment because the process allows sunlight to reach the submerged grasses that serve as natural banquets for fish and crabs. Also, the ebb and flow of tides, or flushing, is vastly improved because of easier passage of water from the creeks into Middle River.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2000
Baltimore will spend $475,000 to study its aging sewer system, which has caused more than 16 million gallons of raw sewage to be dumped into waterways over the past five months. With legal pressure building from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Maryland Department of the Environment, the city Board of Estimates unanimously agreed yesterday to an emergency spending request to hire engineers to examine ways to upgrade and maintain the system. The board approved a contract with Metcalf and Eddy Services of Baltimore to inspect and determine priorities for repairs to the 3,100-mile system.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
Jeff Lill is a popular man lately, as captain of the J.C. Widener, one of the state's few ice breakers. After leaving its Annapolis harbor at 8:30 Wednesday morning, the Widener spent the day criss-crossing the waters off Anne Arundel County - beckoned for help from the creeks of the Severn River to government research buoys in the Chesapeake Bay. It cleared paths for a sea trial from an Annapolis marina, a waterman in search of rockfish on the...
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
The South River Federation set its inaugural Swimmable Action Day to start at 11 a.m. Sunday with a dash into the water off Mayo Beach Park. But the beach's soft-flowing waves beckoned enthusiasts all morning, and young and old answered the call by canoeing, kayaking and swimming - so much so that they had to emerge from the water to stage the group dash on cue. Riverkeeper Diana Muller hopes it stays that way. She and others at the Edgewater-based federation...
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | June 18, 2013
Editor: We received a letter from Danielle Spendiff at the Maryland Department of Environment regarding a public information hearing. The hearing will be held on Wednesday, June 26, at the Abingdon Fire Hall, Station 1, 3306 Abingdon Rd. The hearing is about an application submitted by the Maryland Transportation Authority (MdTA) regarding the granting of a Nontidal Wetland and Waterways Permit connected to the I-95 Section 200 plan.  According to the letter, "the public information hearing allows the applicant and interested persons the opportunity to present facts and make statements for, or against, the granting of" the permit(s)
NEWS
May 6, 2013
Thanks to Alison Prost for her recent commentary ("Beyond 'rain tax' rhetoric," May 1) explaining the health and economic issues that will be addressed with a stormwater fee and debunking the misrepresentation of the fee. The fee is not about rain. It takes aim at the pollution, trash and debris that are washing into our local rivers, the Baltimore Harbor and Chesapeake Bay. The polluted runoff makes these waterways unfit for use and the fish in them unsafe to eat. Many Baltimore organizations - private, public, community and nonprofit - are working hard to make our waterways fishable and swimmable.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2013
Captains Sharing & Caring, a nonprofit foundation that gives children with terminal illnesses or physical disabilities and their families a day out on several local waterways, is looking to marinas, yacht clubs and those with private docks to hosts events this summer. According to Cheryl Krajcsik, the executive director of the foundation, this is the third summer that the foundation will run events, mostly on Middle, North East and Magothy rivers and Bodkin Creek. The events typically last from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. on the water - with a picnic or other activities, such as swimming afterward - on Sundays from June through August.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
On good days, the Tiber Hudson tributary of the Patapsco is a pleasant part of the scenery in Historic Ellicott City as it flows through a stone channel by Tonge Row, beneath Tiber Alley alongside Main Street and past the B&O Railroad Museum before it spills into the river. It's a troubled waterway nonetheless, not considered able to support life, paved over in spots and surrounded by lots of asphalt. The urban and suburban surroundings that drain into the Tiber Hudson - its "watershed" - will be inspected early in December by teams of consultants and volunteers as part of a continuing private, county and state effort to improve the streams and rivers that ultimately flow into the Chesapeake Bay. Focusing on areas some distance from its channel, the crew of about 15 will spend four days driving around, looking for possible pollution sources and ways to better protect the Tiber Hudson.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | December 27, 2001
Captivated by the idea of living and playing on the water, Evan Belaga moved two years ago from the sprawl of Tysons Corner, Va., to a fixer-upper on the banks of Weems Creek in Annapolis. But his vision of life on the waterfront began to blur once he took a closer look at the creek behind his home. With each rain, a torrent of sediment, debris and oil gushed into the creek, creating a murky mess. "It's like the Mississippi Delta," Belaga said. Once he became aware of the problem, the newcomer didn't waste time before acting.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | May 27, 2006
Among the many rites of summer that are being renewed this holiday weekend, police across Maryland plan increased patrols in an effort to clamp down on drunken driving and boating. "Most folks will be off on holiday, but we are working," said Sgt. Thornnie O. Rouse, spokesman for the Maryland State Police. "People often tell us that they are paying our salaries. We are just showing them they are getting their money's worth." Stepping up patrols on Maryland waterways, the state Department of Natural Resources has canceled leave for its 280-member police force who are involved in "Operation Osprey" this weekend.
NEWS
May 31, 2012
On the wave of unwanted publicity over unruly youths downtown, owners of businesses around the Inner Harbor were probably none too thrilled to have the smell of dead fish wafting through the air last weekend. Naturally, they brushed it off as having no impact on tourism - but you can bet that the odor was about as welcome as another Pat McDonough press conference. The likely culprit was mahogany tide, an algae that feeds on excess nutrients. This creates huge blooms that eventually die, rot and suck the oxygen out of the water, leaving other forms of aquatic life to suffocate.
NEWS
By Robert M. Summers | May 14, 2012
Maryland is fortunate to have many beautiful parks, rivers and streams, breathtaking views, delicious fish and shellfish and enjoyable recreational opportunities, from our nation's largest estuary to the snow-capped mountains in Western Maryland. Throughout our history, we have not done enough to protect these treasures and the water that links them, allowing them to deteriorate and their ecosystems to suffer. Under Gov.Martin O'Malley's leadership, though, things have started to turn around.
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