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NEWS
February 27, 2003
IN ELDERSBURG this week, the Carroll County commissioners held a ceremony at which they reaffirmed the county's intent to better control rampaging development in its share of the watershed of Baltimore's Liberty Reservoir. A bit of pomp was certainly in order, for that re-signing - loudly resisted by two sets of county commissioners for seven years - was itself a watershed, so to speak, in this region's often losing fight against sprawl. It also was very much a credit to Julia Walsh Gouge, who's served as a county commissioner off and on since 1986 and who in recent years has been a lonely voice on that body for controlling Carroll's growth.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2014
Dr. Michael Beer, former chairman of the department of biophysics at the Johns Hopkins University who was an environmentalist who worked diligently to clean up and protect Stony Run and the Jones Falls, died Aug. 22. He was 88. Dr. Beer was dining with his companion, Patricia Laidlaw, at her Roland Park home when he was stricken with a heart attack. He was taken to Union Memorial, where he was pronounced dead, said his daughter, Suzanne C. Beer of Middle River. "In the early days of molecular microscopy he was one of the key figures," said Dr. Bertrand Garcia-Moreno, chairman of the department of biophysics at the Johns Hopkins University.
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NEWS
January 20, 2010
The Chesapeake Bay Commission says a new report outlines the Chesapeake Bay watershed's biofuel potential. The report, scheduled to be released today by the commission and the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, will detail the findings and recommendations of the Chesapeake Biofuels Advisory Panel. The report is the third and last in a series by the commission. The commission says the emerging biofuels industry has the potential to provide thousands of jobs over the next 12 years and significant amounts of fuel while helping to achieve bay restoration goals.
NEWS
Staff Reports, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Howard County's Watershed Protection and Restoration Program is launching a project to repair a stormwater pond on Old Mill Road in the vicinity of Millwick Drive in Ellicott City. The project will include replacement of the pond's metal principal spillway with a new concrete spillway. Last year, the County Council approved a Watershed Protection and Restoration Plan that is expected to collect $9.5 million annually for improvement projects. The money will be used for stream restorations, pond retrofits, bioretention areas, asphalt reduction and other projects to meet a federally required target of making sure that 20 percent of the county's untreated impervious surface is being treated by 2019.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
After 25 years working often literally in Maryland's trenches trying to help restore waterways that feed into the Chesapeake Bay, 53-year-old John L. McCoy came back to Columbia for a very special job. "I've come home," said the beefy, crew-cut and mustached new Columbia Association watershed manager. Five years short of a full state pension, McCoy, of Clarksville, resigned his Department of Natural Resources job to return to Columbia, where he had worked part-time for CA as a college student.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2011
A pair of Chesapeake Bay Foundation employees left Annapolis Saturday morning on a 1,300-mile journey through the six states in the bay's watershed — by bicycle. John Rodenhausen and Beth McGee will attempt to ride through the 64,000-square-mile watershed, which stretches to Cooperstown, N.Y., and as far west as the Shenandoah Valley, to raise money for the Bay Foundation. They will spend their first night in southern Pennsylvania, pedal to New York and circle back through western Pennsylvania, then to Virginia and return via the Eastern Shore over the next three weeks.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON | November 19, 1994
You'd think fish, of all creatures, would be smart enough to go with the flow.I was telling a group of fifth-graders about the amazing migrations of spawning herring and shad, how they used to climb the tributary rivers of the Chesapeake Bay, bucking the spring runoff for hundreds of miles, thrashing all the way from the ocean to upstate New York and the foothills of Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains.The kids were intrigued, and glad to learn that Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania are breaching and bypassing dozens of dams in hopes of restoring the historic runs.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1996
Officials from Howard, Montgomery and Prince George's counties signed an agreement yesterday to protect the water supply of the Upper Patuxent watershed, which lies in the three counties.Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker, Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan and Prince George's County Executive Wayne K. Curry agreed to maintain the water quality of the Triadelphia and T. Howard Duckett reservoirs -- an area of 85,000 acres that overlaps into the three counties -- for the estimated 700,000 residents who get their drinking water from the watershed.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1998
The county will apply for additional state funding to continue preservation efforts in the Little Pipe Creek watershed, a 35,000-acre area on Carroll's western edge.The county commissioners approved yesterday a request by Philip J. Rovang, county planning director, to draft an application seeking funding through the state's Rural Legacy program. County officials have not determined how much Carroll would seek.The $29 million program, part of Gov. Parris N. Glendening's Smart Growth initiative, was created to protect land that might not qualify for other preservation programs.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | November 18, 1994
Anne Arundel County should manage the 78-square mile Severn River watershed as one unit, rather than continue to allow piecemeal development, and repair environmental damage caused by older communities, a draft study for the Severn River Commission says.In addition, new communities in the watershed should be squeezed into clusters, leaving other areas pristine, while communities built before storm water control laws were enacted should be required to fix their drainage systems, the study says.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Washington College's 12-11 decision over 2013 national champion Stevenson in an NCAA tournament quarterfinal at Mustang Stadium in Owings Mills on Wednesday night could be the turning point for a program that has been dormant for almost a decade. The Shoremen (18-1) will meet top-seeded Salisbury (20-1) on Sunday in the program's first national semifinal since 2004, and the significance of Wednesday's win over the Mustangs (19-3) was not lost on senior attackman Jim Cusick. “It's huge,” said the Calvert Hall graduate, who paced Washington College with six points on five goals and one assist.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | March 4, 2014
Dull though the subject matter may be, it would be hard to overstate the potential impact on Harford County of a consolidated, countywide water and sewer system. Running a municipal water system that meets the demands of large swaths of the populace, and then dealing with the wastewater that goes down the drain, are among the least flashy aspects of government. As a result, unless there's a problem - like the recent one in West Virginia - resulting in large numbers of people being without clean water, or instances where raw sewage fouls a public waterway, municipal water and sewer issues are not the stuff of commonplace political conversation.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | January 30, 2014
Environmentalists are slamming a new draft Chesapeake Bay restoration agreement for failing to address toxic pollution or even mention climate change as a complicating factor in the three-decade effort to revive the ailing estuary. The Chesapeake Bay Program , a "partnership" of the Environmental Protection Agency and the six states that drain into the bay - including Maryland - released Wednesday a draft agreement "to guide the next chapter of restoration across the watershed.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2014
It all comes down to slowing the flow. By training residents to be savvy environmental leaders who can inspire their neighbors to take action, a nonprofit organization hopes to reduce the flow of polluted stormwater runoff that eventually empties into the Chesapeake Bay. The Howard County Watershed Stewards Academy - which just graduated its first class two months ago - is recruiting for a second class of volunteers interested in learning how...
NEWS
By Tom Horton | September 3, 2013
What if they held an environmental crisis and no one cared? What if a law moving through Congress would significantly harm clean water, open space, the Chesapeake Bay? You'd hear the alarms, strong and clear, from the largest national groups to the smallest Chesapeake organizations. But you won't in this case, because this law is "only" about population - about significantly increasing the number of people who will be living in the United States and around the Chesapeake. The law, which has passed the U.S. Senate and gone to the House with broad, bipartisan backing, is a comprehensive reform of our outdated immigration laws.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2013
Elspeth Anne Banker Wheeler, a retired Baltimore City elementary school teacher, gardener and environmental advocate, died of lung cancer July 21 at her Roland Park home. She was 84. Born Elspeth Anne Banker in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Paul J. Banker, a Sun and Evening Sun editor, and Alfretta Wilcox Banker, a music teacher and singer who had studied with tenor Enrico Caruso. She was a 1947 Eastern High School graduate and earned a bachelor's degree at Goucher College.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2001
The states of the Chesapeake Bay watershed won't meet their land preservation goals without new programs and reliable sources of money, according to a report being released today in Maryland. The report from the Trust for Public Lands and the Chesapeake Bay Commission estimates that the states will have to spend about $1.8 billion over the next 10 years to meet the goals spelled out in the latest version of the bay cleanup pact. In Chesapeake 2000, the update of the 1983 Chesapeake Bay Agreement, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and the District of Columbia pledged to "permanently preserve" 20 percent of the land in the watershed by 2010, about 1.4 million acres.
NEWS
By Tom Horton | June 24, 2013
Don't mess with Mother Nature, they say; but we do, perhaps must - hard-wired like steroidal beavers to be forever engineering our environment. Some of our most emphatic "messing" is to pave and roof over the soft, vibrant skin of green earth. This obviously deadens it for the rest of life. Less obviously, by disrupting the natural flow of rain, it disrupts all manner of complex and vital communication between watersheds and waters. We lump all this under "stormwater pollution," oversimplifying the problem, ensuring that we take too narrow an approach to solutions.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 31, 2013
With the weekend upon us, there are events happening in the city aimed at enlisting residents in improving their neighborhoods while also cleaning up Baltimore harbor. Oh, and participants will be getting a little fresh-air exercise in the process. There's a block-by-block trash cleanup Saturday in East Baltimore from 1-3 p.m., starting at the corner of Patterson Park and Eastern Ave., ending at the square in Fells Point. Held in conjunction with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's 25th annual "Clean the Bay Day," it's organized by a Patterson Park activist.  For more, check out " Baltimore Trash Talk " on Facebook.
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