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NEWS
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,Staff writer | May 10, 1992
Watermark Place, Columbia's only high-rise luxury condominium, is on the receiving end of an attempted resuscitation, taking on new owners, a new look and lower prices.The 12-story property overlooking Wilde Lake was turned over to NationsBank of Maryland in January after a year in which the real estate market took a nose dive and attempts to sell units atWatermark floundered badly.Now the project has reopened, boasting a face lift and new management that has dropped prices of Watermark's 76 units, some of which once sold for as much as $600,000 with all the amenities.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
Annapolis is a town rich in history, and its reputed ghosts are certainly part of the state capital's lore. There's the spirit of Reverdy Johnson, a politician and lawyer who died at the governor's mansion in 1876; and plasterer Thomas Dance, who plummeted to his death while working on the State House dome in 1793. And there is the capital city's most famous soul: John Paul Jones, father of the U.S. Navy, entombed at the Naval Academy's chapel. The ghost of Jones, who died in Paris and whose body was later moved to Annapolis, is rumored to still whisper: "Where am I?"
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,Evening Sun Staff | January 22, 1991
Despite the soft waters of an economic recession, Watermark Place has waded in with the newest and most expensive of suburban Baltimore condominiums.The development rises near the Columbia Mall like a post-modern castle above a canopy of trees. With 12 stories awash in trendy beige and mauve, Watermark is a hard-to-miss oddity among Columbia's tradition of three-bedroom colonials, townhouses and garden apartments.For many, it is a sign that Columbia has come of age, offering a lifestyle and exclusivity once reserved for the well-heeled urban dweller.
HEALTH
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
Jim Southward, captain of the Harbor Queen, warned his passengers politely and then sounded one long and three short blasts of his very loud horn. "Draw up the gangplank. Cast off," he called to the crew. Yoga classes don't usually start this way. This was yoga on a boat. A very large boat. The double-decker Harbor Queen, celebrating its 41st birthday this year, makes several 40-minute circuits of the Annapolis harbor each day in the summer. But it is usually filled with tourists or schoolchildren on a field trip.
NEWS
July 12, 2006
Lighthouse cruise -- Watermark Cruises will hold "Bay Lighthouse Cruises" from 12:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Sunday and July 23 and 30 from Annapolis City Dock to the Thomas Point Shoal lighthouse (shown), as well as the Sandy Point Shoal and Baltimore Harbor lighthouses, with live narration. The cost is $35 for adults, $17 for children under 12 years. Call for reservations. 410-268-7601, ext. 100.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2003
A Baltimore counterfeiter whose intricate, hand-drawn watermarks earned him the nickname "the Artist" told a federal judge yesterday that he made the fake bills to feed a gambling addiction and said he got the idea after watching a program on The Learning Channel about government efforts to thwart counterfeiting. Charles Philip Defoe, who authorities said produced as much as $120,000 in fake money during a two-year period, said in U.S. District Court yesterday that he started making the money in late 1999 after draining his savings buying lottery tickets and playing slot machines in Atlantic City and Delaware.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
Annapolis is a town rich in history, and its reputed ghosts are certainly part of the state capital's lore. There's the spirit of Reverdy Johnson, a politician and lawyer who died at the governor's mansion in 1876; and plasterer Thomas Dance, who plummeted to his death while working on the State House dome in 1793. And there is the capital city's most famous soul: John Paul Jones, father of the U.S. Navy, entombed at the Naval Academy's chapel. The ghost of Jones, who died in Paris and whose body was later moved to Annapolis, is rumored to still whisper: "Where am I?"
BUSINESS
May 31, 1993
Add a touch of class to printed documentsToday's word processors let you print documents in almost jTC any way imaginable. So just when you think you've seen it all, something new appears. Watermarks.Well, actually it's simulated watermarking. Atmospheres is a collection of images that can be superimposed over an entire page or any part of a page. The images can add style, even a touch of class, to your everyday printed documents.A clever utility program appropriately named "Watermark" makes all work.
HEALTH
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
Jim Southward, captain of the Harbor Queen, warned his passengers politely and then sounded one long and three short blasts of his very loud horn. "Draw up the gangplank. Cast off," he called to the crew. Yoga classes don't usually start this way. This was yoga on a boat. A very large boat. The double-decker Harbor Queen, celebrating its 41st birthday this year, makes several 40-minute circuits of the Annapolis harbor each day in the summer. But it is usually filled with tourists or schoolchildren on a field trip.
NEWS
By Marcia Cephus | August 26, 2007
The Coast Guard, Sector Baltimore, has awarded Annapolis-based Watermark Cruises its Officer in Charge of Marine Inspections Award to honor the company's safety record over the five-year inspection cycle on the Annapolitan II. The award is given to recognize those whose vessels can go five years without any deficiencies. Watermark operates 11 inspected passenger vessels. Golf tourney raises $23,000 for MDA The Muscular Dystrophy Association raised nearly $23,000 for Jerry's Kids during the 19th annual Muscular Dystrophy Association, Sleep Inn and Comfort Inn Open golf tournament.
NEWS
By Marcia Cephus | August 26, 2007
The Coast Guard, Sector Baltimore, has awarded Annapolis-based Watermark Cruises its Officer in Charge of Marine Inspections Award to honor the company's safety record over the five-year inspection cycle on the Annapolitan II. The award is given to recognize those whose vessels can go five years without any deficiencies. Watermark operates 11 inspected passenger vessels. Golf tourney raises $23,000 for MDA The Muscular Dystrophy Association raised nearly $23,000 for Jerry's Kids during the 19th annual Muscular Dystrophy Association, Sleep Inn and Comfort Inn Open golf tournament.
NEWS
July 12, 2006
Lighthouse cruise -- Watermark Cruises will hold "Bay Lighthouse Cruises" from 12:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Sunday and July 23 and 30 from Annapolis City Dock to the Thomas Point Shoal lighthouse (shown), as well as the Sandy Point Shoal and Baltimore Harbor lighthouses, with live narration. The cost is $35 for adults, $17 for children under 12 years. Call for reservations. 410-268-7601, ext. 100.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2003
A Baltimore counterfeiter whose intricate, hand-drawn watermarks earned him the nickname "the Artist" told a federal judge yesterday that he made the fake bills to feed a gambling addiction and said he got the idea after watching a program on The Learning Channel about government efforts to thwart counterfeiting. Charles Philip Defoe, who authorities said produced as much as $120,000 in fake money during a two-year period, said in U.S. District Court yesterday that he started making the money in late 1999 after draining his savings buying lottery tickets and playing slot machines in Atlantic City and Delaware.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2003
As authorities followed the trail of counterfeit bills, from one fake $100 note at the Loews movie theater in White Marsh to another at a convenience store in Abingdon, their grudging respect for the intricate, hand-drawn watermarks on the homemade money earned its creator a nickname: "the artist." Charles Philip Defoe's talent for producing money was marked by that signature touch as well as by quantity, court records show. As he pleaded guilty to a counterfeiting charge yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, authorities said that over a two-year period Defoe made as much as $120,000 in fake bills that were cycled through the local economy.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1993
Add a touch of class to printed documentsToday's word processors let you print documents in almost jTC any way imaginable. So just when you think you've seen it all, something new appears. Watermarks.Well, actually it's simulated watermarking. Atmospheres is a collection of images that can be superimposed over an entire page or any part of a page. The images can add style, even a touch of class, to your everyday printed documents.A clever utility program appropriately named "Watermark" makes all work.
NEWS
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,Staff writer | May 10, 1992
Watermark Place, Columbia's only high-rise luxury condominium, is on the receiving end of an attempted resuscitation, taking on new owners, a new look and lower prices.The 12-story property overlooking Wilde Lake was turned over to NationsBank of Maryland in January after a year in which the real estate market took a nose dive and attempts to sell units atWatermark floundered badly.Now the project has reopened, boasting a face lift and new management that has dropped prices of Watermark's 76 units, some of which once sold for as much as $600,000 with all the amenities.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Eric Adams ANNE ARUNDEL COMMUNITY COLLEGE Pascal Center for Performing Arts. Faculty/student photographs | June 21, 1991
WATERMARK GALLERY100 S. Charles St. Edward C. Ramsburg, "Conversation with Paintings" and Kiki Jacobsen, "Dialogue with Figures."Featured among the more than 20 other artists on display at this co-op gallery (through July 2) are watercolors by Mr. Ramsburg and Ms. Jacobsen. The former's abstract paintings use a combination of earth tones and bold colors, while some others are dependant on line structure. Ms. Jacobsen's work includes mixed-media and collage along with paintings in bright, VTC primary colors; the forms suggest abstract representations of dancing women.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2003
As authorities followed the trail of counterfeit bills, from one fake $100 note at the Loews movie theater in White Marsh to another at a convenience store in Abingdon, their grudging respect for the intricate, hand-drawn watermarks on the homemade money earned its creator a nickname: "the artist." Charles Philip Defoe's talent for producing money was marked by that signature touch as well as by quantity, court records show. As he pleaded guilty to a counterfeiting charge yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, authorities said that over a two-year period Defoe made as much as $120,000 in fake bills that were cycled through the local economy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Eric Adams ANNE ARUNDEL COMMUNITY COLLEGE Pascal Center for Performing Arts. Faculty/student photographs | June 21, 1991
WATERMARK GALLERY100 S. Charles St. Edward C. Ramsburg, "Conversation with Paintings" and Kiki Jacobsen, "Dialogue with Figures."Featured among the more than 20 other artists on display at this co-op gallery (through July 2) are watercolors by Mr. Ramsburg and Ms. Jacobsen. The former's abstract paintings use a combination of earth tones and bold colors, while some others are dependant on line structure. Ms. Jacobsen's work includes mixed-media and collage along with paintings in bright, VTC primary colors; the forms suggest abstract representations of dancing women.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,Evening Sun Staff | January 22, 1991
Despite the soft waters of an economic recession, Watermark Place has waded in with the newest and most expensive of suburban Baltimore condominiums.The development rises near the Columbia Mall like a post-modern castle above a canopy of trees. With 12 stories awash in trendy beige and mauve, Watermark is a hard-to-miss oddity among Columbia's tradition of three-bedroom colonials, townhouses and garden apartments.For many, it is a sign that Columbia has come of age, offering a lifestyle and exclusivity once reserved for the well-heeled urban dweller.
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