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NEWS
February 19, 2013
Hardly a month goes by that The Sun does not further document how Chesapeake Bay pollution is eroding the livelihoods of our watermen. In a cynical moment, I once wrote in my book, "Bay Country," of a day when "we will memorialize the vanished watermen in a Colonial Williamsburg - Watermens' World, we'd call it ... tourists could view actors tonging Fiberglas oysters from the comfort of underwater viewing lounges.... " Now I'm encouraged to report that the Chesapeake Conservancy has an innovative program up and running that trains real life watermen to share their skills with tourists, supplementing their incomes while we work to restore the Chesapeake's seafood bounty.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Catherine Rentz, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
Lawrence "Daniel" Murphy, 37, of St. Michaels pleaded guilty Friday to illegally harvesting striped bass from the Chesapeake Bay. He served periodically as a helper on the Kristin Marie between 2007 and 2012 with Tilghman Island watermen Michael D. Hayden, Jr. and William J. Lednum. In early 2011, he, Hayden and Lednum attempted to harvest more than 20,000 pounds of striped bass using illegal, unattended and unmarked weighted gill nets fish around "Bloody Point" on the bay before the season was opened.
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NEWS
March 25, 2004
On Tuesday, March 23, 2004, FRANCES K. (nee Jones), beloved wife of the late Edward Waterman; devoted mother of E. Eugene Waterman; sister of Fred Jones and Edgar Jones. Friends may call at the LORING BYERS FUNERAL DIRECTORS INC., 8728 Liberty Rd (2 miles W. of Beltway Exit 18-B) Thursday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. Funeral Service Friday 11 A.M. at Augsburg Lutheran Home, 6811 Campfield Rd. Interment Druid Ridge Cemetery.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2013
Lawrence W. "Larry" Simns Sr., a fourth-generation waterman and longtime advocate for the Chesapeake Bay and those who make their living from its waters, died Thursday of bone cancer at his Rock Hall home. He was 75. "Larry stood sentry for the watermen of the Chesapeake Bay for over 40 years and courageously carried their banner into the 21st century," Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski said in a statement. "He fought to preserve their traditions and their opportunity to work on the water like their forefathers," she said.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | June 28, 2010
I've lived on the Chesapeake Bay for longer than I have lived anywhere else in my life, but I am not a sailor, nor a fisherman nor a waterman, so I have not made more use of its astonishing natural beauty than the occasional boat ride with friends or trips to the shore. It is a deficiency that deserves correcting in any case, but especially as we watch a kindred body of water down south destroyed by the worst oil drilling disaster of all time. So, when my friend Betsy invited a handful of women friends to meet the fisherman who has been her husband's best friend and fishing pal since elementary school and to see the Eastern Shore of Virginia through his eyes, and on his boat, it was easy to say yes. We traveled to Cape Charles in Northampton County, on the tip of Virginia's Eastern Shore, and unloaded our shorts, T-shirts, cameras, shell-collecting bags and wine at Sterling House, a bed & breakfast graciously restored by Steve Hairfield in a town full of such houses.
NEWS
March 5, 2006
ON March 3, 2006 LYMAN BYRNEWATERMAN SR, beloved husband of the late Helen S. Waterman, he is survived by children, Lyman B. Waterman Jr, and Robin K. Waterman, brother David Waterman of California, and sisters, Mary Miller of Tennessee and Jane Anderson of California. Visitation and funeral services will be announced at a later date. Services entrusted to STERLING-ASHTON-SCHWAB-WITZKE FUNERAL HOME OF CATONSVILLE, INC., 1630 Edmondson Avenue. 410-744-8600
NEWS
February 22, 2003
On Wednesday, February 19, 2003, at home, of Huntingdon, PA. Beloved wife of the late Russell Edwin Waterman; loving mother of Jeanne W. Smith of Plaistow, NH, Claire W. Barnes of Sykesville, MD and Elaine W. White of Westminster, MD; devoted sister of the late Mildred Morrison and William Wagner. Also, survived by six grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Mrs. Waterman was a member of 12th Street United Methodist Church, Huntingdon, PA and had been a member of Standing Stone Art League, Huntingdon County Arts Council and Huntingdon County Literacy CouncilMemorial Service will be Monday, February 24, 2003 at 2 PM in the 12th Street United Methodist Church in Huntingdon, PA where Pastor Wayne L. Richards will be performing the Eulogy.
NEWS
By Catherine Rentz, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
Lawrence "Daniel" Murphy, 37, of St. Michaels pleaded guilty Friday to illegally harvesting striped bass from the Chesapeake Bay. He served periodically as a helper on the Kristin Marie between 2007 and 2012 with Tilghman Island watermen Michael D. Hayden, Jr. and William J. Lednum. In early 2011, he, Hayden and Lednum attempted to harvest more than 20,000 pounds of striped bass using illegal, unattended and unmarked weighted gill nets fish around "Bloody Point" on the bay before the season was opened.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | February 11, 2007
Until this year, a Maryland Bass Federation member had never made it to the Bassmaster Classic, the sport's signature event. Japan and Zimbabwe have been represented, but not the 70-club federation. Guys came close, but close only counts in things like shaving and the sleeping arrangements in my tent. Now the streak is over, times two. Russ Colwell, a contractor and native of Dundalk, and Kevin Waterman, a plumber from La Plata, qualified for the 37th Classic, a three-day competition that begins Feb. 23 on Lay Lake in Birmingham, Ala. "It's a very difficult thing to do," Maryland federation president Roger Trageser said about securing one of the Classic spots.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | March 7, 2006
L. Byrne Waterman, a retired Chessie System railroad executive and maritime historian whose philanthropy and documentation of Chesapeake Bay-built whaling vessels earned him a national reputation, died of cancer Friday at St. Agnes Hospital. The longtime Catonsville resident was 85. Mr. Waterman was born in Elyria, Ohio, and was raised in Wheeling, W.Va. After graduating from high school in 1938, he was a junior bank bookkeeper, messenger and traveling steel company auditor. Drafted into the Army in 1942, he served as a radio operator with the 9th Armored Division in Europe and participated in the capture of the historic Ludendorff Bridge at Remagen from German forces on March 7, 1945.
NEWS
February 19, 2013
Hardly a month goes by that The Sun does not further document how Chesapeake Bay pollution is eroding the livelihoods of our watermen. In a cynical moment, I once wrote in my book, "Bay Country," of a day when "we will memorialize the vanished watermen in a Colonial Williamsburg - Watermens' World, we'd call it ... tourists could view actors tonging Fiberglas oysters from the comfort of underwater viewing lounges.... " Now I'm encouraged to report that the Chesapeake Conservancy has an innovative program up and running that trains real life watermen to share their skills with tourists, supplementing their incomes while we work to restore the Chesapeake's seafood bounty.
NEWS
By Tom Horton | May 21, 2012
It's 1943. First light colors the summer Chesapeake Bay off the fishing village of Rock Hall, revealing a 6-year-old boy rowing a wooden skiff, struggling to do it quietly, so not to scare the blue crabs his great-grandfather dips as they run their trotline. The crabs back then came up "thick as mosquitoes at dark," several at once attacking the eel baits tied along the trotline. As they work, the old man teaches the boy skills he'd need in the water business; he also speaks with sadness about how the state arbitrarily changed the fishing rules, ending his long career as a top bay captain.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | June 28, 2010
I've lived on the Chesapeake Bay for longer than I have lived anywhere else in my life, but I am not a sailor, nor a fisherman nor a waterman, so I have not made more use of its astonishing natural beauty than the occasional boat ride with friends or trips to the shore. It is a deficiency that deserves correcting in any case, but especially as we watch a kindred body of water down south destroyed by the worst oil drilling disaster of all time. So, when my friend Betsy invited a handful of women friends to meet the fisherman who has been her husband's best friend and fishing pal since elementary school and to see the Eastern Shore of Virginia through his eyes, and on his boat, it was easy to say yes. We traveled to Cape Charles in Northampton County, on the tip of Virginia's Eastern Shore, and unloaded our shorts, T-shirts, cameras, shell-collecting bags and wine at Sterling House, a bed & breakfast graciously restored by Steve Hairfield in a town full of such houses.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | April 29, 2009
A Leonardtown waterman was sentenced to 15 months in federal prison Tuesday and ordered to pay $240,000 in restitution for poaching nearly $1 million worth of striped bass. The Department of Justice said that commercial fisherman Thomas Crowder Jr. was part of a black market operation that involved more than a dozen defendants and tons of fish taken from the Chesapeake Bay and Potomac River over several years. But the attorney for Crowder said there was no criminal scheme, just a broken state measuring system and a failure to report inaccuracies that benefited his client.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | April 23, 2009
GREENBELT - A Virginia waterman was sentenced in U.S. District Court on Wednesday to one year and one day in prison, was fined $4,000 and was ordered to make $40,000 in restitution for his part in the largest striped bass poaching case in the history of the Chesapeake Bay. Meanwhile, the sting operation widened as federal prosecutors charged a St. Mary's County waterman and fish wholesaler and his business with falsifying catch records and illegally selling...
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | February 6, 2009
Virginia watermen used illegally submerged nets to fish out of season and altered and reused fish tags as part of the black market responsible for illegally catching millions of dollars worth of striped bass from the Chesapeake Bay and Potomac River, according to affidavits for federal search warrants. The court records, filed in U.S. District Court in Alexandria, Va., present a picture of a much larger operation, one in which one waterman boasted to undercover officers of making $600,000 in one year of poaching and hinted at making bribes.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | February 29, 2008
Nearly 100 watermen attended a meeting in Annapolis last night to hear state officials' proposals for restricting Maryland's blue crab harvest in hopes of protecting the increasingly struggling crustacean. The options on the table include bushel limits for crabs, restrictions on the soft-crab fishery and a maximum size limit on females. Lynn Fegley, the Department of Natural Resources' blue crab expert, said the department is hoping to have a draft proposal ready in two weeks and will introduce the regulations in mid-April.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | February 6, 2008
Anyone who plies the waters of the Chesapeake Bay for 33 years is bound to have some stories to tell. Fifth-generation Shady Side waterman Tommy Hallock has more than a few: the time he caught more croakers than his boat could handle. Or the times he netted a dead body, and a shark. One of his favorites is sinking his boat at age 15, and nobody believing his pleas for help because it was April Fool's Day. "Fishing is in my blood," said Hallock, 47. "Since I was a little fella, there was never any doubt as to what I wanted to do."
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