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By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2002
In November, months before anyone was thinking about filling swimming pools or watering the grass, Westminster officials implemented water-use restrictions to help replenish the city's water sources after an especially dry summer and autumn. Since that time, drought conditions across the state have worsened, causing municipalities - and the state of Maryland - to pass water-use restrictions of their own. Westminster's restrictions, however, are more stringent than those issued by Gov. Parris N. Glendening last week, leading some of the 30,000 people served by the city's water and sewer system to wonder which guidelines prevail.
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By Ellen Nibali and David Clement and Ellen Nibali and David Clement,Special to the Sun | July 28, 2007
Your tomato publication says to give producing plants 1 to 2 gallons of water twice a week during dry spells. I water with a hose, so how can I know how much water I'm giving them? Fill a bucket to 2 gallons with your hose at its regular setting. As you fill it, count aloud until the bucket is full. Whatever number your reach, count to that number when watering a plant and you'll know that you've given it 2 gallons of water. Counting to half the number yields 1 gallon. Huge brown and yellow hornets are buzzing around our door at night.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 20, 2004
Residents of Taneytown may resume outdoor water use after the lifting of a mandatory emergency restriction yesterday. Mayor W. Robert Flickinger issued an emergency executive order June 15 imposing restrictions on outdoor uses such as filling pools, washing cars and watering lawns. He took the action after the city's public works director warned that its equipment could fail from overuse while being strained to make up for the temporary loss of the town's best well. Well No. 13 had been closed since fall for installation of carbon filters to remove a cleaning solvent that registered above the federal standard for drinking water.
NEWS
By Dahleen Glanton and Dahleen Glanton,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 19, 2007
ATLANTA -- North and South Carolina are fighting over a river. In Tennessee, springs are drying up, jeopardizing production of Jack Daniels whiskey. The mayor of Los Angeles is asking residents to take shorter showers. And in Georgia, the governor is praying for rain. More than one-third of the United States is in the grip of a menacing drought that threatens to make its way into Illinois and other Midwestern states before the summer ends. While much of the West has experienced drought for close to a decade, the latest system is centered over Alabama and extends to much of the Southeast, afflicting Georgia, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, North and South Carolina and Virginia as well as parts of Arkansas and West Virginia.
NEWS
September 14, 1995
Parts of Maryland haven't had rain in nearly 40 days and 40 nights, since Aug. 6, and the lack of moisture is taking its toll. Soybeans and corn are burning up in the fields. Even the most carefully maintained lawns have taken on a brown tinge. Many trees -- usually covered with a late summer growth of deep green leaves -- prematurely have taken on fall colors of yellow, red and brown.The record dry spell has hit hardest on the Eastern Shore, according to the National Weather Service. Meteorologists consider that part of the state to be in extreme drought.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 22, 1998
Manchester has become the last municipality in the county to LTC relax water-use restrictions for residents.Mayor Elmer Lippy announced last week that Manchester residents may resume most outdoor water activities, such as washing cars and watering gardens."
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2001
With the possibility of the second dry summer in three years, Gov. Parris N. Glendening called on Marylanders yesterday to voluntarily reduce water use in the hope that conservation - and rain - will help avoid the painful statewide restrictions of 1999. The governor also said at a news conference that he was signing an executive order asking state agencies to set a goal of cutting their water consumption 7 percent by 2003 and 10 percent by 2010. He said he hopes the agencies will provide an example for citizens.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | September 1, 1995
As water use hits the high mark, lack of rain has caused water reserves to dip below average.In the past week particularly, local use has increased significantly, said Wayne Lewns, chief of the county bureau of utilities. He has asked residents of the county-operated system in South Carroll to conserve water use."We are not in a panic mode," he said. "We are just asking people to curtail outdoor use."In South Carroll, Freedom District Water Treatment Facility has been operating at or above its 3 million-gallons-per-day capacity for the past week, he said.
NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and David L. Greene and Jennifer Sullivan and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1999
In Carroll County, some town leaders aren't waiting for police officers to fine residents who defy the governor's water restrictions by watering lawns or washing cars.Mount Airy Mayor Gerald Johnson is up at the crack of dawn to hunt for violators, fining residents as much as $100. He will continue his twice-daily prowls as long as the water ban remains.Council President R. Delaine Hobbs, chairman of the town's sewer and water committee, is also patrolling -- once a day.In New Windsor, Mayor Jack A. Gullo Jr. said he wouldn't hesitate to report "chronic" violators, but the matter is in the hands of state police, who patrol the small town.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2000
Manchester will go drilling for water again, thanks to a grant from the Carroll County commissioners. Town Manager Philip L. Arbaugh said $25,000 for water exploration has been awarded to the town through the county's Economic Development Trust Fund. "That's a real nice Christmas present," Mayor Christopher B. D'Amario said after the announcement earlier this month. "In the last five years, I bet we've drilled close to eight to 10 wells," the mayor said. "Every time you punch a hole, it's about $10,000, so it's very costly to look for water.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 20, 2004
Residents of Taneytown may resume outdoor water use after the lifting of a mandatory emergency restriction yesterday. Mayor W. Robert Flickinger issued an emergency executive order June 15 imposing restrictions on outdoor uses such as filling pools, washing cars and watering lawns. He took the action after the city's public works director warned that its equipment could fail from overuse while being strained to make up for the temporary loss of the town's best well. Well No. 13 had been closed since fall for installation of carbon filters to remove a cleaning solvent that registered above the federal standard for drinking water.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2004
Water pressure in Taneytown bounced up to near normal almost immediately after the mayor imposed mandatory restrictions on most outdoor uses last Thursday, officials said yesterday. The restrictions were tightened Tuesday evening by Mayor W. Robert Flickinger, who changed the penalty for violating the restrictions that ban outdoor uses such as filling pools, washing cars and watering lawns. His new order eliminates a grace period that officials feared might increase water use. His original order provided for only warnings until Monday but now allows fines after one warning.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2004
The mayor of Taneytown imposed water restrictions yesterday - banning outdoor uses such as filling pools, washing cars and watering lawns - after a warning that all five of the town's wells have been working overtime and that the equipment could fail. Mayor W. Robert Flickinger issued the executive order after learning Wednesday that the local Public Works Department and the Maryland Department of the Environment had recommended the restrictions. "We have five wells that have been running 24 hours a day, seven days a week" except for brief shut-offs, City Manager Gary W. Hardman said yesterday.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2002
Edwin Grimmel Jr. stands beside an all-but-empty, 10-foot-deep pond that spans three-quarters of an acre on his Jarrettsville farm. This is the first time it has dried up since the pond was dug more than 50 years ago. The pond, fed by a spring, dried up three weeks ago. Saturday's thunderstorms left an inch or two of water in the bottom - nowhere near enough for one cow, let alone all his livestock. Grimmel, whose family has owned the 245-acre farm since the early 1900s, is luckier than most - he has a well that he can tap to fill water troughs for his animals.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2002
Life under mandatory water restrictions in the Baltimore area changed little during the weekend, and neither did the hot, dry weather that forced the new rules. A trickle of extra vehicles turned up at carwashes as motorists were prohibited from hosing them down in the driveway. Gardeners warily eyed new plants that would demand hand watering, with sprinklers on the banned list. "There's definitely a reluctance," said Carrie Engel, manager of the plant department at Valley View Farms nursery in Cockeysville, where shoppers shied away from purchasing thirsty new shrubs and trees.
NEWS
April 14, 2002
Robey urging compliance with water-use limits Howard County Executive James N. Robey is urging residents and businesses to comply with mandatory restrictions in Gov. Parris N. Glendening's executive order declaring a drought emergency in Central Maryland. Well users in the western part of the county must reduce the use of their water under "Level One Restrictions." Included are prohibitions against watering lawns; washing paved surfaces (including tennis courts and patios); using sprinklers for irrigation, gardens and landscaped areas - although hand-held containers and hoses with automatic shut-off can be used; using water for ornamental purposes; and noncommercial washing of cars, trucks and boats.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and David Clement and Ellen Nibali and David Clement,Special to the Sun | July 28, 2007
Your tomato publication says to give producing plants 1 to 2 gallons of water twice a week during dry spells. I water with a hose, so how can I know how much water I'm giving them? Fill a bucket to 2 gallons with your hose at its regular setting. As you fill it, count aloud until the bucket is full. Whatever number your reach, count to that number when watering a plant and you'll know that you've given it 2 gallons of water. Counting to half the number yields 1 gallon. Huge brown and yellow hornets are buzzing around our door at night.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2002
In November, months before anyone was thinking about filling swimming pools or watering the grass, Westminster officials implemented water-use restrictions to help replenish the city's water sources after an especially dry summer and autumn. Since that time, drought conditions across the state have worsened, causing municipalities - and the state of Maryland - to pass water-use restrictions of their own. Westminster's restrictions, however, are more stringent than those issued by Gov. Parris N. Glendening last week, leading some of the 30,000 people served by the city's water and sewer system to wonder which guidelines prevail.
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