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Watergate

NEWS
By Michael Schudson | June 17, 1992
A THIRD of America's population was not born or not yet in kindergarten when, 20 years ago today, burglars working for the Committee to Re-Elect the President were arrested breaking into Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate hotel complex in Washington.It's no wonder that the memory of Watergate has grown dim.A survey of high school students in 1986 found that one in three could not place Watergate as an event that happened after 1950 and one in five associated it with the resignation of some president other than Richard Nixon.
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NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | February 10, 1997
BOCA RATON, Fla. -- As the 25th anniversary of the Watergate break-in and cover-up approaches, five major figures from that most devastating political scandal gathered here the other day to consider its lessons and legacy.The beleaguered administration of President Richard Nixon was represented by John Dean, the then-youthful White House counsel who warned Nixon of a ''cancer growing on the presidency'' and subsequently went to jail in the conspiracy, and by Leonard Garment, another counsel who advised Nixon not to destroy the tapes that eventually triggered his resignation.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | June 17, 1992
The script for tonight's CBS special, "Watergate: The Secret Story" (at 9 o'clock, WBAL-Channel 11), divides the segments into "Act I," "Act II," and so on. And why not? The story of a "third-rate burglary" that toppled a president remains great theater 20 years later.Indeed, the chronological presentation by Mike Wallace gnaws away at some of the remaining mysteries about the June 17, 1972, break-in at the Democrat National Headquarters in the Watergate apartment complex. The burglars were nabbed in the act, and eventually traced back to the committee to re-elect President Richard M. Nixon.
NEWS
By Henry L. Trewhitt and Henry L. Trewhitt,Special to The Sun | June 12, 1994
Events in the Oval Office on Monday, March 20, 1973, reveal much of the Nixon presidency in shorthand. The president began the day schmoozing with Republican leaders, a chore he disliked. Party loyalty was necessary but inhibiting. The meeting did give him ideas, however, about deflecting criticism of official secrecy by proving that Lyndon Johnson was worse.The twilight of Watergate was settling in. But Nixon and his closest aides still underestimated its implications, nine months after the event.
NEWS
By STEVEN DORNFELD | June 17, 1992
Over the last two decades, the Watergate break-in and the revelations that followed have faded from memory, even for those of Americans who sat transfixed in front of their televisions as the scandalous affair unfolded.H.R. Haldeman and John Ehrlichman, John Mitchell and G. Gordon Liddy, Rose Mary Woods and the 18 1/2 -minute gap, the presidential declaration, ''I am not a crook,'' and the senatorial inquiry, ''What did the president know and when did he know it?'' -- all are a little hazy today.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMONROGER SIMON | October 25, 1993
To James Kilby, raising money for Frank Wills was simply the Christian thing to do."I'm a Christian, and it's Christians against the world, so to speak," said Kilby, who founded TEAR (Treat Every American Right) in Anne Arundel County last year. "Our purpose is to reach back to those people who have made a contribution to society and didn't get full recognition. Frank is an unsung hero."In reality, however, Wills, the security guard who discovered the Watergate burglary in 1972, has gotten considerable recognition, well as jobs and money over the years.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | February 24, 1992
The five-term ex-congressman sits down next to me on the plane and starts right in."I guess the press learned its lesson about Bill Clinton," he crows.I have a rule against striking up conversations on airplanes. They are even more perilous than conversations in bars. Because in bars you can always say: "Sorry, gotta go stick some money in the meter."Try that on an airplane.Clinton? I say. What about him?"All that draft stuff," the guy says. "All that tabloid stuff. The public sent you guys a message."
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and By James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | May 19, 2002
An even 50 years have gone by since the publication of Invisible Man. Eight years ago, Ralph Ellison died. With this much perspective, the question may be put impartially: How did the African-American author of a single major novel attain the literary heights? The best answer, of course, is to read or reread the book -- and to mingle with people across the racial divide. Still, what manner of man was Ellison, successively this Oklahoma City boy, Alabama college dropout, 15-cents-an-hour menial worker, veteran of the New York culture wars and, ultimately, friend of the famous?
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2002
Watergate conspirator G. Gordon Liddy regaled a federal jury in Baltimore yesterday with details of the covert political mission that eventually brought down a president, telling how he shredded documents and hundred-dollar bills after the famous 1972 break-in and matter-of-factly warned his wife that he was headed to jail. But as to the purpose of the botched burglary at the Democratic National Committee, Liddy said he learned only years later the explanation he now believes is true - that the burglars were secretly directed by then-White House counsel John W. Dean III to find pictures that could have linked Dean's future wife to a call-girl ring.
NEWS
June 19, 1997
FOR AMERICANS who lived through the tumultuous Watergate years that began a quarter-century ago this week, it was a time of national trauma. From that point on, the public's perception of politics and presidents would never be the same.What began as a "third-rate burglary" (in the words of a White House spokesman) of Democratic Party offices in the Watergate Hotel slowly evolved into a crisis of immense proportions that shook the democratic foundations of government. A president resigned in disgrace rather than face impeachment.
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