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By Steve McKerrow | June 17, 1992
The script for tonight's CBS special, "Watergate: The Secret Story" (at 9 o'clock, WBAL-Channel 11), divides the segments into "Act I," "Act II," and so on. And why not? The story of a "third-rate burglary" that toppled a president remains great theater 20 years later.Indeed, the chronological presentation by Mike Wallace gnaws away at some of the remaining mysteries about the June 17, 1972, break-in at the Democrat National Headquarters in the Watergate apartment complex.The burglars were nabbed in the act and eventually traced back to the committee to re-elect President Richard M. Nixon.
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NEWS
June 20, 2012
Those who remember the long national nightmare of Richard Nixon's Watergate scandal and doubt that it could happen today need only to keep an eye on current events ("House panel sets contempt vote for Holder," June 12). Any potentially high-level security threat to the nation such as the Justice Department's "Fast and Furious" program cannot be handed off to an attorney general who is one step away from being declared in contempt of Congress. There needs to be a thorough, totally independent investigation of this matter.
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NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | June 16, 1997
ARLINGTON, Va. -- It was 25 years ago tomorrow that agents of the Richard Nixon re-election campaign broke into Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate office complex and set in motion the biggest political scandal of the century.To commemorate the anniversary, an assortment of interested DTC parties gathered the other day at the Newseum, the new museum chronicling the history of news gathering, to consider the legacy of Watergate. They concluded that good and bad came out of it.The greatest good was Nixon's removal from office, sparing the nation an impeachment ordeal, in what former Sen. George McGovern, the Democratic presidential nominee that year, called ''the mother of all White House scandals.
NEWS
July 22, 2006
Harry Olivieri, 90, who with his brother Pat was credited with inventing the Philly cheesesteak in 1933, died of heart failure Thursday at a hospital in Pomona, N.J. Despite a heart condition, he had showed up at Pat's King of Steaks almost every day until about three years ago, his daughter Maria said. He and his older brother opened a corner hot dog stand near South Philadelphia's Italian Market in 1930. Three years later, they made the first version of the sandwich that helped put the city on the street food map. Tired of hot dogs, Pat suggested that Harry go to a store and buy some beef.
NEWS
June 20, 2012
Those who remember the long national nightmare of Richard Nixon's Watergate scandal and doubt that it could happen today need only to keep an eye on current events ("House panel sets contempt vote for Holder," June 12). Any potentially high-level security threat to the nation such as the Justice Department's "Fast and Furious" program cannot be handed off to an attorney general who is one step away from being declared in contempt of Congress. There needs to be a thorough, totally independent investigation of this matter.
NEWS
July 27, 1995
Rabbi Baruch Koff, 81, known as "Nixon's rabbi" for his close relationship and staunch defense of the president during the Watergate scandal, died yesterday of pancreatic cancer in Providence, R.I.Rabbi Korff met Richard M. Nixon in 1967 when Nixon was running for president. He founded the National Citizens Committee for Fairness to the Presidency in 1974 to defend Nixon from Watergate charges.He stayed in contact with Nixon after the president's resignation in 1974 and wrote the book, "The President and I," which was released this year.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 27, 1994
YORBA LINDA, Calif. -- Although international relations dominated Richard M. Nixon's long career, no foreign heads of state or government are expected for his funeral today at the library that his friends built on the site of the failed citrus orchard where he grew up.Mr. Nixon counted as his greatest accomplishments the normalization of relations with China and detente with the Soviet Union. But no high-powered delegation is coming from Beijing, which will be represented by a deputy prime minister, Zou Jiahua.
NEWS
June 26, 1991
Did key figures in the 1980 Reagan-Bush presidential campaign cut a secret deal with the Iranians to extend the captivity of American hostages in order to manipulate the election?We do not know the answer to that deeply troubling question but, as is indicated in an article today on the opposite page, the evidence continues to fall into place like a jigsaw puzzle that such a cynical pact might indeed have been reached. The latest piece comes from the ABC television news program "Nightline," working in conjunction with London's prestigious newspaper, the Financial Times.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 6, 1998
NEW HAVEN, Conn. -- Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman's hometown reacted with relief to his extraordinary rebuke of President Clinton on the floor of the Senate on Thursday, with both Democrats and Republicans saying that he spoke for them, and that it was about time someone did.Danny Charleston, 53, a bus driver for Connecticut Transit who voted for Clinton twice, said he watched the speech live on CNN, flipped the channels to catch clips Friday morning, then listened...
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 30, 2002
WASHINGTON - In the emerging Enron scandal, the White House has made itself a target by asserting executive privilege to shield the inner workings of Vice President Dick Cheney's task force that last year shaped President Bush's energy policy. But there is plenty of precedent for doing so. Through the years, White House privacy claims for secret meetings and conversations have been invoked by Republicans and Democrats alike in fending off prying eyes and ears. Administrations of both parties have justified business done in private as imperative to ensure that presidents and their chief subordinates receive candid counsel from those called to advise them.
NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano and Richard A. Serrano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 7, 2005
L. Patrick Gray III, acting director of the FBI during the Watergate crisis who surfaced publicly last month for the first time in three decades to decry the revelation that his top assistant was the Deep Throat character who leaked information about the scandal, died yesterday. Mr. Gray, 88, died shortly after midnight at his home in Atlantic Beach, Fla., of complications from pancreatic cancer. A former Navy submariner and lawyer who later met then-Rep. Richard M. Nixon and eventually found himself at the helm of the federal law enforcement agency, Mr. Gray was denounced by critics who believed he tried to deep-six the Watergate scandal by keeping the Nixon White House apprised of the FBI's investigation into the matter.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2005
YinYin Yu, Melinda Kenny scrapped her lesson plans for yesterday's honors philosophy class at Catonsville High School. Instead, she seized this week's teachable moment - the revelation of the identity of Deep Throat, the famous confidential source to The Washington Post during the Watergate scandal - and shaped her 90-minute class around a discussion of his ethics. Three students came out strongly in defense of W. Mark Felt's decision to guide reporter Bob Woodward, and the public's right to know the behavior of its elected leaders.
NEWS
Sun Staff | June 1, 2005
June 13, 1971 The Pentagon Papers -- classified Defense Department documents about the Vietnam War -- are published by The New York Times. Sept. 3, 1971 A group of White House aides burglarizes a psychiatrist's office to find files on Daniel Ellsberg, the former defense analyst who leaked the Pentagon Papers. June 17, 1972 Five men, one claiming to be a former CIA operative, are arrested at 2:30 a.m. trying to bug the offices of the Democratic National Committee at the Watergate hotel and office complex.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 18, 2002
WASHINGTON - Policing the influence of money in politics is a lot like policing the use of drugs on racehorses to enhance their performance. Every time a way to clamp down on either one is developed, the fixers come up with a new way to achieve the same end. In horse racing, it's often a new drug that can't immediately be detected. In politics, it's finding another way to funnel the green stuff into a campaign for a candidate or a particular cause. Now that the modest Shays-Meehan campaign finance reform bill has been passed by the House and sent to the Senate, where a very similar bill has already been approved, it looks like curtains for unregulated "soft" money flowing directly into such campaigns.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 30, 2002
WASHINGTON - In the emerging Enron scandal, the White House has made itself a target by asserting executive privilege to shield the inner workings of Vice President Dick Cheney's task force that last year shaped President Bush's energy policy. But there is plenty of precedent for doing so. Through the years, White House privacy claims for secret meetings and conversations have been invoked by Republicans and Democrats alike in fending off prying eyes and ears. Administrations of both parties have justified business done in private as imperative to ensure that presidents and their chief subordinates receive candid counsel from those called to advise them.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2001
A small-town girl from Mississippi who studied piano at the local Baptist college and played the organ in church, Ida "Maxie" Wells hardly seemed destined 30 years ago to wind up in the history books. Yet Wells became a sort of female Forrest Gump in 1970s Washington. Like the movie character who kept turning up in the front row of history, Wells found herself in the midst of Watergate as a young secretary at Democratic Party headquarters and later worked in the West Wing for President Jimmy Carter.
NEWS
By Richard A. Serrano and Richard A. Serrano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 7, 2005
L. Patrick Gray III, acting director of the FBI during the Watergate crisis who surfaced publicly last month for the first time in three decades to decry the revelation that his top assistant was the Deep Throat character who leaked information about the scandal, died yesterday. Mr. Gray, 88, died shortly after midnight at his home in Atlantic Beach, Fla., of complications from pancreatic cancer. A former Navy submariner and lawyer who later met then-Rep. Richard M. Nixon and eventually found himself at the helm of the federal law enforcement agency, Mr. Gray was denounced by critics who believed he tried to deep-six the Watergate scandal by keeping the Nixon White House apprised of the FBI's investigation into the matter.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2005
YinYin Yu, Melinda Kenny scrapped her lesson plans for yesterday's honors philosophy class at Catonsville High School. Instead, she seized this week's teachable moment - the revelation of the identity of Deep Throat, the famous confidential source to The Washington Post during the Watergate scandal - and shaped her 90-minute class around a discussion of his ethics. Three students came out strongly in defense of W. Mark Felt's decision to guide reporter Bob Woodward, and the public's right to know the behavior of its elected leaders.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 6, 1998
NEW HAVEN, Conn. -- Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman's hometown reacted with relief to his extraordinary rebuke of President Clinton on the floor of the Senate on Thursday, with both Democrats and Republicans saying that he spoke for them, and that it was about time someone did.Danny Charleston, 53, a bus driver for Connecticut Transit who voted for Clinton twice, said he watched the speech live on CNN, flipped the channels to catch clips Friday morning, then listened...
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 7, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Fred Thompson may have to call upon every theatrical trick he ever picked up in his movie career as he opens the long-delayed hearings on campaign fund-raising abuses this week.The Tennessee Republican faces a climate of partisan sniping so bitter it nearly derailed the hearings, an expectation that there will be no real surprises and -- perhaps most of all -- a public already inured to politicians' questionable money-grubbing ways.Still, in hearings that begin tomorrow and are scheduled to last through the end of the year, Thompson -- who honed his prosecutorial skills as Republican counsel to the Senate Watergate committee, and his dramatic flair in a score of Hollywood films -- will try to "tell the story" of what happened in the 1996 campaign.
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