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NEWS
May 17, 2013
In comparing the Watergate cover-up to the Benghazi cover-up, the crimes involved are completely different but still crimes ("Benghazi deserves real review," May 9). The purpose for the cover-ups, though, was the same: to re-elect the president. Nobody died at Watergate. Four Americans died at Benghazi. As yet no survivors of Benghazi have been interviewed, to my knowledge. If they have, why shouldn't the American people have a right to know what was divulged? The president during Watergate resigned, the president during Benghazi should certainly do the same.
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NEWS
Jules Witcover | August 15, 2014
In the flurry of new books on the Nixon tapes, another allegation worse than Watergate against the late president has been revisited by a researcher at the Miller Center of the University of Virginia, reviving charges of a possible treasonous act by Richard Nixon during the Vietnam war. Ken Hughes, in "Chasing Shadows: The Nixon Tapes, the Chennault Affair and the Origins of Watergate," makes the case that a planned break-in of the Brookings Institution in Washington, which Nixon urged as a blatant "thievery," sought to find and get rid of such evidence.
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NEWS
By Art Buchwald | October 21, 1992
AS usual the situation is normal in Washington. The FBI is investigating the Justice Department and the Justice Department is investigating the FBI. "Is it another Watergate?" I asked Looney Toons, a Bush tour director. I asked the question because the Justice Department and the CIA had admitted to covering up evidence concerning a U.S. loan deal to Iraq."It's not going to be a Watergate," he replied angrily. "For the simple reason that Justice has appointed its own people to investigate it, and the CIA has called on its own inspector general to look into the CIA's role.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | August 9, 2014
On the occasion of this week's 40th anniversary of Richard Nixon'sresignation from the presidency, The Washington Post  sponsored a reunion featuring Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, the Watergate reporters who "brought down" the 37th president. In fact, Nixon committed political suicide. He thought he could get away with what other politicians had done, but forgot the rules are different for Republicans. The Post event resembled a celebration with much laughter and stories about how Publisher Katharine Graham and Executive Editor Ben Bradlee had told the newsroom "no gloating" when it became apparent Nixon would resign.
FEATURES
By Cox News Service | October 11, 1990
John Ehrlichman was in London recently to talk about a new three-hour television documentary on Richard Nixon's life done by WGBH-TV in Boston.He says he does not, quoting from his former boss, "wallow in Watergate."But 13 years after leaving prison for his Watergate crimes, Mr. Nixon's one-time chief domestic policy adviser, has not escaped Watergate's shadow, and he also hasn't shied away from it.So, when the ghosts of Watergate were summoned in the documentary, Mr. Ehrlichman, 65, agreed to go to London to discuss it.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 19, 2012
At the 40th anniversary of the Watergate break-in of the Democratic National Committee headquarters, an act that eventually led to the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon, the chief lesson seems hopelessly lost. The lesson was this: Of all the corrupting influences in politics, beyond the anything-goes mentality that can drive participants to excess in their quest to win, none takes a back seat to unlimited and unaccountable money. When the Nixon political apparatus got caught red-handed illegally entering the DNC offices on the night of June 17, 1972, one of the first responses, as Nixon himself said, was to find the funds that could buy the silence of the apprehended burglars.
NEWS
July 11, 1991
In a major development in the seemingly stalled Iran-contra investigation, Alan D. Fiers Jr., a top-level CIA operative in the Reagan presidency, has pleaded guilty to his role in the secret,illegal deal to sell arms to the Iranians and divert the proceeds to the Nicaraguan rebels. Already Fiers has directly implicated the third-ranking CIA official in the illegal scheme, and it is all but certain that still others will be implicated -- including those who have told Congress they knew nothing of the deal.
NEWS
By PAUL WEST | March 13, 1994
Washington. -- Now that the spreading stain of Whitewater has oozed into the White House, no one can say for sure how this affair will end.But let's make one thing perfectly clear: Whitewater is no Watergate.Certainly, there are parallels, superficial and otherwise, between the scandal that ended Richard M. Nixon's presidency and the mess Bill Clinton's in.Echoes of Watergate can be heard in the cries alleging a White House cover-up and potential abuses of power, in the growing demands for hearings on Capitol Hill and the spectacle of White House aides dragged before a grand jury by a vigorous special prosecutor.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 27, 1992
MIAMI -- Richard Gerstein, 68, one of Florida's most colorful and influential prosecutors, died of an apparent heart attack early yesterday.The towering, imposing prosecutor gained national prominence in 1973 by winning the first conviction in the Watergate scandal that would eventually force the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon.His conviction of Bernard Barker on money-laundering charges in Miami linked the White House directly with the 1972 burglary at the Democratic Party's headquarters in the Watergate complex in Washington.
NEWS
June 17, 1992
Twenty years ago today, burglars with connections to the White House were arrested after they had broken into the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate complex in Washington. That break-in led to an organized conspiracy carried out by President Richard Nixon and his aides to use the law enforcement powers and agencies of the executive branch of the federal government to cover up official involvement with the crime. That in turn led to Mr. Nixon's forced resignation in disgrace, the only presidential resignation in the nation's history.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 24, 2014
Former Democratic National Chairman Robert S. Strauss, who passed away Wednesday at a robustly lived 95, was a happy political warrior whose talent and energies took him far afield from his chosen playground, even to Moscow where he served as the first American ambassador after the collapse of the Soviet Union. He was a rare combination of straight-talker and schmoozer who endeared himself to friend and foe alike, to the point that when he left Russia in 1993, he was given a huge vodka-flowing reception at the Russian Embassy in Washington.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 13, 2014
Not since Richard Nixon assured an audience of newspaper editors in 1973 that "I am not a crook" has a major political figure so conspicuously defended his character as New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie has done in declaring, "I am not a bully. " The governor's remark in a mea culpa news conference in Trenton came in the context of the brouhaha over the closing of George Washington Bridge traffic lanes into the town of Fort Lee on the Jersey side. It was ordered by Mr. Christie aides as a vengeful act against the town's Democratic mayor, who had not supported the governor's re-election campaign last year.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 23, 2013
The release of the last 340 hours of the Nixon White House tapes adds little to what we know by now about the first American president to resign. Indeed, the final installment doesn't tell us much more than we should have known about him long before the first tapes were ever released. Except for documenting his excessive use of profanity, his contempt for many political figures including those working for him, and his galloping personal insecurity, the real Richard Nixon was always there to be seen.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | August 15, 2013
Why is the nation more bitterly divided today than it's been in 80 years? Why is there more anger, vituperation and political polarization now than even during Joe McCarthy's anti-communist witch hunts of the 1950s, the tempestuous struggle for civil rights in the 1960s, the divisive Vietnam War, or the Watergate scandal? If anything, you'd think this would be an era of relative calm. The Soviet Union has disappeared and the Cold War is over. The civil rights struggle continues, but at least we now have a black middle class and even a black president.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 9, 2013
To a lifelong newspaperman, the abrupt sale of an iconic publication like The Washington Post seems akin to a personal loss, a death in the family, although the prospective new owner vows to keep it afloat. The Graham family brought a particular dedication and zest to holding the powerful in the nation's capital to account that meant more to laborers in the vineyards of The Post than a weekly paycheck, which in any event was never astronomical. The four years I toiled there, during the heyday of publisher Katherine Graham and unsurpassable editor Ben Bradlee in the early 1970s, were literally right out of arguably the best newspaper movie ever made, "All the President's Men," based on the nonpareil reporting of the Watergate scandal by youngsters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein that won the paper a Pulitzer Prize in 1973.
NEWS
May 17, 2013
In comparing the Watergate cover-up to the Benghazi cover-up, the crimes involved are completely different but still crimes ("Benghazi deserves real review," May 9). The purpose for the cover-ups, though, was the same: to re-elect the president. Nobody died at Watergate. Four Americans died at Benghazi. As yet no survivors of Benghazi have been interviewed, to my knowledge. If they have, why shouldn't the American people have a right to know what was divulged? The president during Watergate resigned, the president during Benghazi should certainly do the same.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | June 12, 1991
The image of Richard Nixon as a statesman widely consulted around the world has once more run up against the counter-image of vindictive and petty schemer. Newspapers and television broadcasts have rightly reported that the tapes just released by the National Archives do not contain any more proofs of guilt in the Watergate affair. But they contain something worse.These tapes show that Mr. Nixon was prepared to go further and do things worse than anything that had occurred before in his administration.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 17, 2013
When the storm of administration scandals first hit President Barack Obama, he offered a good impersonation of Claude Raines in "Casablanca," expressing shock that gambling was going on in Rick's saloon. His verbal outrage at the snooping of the IRS and his Justice Department was intense, but not very reassuring. That's why the next day he announced the dismissal of the acting IRS director as a quick response to the disclosure of the tax agency's intrusion, which was reminiscent of the Watergate era. But on Thursday, Mr. Obama declined to apologize for his administration's reactions to the Benghazi terrorist attacks and for the secret scrutinizing of Associated Press reporters' phone calls.
NEWS
By David Horsey | May 14, 2013
Republicans could make an easy hit on the Obama administration by highlighting the State Department's apparent bureaucratic blundering during and after the deadly terrorist attack on the American consulate in Benghazi, Libya, last fall, but they refuse to settle for such a small political prize. Instead, they have got themselves all steamed up and snarling about heinous, impeachable offenses that are figments of their imaginations. The latest round of House hearings about the Benghazi incident provides a perfect example of how American politics has been warped and gummed up by bombastic, partisan extremism.
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