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BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
While the city reviews proposals to invigorate the Inner Harbor, the Greater Baltimore Committee unveiled a vision of its own, highlighted by a pedestrian bridge that would link the north and south shores, allowing visitors for the first time to walk a complete circle around the downtown waterfront. Leaders of the business group also proposed light and water shows for the harbor, and three different ideas for turning Rash Field on the south shore into a world-class park. The bridge would be built high enough above the water that most sailboats and water taxis could travel underneath.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
Since last June, Towson University radio station WTMD has upgraded its studio, its satellite reception and now adds the headliners of First Thursdays, its free outdoor concert series that takes place between May and September, to the list. Rock stalwarts The Hold Steady (Sept. 4), blues brothers Los Lonely Boys (June 5), "One of Us" singer Joan Osborne (May 1) and sunny pop-folkers The Mowgli's (Aug. 7) are scheduled to take the First Thursdays stage this year, Scott Mullins, the station's program director, told The Baltimore Sun. A headliner for the July 3 event is still to be determined.
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NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1999
A much-debated housing development on Greenspring Avenue will feature fewer homes and a 22-acre public waterfront park under an agreement hammered out this week between the developer and a Baltimore County councilman.With the agreement, the county avoids a lengthy court battle over how many homes can be built at the Greenspring Quarry just inside the Beltway. The quarry is closing its mining operations, turning the gaping rock pit into a 500-foot-deep lake surrounded by offices, stores, condominiums and single-family houses.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 25, 2012
Proving once again that it's always better to be late than not at all, the state has finally completed a new "nature area" at Masonville Cove , the second act in a $153 million restoration of a longtime dumping ground on the southern side of Baltimore's harbor. Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown and assorted dignitaries turned out Wednesday to mark the official opening of the 11-acre waterfront park, which features walking trails and a pier for fishing or launching canoes and kayaks.  Brown joined students from the Friendship Academy in planting wetland grasses along a shoreline once strewn with rubble but now covered with a layer of clean white sand.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2003
Jeannette Hillyer used to go with her young family down the hill to Port Deposit's waterfront, where they would put in a little boat on the Susquehanna River, next to the Navy's bustling marina and jetty. You couldn't miss the activity next door in those post-World War II boom days, said the 80-year-old Cecil County native, who lives just outside Port Deposit, a town of about 700 people tucked along the riverbank. Sailors from Bainbridge Naval Station filled the jetty, waiting to clamber into one of the 108 whaleboats docked there so they could practice maneuvers up and down the river.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
As thousands of late-night revelers partied to thumping electronic dance music in the graffiti-marked remains of an old fort in Baltimore last month, some overdosed on drugs or became overwhelmed by the heat, according to a report by the city fire marshal. While the overnight Starscape festival at Fort Armistead Park stretched into the early-morning hours, emergency medical crews from the city and Baltimore and Anne Arundel counties struggled to keep up with calls for help from the venue, responding to the park "continuously" for 12 hours, the report says.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1999
Standing on the cliffs of the Oakington farm near Havre de Grace, overlooking the tranquil waters of the Chesapeake Bay, it is easy to see why Harford County officials want to preserve the property.The sweeping grounds boast shoreline bluffs 40 feet above the bay, allowing for a scenic view of the water.With the recent $3 million purchase of the 328-acre farm, Harford officials have added another key piece in their quest for a waterfront park on the bay, south of Havre de Grace."Harford County has such a small amount of true bayfront land available because much of it belongs to Aberdeen Proving Ground," said Arden Holdredge, director of planning and zoning in the county.
NEWS
December 18, 1994
White sails and large vessels once were a familiar sight on the Choptank River. Cambridge was a major base for oyster boats and a coastal port that accommodated ocean-going freighters. As the oysters and the food-packing plants that attracted the freighters have dwindled, so has the water traffic and the fortunes of the Dorchester County seat.But not for much longer, if Cambridge business and community leaders have their way. After several false starts, they have embarked on transforming the Cambridge waterfront into a festival park and magnet for tourists that should brighten the city's future.
NEWS
April 23, 1993
*TCWaterfront park for Allied siteWith the proposed development of the AlliedSignal Inc. site now under consideration, a rare opportunity exists for the development of a grand waterfront park upon a portion of what is clearly the most prominent waterfront site along the northwest branch of the Patapsco.The November, 1988, Baltimore waterfront study called for by Mayor Kurt Schmoke, commissioned by the city and performed by Notter Feingold and Alexander, Inc., urged that the entire 18-acre Allied site as well as adjacent property west of Caroline Street be developed as parkland.
NEWS
By From staff reports | June 10, 1999
In Baltimore CityMan, 31, charged in 65 burglaries, mostly in Forest ParkA man has been charged with a six-month burglary spree in which an estimated $50,000 in property -- from jewelry to television sets -- was stolen from 65 homes in Northwest Baltimore, police said yesterday.Castle Guy Blair, 31, of the 3800 block of Fairview Ave. was charged this week with 65 counts of burglary and was ordered held without bail at the Baltimore City Detention Center, said Sgt. Jim Rood of the Northwestern District major-crimes unit.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
As thousands of late-night revelers partied to thumping electronic dance music in the graffiti-marked remains of an old fort in Baltimore last month, some overdosed on drugs or became overwhelmed by the heat, according to a report by the city fire marshal. While the overnight Starscape festival at Fort Armistead Park stretched into the early-morning hours, emergency medical crews from the city and Baltimore and Anne Arundel counties struggled to keep up with calls for help from the venue, responding to the park "continuously" for 12 hours, the report says.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
While the city reviews proposals to invigorate the Inner Harbor, the Greater Baltimore Committee unveiled a vision of its own, highlighted by a pedestrian bridge that would link the north and south shores, allowing visitors for the first time to walk a complete circle around the downtown waterfront. Leaders of the business group also proposed light and water shows for the harbor, and three different ideas for turning Rash Field on the south shore into a world-class park. The bridge would be built high enough above the water that most sailboats and water taxis could travel underneath.
ENTERTAINMENT
By sam sessa and sam sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | July 2, 2009
The biggest nightlife event this weekend isn't a crazy dance party or a concert by a hot new band - it's the Fourth of July fireworks display downtown. Since the annual holiday falls on a Saturday, bars, restaurants and clubs are going to be busy all day and night. And no part of town will be more flooded with revelers than the Inner Harbor. Restaurants there will fill up fast, traffic will be tied in a knot, and it could take as long as half an hour to hoof it across Harborplace. Though the Light and Pratt street pavilions offer front-row seats for the annual fireworks at 9:30 p.m., they're not the only harborside spots with great views.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,sun reporter | June 27, 2007
Canton's Waterfront Park - a favorite fishing spot and dog park along the harbor - will be expanded by 2 acres by 2009 under a plan unveiled by Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon yesterday. Dixon said a maintenance yard and trash skimming facility adjacent to the park would be moved by 2009 - opening approximately 2 acres that will be used for parkland. City officials said specifics of the plan would come before the Board of Estimates later this year. "Our waterfront is one of the most valuable resources we have," Dixon said in a statement.
NEWS
By ERIC SIEGEL | August 10, 2006
This week, I attended two events within two hours - and two miles - of each other in the two Baltimores. Yes, one was in the middle of the Baltimore of glittering waterfront development and the other in the Baltimore of depressing urban decay. But the contrast was deeper than that. One was of a vision exceeded; the other, of a concept just now showing nascent signs of being realized. At noon Tuesday, I went to a celebration of the 25th anniversary of the opening of the National Aquarium - and a dedication of a new waterfront park in front of its entrance.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | May 16, 2005
The next major expansion of the National Aquarium in Baltimore will be a campus, not a single building, so it's no surprise that aquarium officials have turned to one of the country's leading campus planners to design it. Ayers Saint Gross of Baltimore heads a team selected to design the $27 million Center for Aquatic Life and Conservation overlooking the Middle Branch of the Patapsco River. Another Baltimore firm, Struever Bros. Eccles & Rouse, will be the construction manager. The Center for Aquatic Life and Conservation will house the aquarium's rapidly growing animal collection for current and future exhibits, and provide space for programs in animal husbandry, conservation education and research, including a waterfront park open to the public.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,sun reporter | June 27, 2007
Canton's Waterfront Park - a favorite fishing spot and dog park along the harbor - will be expanded by 2 acres by 2009 under a plan unveiled by Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon yesterday. Dixon said a maintenance yard and trash skimming facility adjacent to the park would be moved by 2009 - opening approximately 2 acres that will be used for parkland. City officials said specifics of the plan would come before the Board of Estimates later this year. "Our waterfront is one of the most valuable resources we have," Dixon said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
By sam sessa and sam sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | July 2, 2009
The biggest nightlife event this weekend isn't a crazy dance party or a concert by a hot new band - it's the Fourth of July fireworks display downtown. Since the annual holiday falls on a Saturday, bars, restaurants and clubs are going to be busy all day and night. And no part of town will be more flooded with revelers than the Inner Harbor. Restaurants there will fill up fast, traffic will be tied in a knot, and it could take as long as half an hour to hoof it across Harborplace. Though the Light and Pratt street pavilions offer front-row seats for the annual fireworks at 9:30 p.m., they're not the only harborside spots with great views.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2004
PORT DEPOSIT -- This historic Susquehanna River town will take a big step toward becoming a Cecil County tourist attraction tomorrow when it begins advertising for bids on the construction for a long-planned restoration of its waterfront property. Plans call for the development of a waterfront park and marina and reconstruction of a jetty that the Navy built during World War II. Sailors attending boot camp at the Bainbridge Naval Training Center, on a plateau above town, would pack the pier, waiting to clamber into one of the more than 100 whaleboats docked there so they could practice maneuvers up and down the river.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2003
Jeannette Hillyer used to go with her young family down the hill to Port Deposit's waterfront, where they would put in a little boat on the Susquehanna River, next to the Navy's bustling marina and jetty. You couldn't miss the activity next door in those post-World War II boom days, said the 80-year-old Cecil County native, who lives just outside Port Deposit, a town of about 700 people tucked along the riverbank. Sailors from Bainbridge Naval Station filled the jetty, waiting to clamber into one of the 108 whaleboats docked there so they could practice maneuvers up and down the river.
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