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NEWS
By Edward Gunts | November 15, 1990
Afraid that a new developer will try to buy the American Can Co. property on Boston Street and build a project the Canton community doesn't want, area residents have come up with their own plans for the site.Members of the Waterfront Coalition, a neighborhood group that monitors development in East Baltimore, unveiled plans last night that call for the former canning-factory property to be converted to a mixed-use project containing low-cost housing for the elderly, a supermarket, neighborhood-oriented shops and a public plaza.
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BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | July 7, 2009
Just 12 blocks separate the old headquarters of Legg Mason at 100 Light St. in downtown Baltimore from its glassy new headquarters at 100 International Drive in Harbor East. But it's a quantum leap for the global asset manager - and the city that fought to keep it in town. The 24-story Legg Mason Tower is part of a wave of waterfront development that marks an expansion and redefinition of Baltimore's downtown - from a relatively compact core with a well-defined business district to a new, linear city that encircles the harbor, with eight miles of shoreline and companies and residences spread out all along the water's edge.
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NEWS
November 14, 1990
East Baltimore community groups have prepared a plan to make the former American Can Co. complex on Boston Street into a supermarket, apartments for the elderly and stores.Members of the Waterfront Coalition, whose members represent Canton, Fells Point and Butchers Hill, admit they lack funds to purchase the 9.3-acre property at Boston and Hudson streets, but want a say in its fate."This is the first time a neighborhood group has come up with its own plan for a site. Now we're looking for developers who will be sympathetic to the communities around it," said Lily Adlin, a member of the Waterfront Coalition who has a business in Fells Point.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2004
The $130 million Four Seasons hotel and residence project, billed as an "urban resort," at Harbor East received preliminary approval from the city's design panel yesterday, opening the way for construction to start. Plans are to break ground by the end of summer and to open as early as 2006. Members of Baltimore's Design Advisory Panel praised the work done by Hill Glazier Architects of Palo Alto, Calif., in simplifying the design of the project, which is to feature 200 hotel rooms, 26 to 28 condominiums, spa facilities and retail space.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1997
A coalition of neighbors filed suit yesterday to block construction of the 41-story Wyndham Hotel, alleging that the city violated state law when it approved the project.The suit filed in Baltimore Circuit Court alleges that when the project was reviewed by the City Council's land-use committee Nov. 20, city officials did not allow opponents to ask questions and did not keep a transcript of the hearing -- both required under state land-use laws.The lawsuit filed by the Scarlett Place Residential Condominium Association and the Waterfront Coalition -- an umbrella group of nine homeowner and business groups -- asks that the ordinances enacted as a result of that hearing be stricken from the city's books.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1999
The state's highest court has agreed to hear two cases that challenge the legality of a 31-story hotel under construction east of the Inner Harbor.The Court of Appeals' decision to hear the cases involving the $134 million Wyndham International Inner Harbor East hotel marks the third time that the upscale lodging project has faced a legal challenge.The Waterfront Coalition of Baltimore Inc., a loose affiliation of 11 neighborhood groups, asked the court to hear the cases in an effort to block the 750-room hotel being developed by a group led by John Paterakis Sr.In one of the cases, the Court of Appeals will decide if the hotel may receive $75 million in tax breaks provided by the city.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1998
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge has ruled that a lawsuit to block construction of a 31-story Wyndham Hotel in Inner Harbor East may proceed, but he has declined to stop the hotel's progress while the suit goes forward.In an opinion issued Wednesday, Circuit Judge Richard T. Rombro dismissed a similar suit brought by the Scarlett Place Residential Condominium Association and the Waterfront Coalition, an umbrella group of nine homeowner and business groups, saying the groups lacked standing to challenge the procedures the City Council followed when it passed two bills in December to make way for the hotel.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | August 30, 1991
Just north of the luxury town houses, condominiums and boat slips that hug the rejuvenated "Gold Coast" of Canton, the vacant and boarded up American Can Co. complex on Boston Street stands as an unwanted symbol of the area's industrial past.Developers came and went during the 1980s with plans for high-rise condo towers, multiplex cinemas and maritime-oriented shops and restaurants, but still the derelict can factory hangs on, a large and ugly vestige of Canton's history as Baltimore's Cannery Row.Concerned that the abandoned factory has been a blight on the community for too long, two local non-profit groups have applied for a $500,000 federal grant to help fund the first phase of a new shopping center they would like to see built on the site.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2004
The $130 million Four Seasons hotel and residence project, billed as an "urban resort," at Harbor East received preliminary approval from the city's design panel yesterday, opening the way for construction to start. Plans are to break ground by the end of summer and to open as early as 2006. Members of Baltimore's Design Advisory Panel praised the work done by Hill Glazier Architects of Palo Alto, Calif., in simplifying the design of the project, which is to feature 200 hotel rooms, 26 to 28 condominiums, spa facilities and retail space.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1999
The state's second-highest court has upheld a Baltimore Circuit Court ruling that said the 31-story Wyndham Inner Harbor East hotel does not violate a master plan created to guide development in the area near Little Italy.The Court of Special Appeals' ruling on a lawsuit challenging a city ordinance permitting the Wyndham essentially ends a community group's chances to further stall or derail the $134 million project on planning grounds.John C. Murphy, an attorney for the Waterfront Coalition Inc., said the group intends to petition Maryland's highest court to hear the case.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1999
The state's highest court has agreed to hear two cases that challenge the legality of a 31-story hotel under construction east of the Inner Harbor.The Court of Appeals' decision to hear the cases involving the $134 million Wyndham International Inner Harbor East hotel marks the third time that the upscale lodging project has faced a legal challenge.The Waterfront Coalition of Baltimore Inc., a loose affiliation of 11 neighborhood groups, asked the court to hear the cases in an effort to block the 750-room hotel being developed by a group led by John Paterakis Sr.In one of the cases, the Court of Appeals will decide if the hotel may receive $75 million in tax breaks provided by the city.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1999
The state's second-highest court has upheld a Baltimore Circuit Court ruling that said the 31-story Wyndham Inner Harbor East hotel does not violate a master plan created to guide development in the area near Little Italy.The Court of Special Appeals' ruling on a lawsuit challenging a city ordinance permitting the Wyndham essentially ends a community group's chances to further stall or derail the $134 million project on planning grounds.John C. Murphy, an attorney for the Waterfront Coalition Inc., said the group intends to petition Maryland's highest court to hear the case.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1998
Residents fighting the construction of the 31-story Wyndham Inner Harbor East Hotel lost another battle yesterday when a Baltimore Circuit judge dismissed the second of three lawsuits filed to halt the hotel.In a sharply worded opinion, Judge Richard T. Rombro did not agree with the residents' claims that the city had violated its development plan when it approved the hotel."This court does not doubt the sincerity of the plaintiffs, but sincerity and zeal cannot overcome the facts and the law in this case," Rombro wrote in the opinion released yesterday.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | June 24, 1998
Three members of a neighborhood coalition have filed a lawsuit challenging the legality of the tax exemption for the proposed Wyndham Inner Harbor East Hotel.The lawsuit, filed in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday by members of the Waterfront Coalition, is an effort to reduce the size of the project. The suit names as defendants the mayor and the City Council, along with three partnerships connected with the Inner Harbor East Hotel. It seeks an injunction, alleging that such action is necessary to prevent the loss of public funds from tax exemptions.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1998
A Baltimore Circuit Court judge has ruled that a lawsuit to block construction of a 31-story Wyndham Hotel in Inner Harbor East may proceed, but he has declined to stop the hotel's progress while the suit goes forward.In an opinion issued Wednesday, Circuit Judge Richard T. Rombro dismissed a similar suit brought by the Scarlett Place Residential Condominium Association and the Waterfront Coalition, an umbrella group of nine homeowner and business groups, saying the groups lacked standing to challenge the procedures the City Council followed when it passed two bills in December to make way for the hotel.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | January 17, 1998
Opponents of the proposed 41-story Wyndham Hotel filed another suit in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday to block its construction, alleging that the City Council violated its development plan when it approved the project.The suit alleges that the council failed to adhere to its Urban Renewal Plan, which limits the height of any waterfront building on the 20-acre Inner Harbor East tract to 120 feet.The 19-member council amended the plan Dec. 18 to allow H&S Properties Development Corp. to build a 430-foot-high hotel.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | August 14, 1998
Residents fighting the construction of the 31-story Wyndham Inner Harbor East Hotel lost another battle yesterday when a Baltimore Circuit judge dismissed the second of three lawsuits filed to halt the hotel.In a sharply worded opinion, Judge Richard T. Rombro did not agree with the residents' claims that the city had violated its development plan when it approved the hotel."This court does not doubt the sincerity of the plaintiffs, but sincerity and zeal cannot overcome the facts and the law in this case," Rombro wrote in the opinion released yesterday.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1998
Key leaders of the General Assembly said yesterday that they would not support a bill that could block construction of the 41-story Wyndham Inner Harbor East hotel, a project that has been criticized because it would require more than $40 million in public subsidies.House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller said yesterday that they would not support legislation that would force the city to win voter approval before spending public money on the controversial $132 million project.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1997
A coalition of neighbors filed suit yesterday to block construction of the 41-story Wyndham Hotel, alleging that the city violated state law when it approved the project.The suit filed in Baltimore Circuit Court alleges that when the project was reviewed by the City Council's land-use committee Nov. 20, city officials did not allow opponents to ask questions and did not keep a transcript of the hearing -- both required under state land-use laws.The lawsuit filed by the Scarlett Place Residential Condominium Association and the Waterfront Coalition -- an umbrella group of nine homeowner and business groups -- asks that the ordinances enacted as a result of that hearing be stricken from the city's books.
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