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NEWS
June 10, 2011
We have a potentially wonderful 7-mile waterfront park from Canton to Fort McHenry that should become Baltimore's Central Park. While the Inner Harbor is the center of this, we should be thinking beyond it and taking advantage of greater opportunities. This is more important on many levels than just adding more Inner Harbor attractions. We need to bring major benefits to the whole area for residents and visitors alike. If we want a balance of amenities for both, we need to strongly incorporate the primarily residential waterfront areas beyond the Inner Harbor where neighborhoods meet the water.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
The home at 409 Patapsco Ave. in Essex is no run-of-the-mill raised rancher. "This is an exceptional opportunity to purchase a waterfront home that is fully renovated inside," said Michael Schiff, the listing agent with Keller Williams Legacy. The house, priced at $325,000, is on one-eighth of an acre. The tree-filled backyard leads down to the waters of the Back River, with views of the river from the rear deck. The open floor plan features a living room and breakfast room that opens to a galley kitchen, which measures 21 feet long - larger than most galley designs.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2014
Impressive views of Harbor East, Little Italy, Federal Hill and the Baltimore waterfront can be found from the windows of this seventh-floor condominium at Spinnaker Bay. With an asking price of $975,000, the property at 717 President St. offers three bedrooms, two bathrooms and a powder room. Listing agent Cindy Conklin of Prudential Homesale YWCG Realty calls it one of the best deals in the Spinnaker Bay high-rise complex. The condo's open-floor design features ample space for a large living room, dining room and den, all opening onto a kitchen and breakfast room.
FEATURES
By Christianna McCausland and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
When Ward Westrick retired from commercial real estate development, he and wife Ginny were happy to sell their home in McLean and leave the density of Northern Virginia behind to settle on the Chesapeake Bay's calmer shores. While Ward may have made a living in development, he and Ginny did not want to build a home. However, after looking at as many as 50 houses from Gibson Island to Mayo and finding nothing but disappointment, they snapped up a 2.25 acre parcel on the South River in Annapolis (before it was even listed)
NEWS
October 8, 2003
IT MAY TAKE years to absorb all the lessons for storm preparation that Isabel recently left behind, but one message is already clear: Those who don't treat the shoreline with respect will likely regret it. Houses built too close to the water were smashed to bits; waterfront property cleared of trees and wetlands was washed away. Litter and other debris dumped along bay and river banks - or directly into the water - were spit back into flooded basements and living rooms. The often tentative, hesitant approach toward land-use restrictions to protect the Chesapeake Bay employed by politicians, bureaucrats and courts was overruled by surging seas.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
CAMBRIDGE — This historic Eastern Shore city offers a glorious view of the Choptank River, but its working waterfront is a forlorn place. The once-thriving tuna canneries are long gone, and a failed port now sits at the mouth of Cambridge Creek, hosting occasional concerts and weddings. Cambridge officials are pushing a plan to revitalize the waterfront by redeveloping that parcel. They hope an Annapolis developer's plan for a $50 million mixed-use development will attract retirees and young professionals, as well as upscale stores and restaurants, and boost the city's long-struggling economy.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | May 31, 2013
There's both energy and change moving along Southeast Baltimore's waterfront in Canton and Fells Point. It's become the neighborhood boom of 2013, involving more than 800 new apartments and the construction of a shopping plaza along Boston Street in Canton at one-time industrial and commercial locations. Like Harbor East's surprise transformation a decade ago, the changes in Southeast Baltimore require some touring for learning purposes. It's a story that involves the pushing back of an industrial area plus a tricky piece of cosmetic construction and surgery in a historically protected section of commercial Fells Point.
NEWS
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
A waterfront bungalow on Nabbs Creek in Anne Arundel County awaits the buyer who appreciates living right off the Chesapeake Bay. The two-story brick and vinyl-sided home at 434 Carvel Beach Road, with an asking price of $479,900, is part of a quaint established community. "This is probably the best-priced waterfront property in Anne Arundel County," said listing agent, Jennifer Sowers of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. "The property offers 4-plus feet of water depth [at the pier]
NEWS
July 24, 2013
Two recent Sun pieces ( Susan Reimer 's column "Annapolis whiffs on City Dock again," July 11, Mayor Josh Cohen's op-ed, "City Dock plans restores luster of Annapolis' crown jewel," July 18) both about the Annapolis City Dock, questioned the motives of those who have asked questions about the plan and who are trying to slow down a rush to pass a massive ordinance (07-13) to implement an incomplete plan. The ordinance would set up a new maritime zone that is maritime in name only, as the uses allowed in this "maritime zone" are furniture stores, hotels, ice skating rinks and much more.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2012
The man who runs many of Baltimore's marinas, a former captain in the Israeli navy, prefers the sky to the sea. The only boat he owns is a gondola, which he keeps tied up at his marina in Canton. "I love aviation; that's my passion," said Dan Naor, 47, chief operating officer of Baltimore Marine Centers, as he stood next to a cherry-red helicopter on a recent weekday. He flies it - not as often as he'd like - from Pier 7 in Canton, the base of another business he runs, Baltimore Helicopter Services.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
A Columbia-based real estate developer wants to build four glassy office buildings on its waterfront property in Canton, a project that could create a kind of Harbor farther East. Corporate Office Properties Trust's proposal calls for shopping, restaurants and four buildings with about 250,000 square feet of offices on top of several stories of parking, said Stephen Budorick, the real estate investment trust's executive vice president and chief operating officer. The company has no time frame for when the project could begin because it is seeking tenants before committing to construction, Budorick said.
NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
An Inner Harbor ice rink is set to open by Nov. 21, and an ongoing fundraising effort will determine how large it will be, according to the Waterfront Partnership. The organization has hired Virginia-based Rink Management Services Corp. to construct and operate a rink at McKeldin Square, said Laurie Schwartz, president of the partnership. It's scheduled to be open through Martin Luther King Jr. weekend in late January. It will bring ice skating back to the Inner Harbor for the first time in about a decade, though at a different location than its longtime home at Rash Field.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | September 26, 2014
A Canton condominium owned by Baltimore author Tom Clancy is slated for settlement next month, according to court documents. The Clancy estate is the subject of a legal battle between his widow and the former executor. The 2,379-square-foot unit in the Canton Cove building on Boston Street came under contract for $660,000 in September.  The court approved a petition to sell the property Sept. 17, a day after attorneys for J.W. Thompson Webb sought permission for the deal.
NEWS
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
What does it take to win the National Association of Home Builders' 2010 Best in American Living Awards? In the case of one particular winning home - a coastal Maryland mansion - it takes an owner with a vision and an equally qualified design visionary to make the dream a reality. Off a narrow lane on Ocean City's Assawoman Bay, Bill and Shelby Allen's three-story home sits regally at the water's edge in defiance of all elements, both natural and architectural. “I wanted a Northern Atlantic, Nantucket-style cottage - coastal [and]
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
On Maryland's Eastern Shore, 6201 Swan Creek Road in Rock Hall reaches new heights in property ownership. A classic 19th-century farmhouse and a charming waterfront cottage sit on a private peninsula consisting of 177-plus acres of farmland. With gorgeous views of the Chesapeake Bay, the main farmhouse has been meticulously restored by the owner from the foundation up - including a major addition completed in 1998 that nearly doubles the living space. This has allowed for a modern kitchen, family room, guest room and an office.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For the Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Three nautical miles from downtown Annapolis but seeming worlds away is the private peninsula where Mill and Burley creeks meet the Chesapeake Bay - and where 2077 Maidstone Farm Road, a nine-acre estate with 2,000 feet of waterfront, awaits its new owner. A Tudor-style home built of stucco in 1916 harks back to an era of elegant living. Touches of period craftsmanship outside and inside were provided by Italian artisans commissioned by the home's owner and builder, James Bowdoin, great-grandson of the founder of Bowdoin College in Maine.
NEWS
July 22, 1993
Some Anne Arundel County Council members seem eager to believe the cries of developers and property owners that County Executive Robert R. Neall's new Chesapeake Bay "critical areas" bill is too strict. Already they've hacked a proposed 50-foot buffer around non-tidal wetlands to 25 feet, thus proving they care more about meeting minimum legal requirements than protecting the shoreline.Before they relax any more restrictions, they should remember that such changes may hurt the property owner in the long run. No one's dream of a waterfront home will come true in 10, 25 or 50 years if the bay and its tributaries are dead.
NEWS
By Angela Winter Ney and Angela Winter Ney,Staff Writer | December 12, 1993
Residents of a Severna Park waterfront community voted overwhelmingly last week against a proposed marina expansion they said would spoil the view.At a meeting Tuesday, residents voted 93-34 against a proposal to expand the marina by 18 slips."
NEWS
By Gary J. Katz | July 29, 2014
Two years ago I moved to Baltimore, where the roads are littered with pot holes (and litter) - I should know because I've had to circle them to find parking. Two of my housemates have had their cars broken into, my high taxes make my escrow payments exceed my mortgage, and a train bellows its horn in my neighborhood at all hours of the night. So it surprises me that in my first public request of this city, I am simply asking for it's leaders to do nothing at all. I am a 33-year-old professional, and I am a demographic that every city fights to have.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
Wayne and Wende Allen found a second home, their vacation escape, in a convenient location - 24 miles from their Harford County home. "Most of our friends who have second homes have them at the beach, in the mountains down south," said Wende Allen, a 46-year-old physician's assistant at a fertility clinic in Bel Air. "That's where you typically think your vacation home should be, hours away. But we have found our paradise retreat in our same county, our same comfortable community; yet it feels like we've escaped.
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