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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | September 4, 1994
After three public meetings and consultation with its Wildlife Advisory Commission, the Department of Natural Resources has submitted its 1994-95 waterfowl hunting season and bag limit selections for federal approval.The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is expected to approve Maryland's proposals, which include expanded hunting dates for most species of ducks and Canada geese."These seasons and bag limits are designed to maximize hunting opportunity while continuing to allow populations to increase," DNR Secretary Torrey C. Brown said Friday, when the selections were announced.
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From Sun staff reports | September 6, 2014
Archery hunting for white-tailed deer opened statewide Friday and continues through Jan. 31. New this year, hunters in Region A may take only two antlerless deer for the license year. Also new, a hunter may not harvest more than two white-tailed deer within the yearly bag limit that have two or fewer points on each antler present. Any additional antlered deer taken within the legal seasons and bag limits must have at least three points on one antler. Junior Hunting License holders are exempt from the antler point restriction.
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November 1, 1992
Almost three decades ago, when Ray Marshall of Newcomb was a fledgling waterfowl hunting guide on the Eastern Shore, the Canada goose was king. But these days, with the goose kill restricted and goose hunters hesitant to hire guides, Marshall has been taking a different approach to waterfowl hunting."
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | February 1, 2014
Experienced waterfowl hunters are invited to introduce young people to the sport during a Junior Waterfowl Hunting Day on Saturday. On this date, hunters 15 years old or younger may hunt ducks, geese, mergansers and coots on public and private lands when aided by a qualifying adult. To participate, junior hunters must be accompanied by an adult at least 21 years old. All young hunters and their adult mentors must possess a Maryland hunting license or be exempt from the hunting license requirement.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2004
ABOVE THE RAPPAHANNOCK RIVER - Because it takes one to know one, Jim Wortham flies low and fast toward the river. His quarry, bobbing on the surface and resting in marsh grass, begin to rise in pairs and flocks, their shadows and the shadow of the pontoon plane skimming together along the brown water. As the formation sorts itself out, Wortham starts his head count, a sophisticated game of duck, duck, goose, with some swans thrown in for good measure. "As a biologist, there's no better perspective," says Wortham, a Baltimore resident who has been with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for eight years.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | September 6, 2014
Archery hunting for white-tailed deer opened statewide Friday and continues through Jan. 31. New this year, hunters in Region A may take only two antlerless deer for the license year. Also new, a hunter may not harvest more than two white-tailed deer within the yearly bag limit that have two or fewer points on each antler present. Any additional antlered deer taken within the legal seasons and bag limits must have at least three points on one antler. Junior Hunting License holders are exempt from the antler point restriction.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1996
In the past few years, increasing numbers of women have been participating in outdoor sports, with significant growth in areas such as fly fishing, deer and waterfowl hunting, watersports and hiking and camping.Recognizing this change, the Department of Natural Resources will hold its second annual "Becoming an Outdoors Woman" workshop Sept. 13-15 at Catoctin Mountain National Park near Frederick."This workshop offers women an opportunity to learn outdoors skills in an atmosphere of camaraderie and support," said DNR Secretary John R. Griffin.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1996
The three-day early muzzleloader hunting season for deer opens Thursday across the state, with an increasing number of hunters expected to be in the field.According to the Department of Natural Resources, the number of hunters using muzzleloading, black-powder weapons has increased steadily over the past few years and the take of deer has increased as well.In the early muzzleloader season last year, hunters took 4,589 deer, an increase of 19 percent over the previous season. The total muzzleloader take, including the two-week winter season, was a state-record 9,831.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman | January 10, 2010
Your goose is cooked at the Inn at 202 Dover What's the deal?: The Inn at 202 Dover, located in a historic mansion near downtown Easton, is offering a Waterfowl Hunting package pegged to migratory goose season. Not only will the inn provide accommodations, but it will also have its chef prepare your goose cooked to order for dinner. The package includes room, breakfast, boxed lunch and dinner each night. A one-night stay is $500, two nights is $900 and three nights is $1,250. A significant other can accompany the hunter and stay in the same room for an additional $125, which includes an in-room massage.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 11, 2010
Your goose is cooked the Inn at 202 Dover What's the deal? The Inn at 202 Dover, located in a historic mansion near downtown Easton, is offering a Waterfowl Hunting package pegged to migratory goose season. Not only will the inn provide accommodations, but it will also have its chef prepare your goose cooked to order for dinner. The package includes room, breakfast, boxed lunch and dinner each night. A one-night stay is $500, two nights is $900 and three nights is $1,250.
SPORTS
By Ellen Fishel, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
Henry Stansbury is pure Maryland. His family has been here since the 1650s. He grew up in Mount Washington, played lacrosse for the Terps in the early 1960s and now splits his time between his houses in Catonsville and on the Eastern Shore. And his love for the state and its history also led him to one of his greatest passions - decoy collecting. Hand-carved decoys, once used for waterfowl hunting and now appreciated as art, have a rich history in the Chesapeake Bay region.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2012
EASTON – Shortly before sunrise, Edwin F. Hale Sr. scatters decoys on the water, preparing for a day of waterfowl hunting on his Talbot County farm. The day dawns cloudy, a good sign because ducks and geese fly low under clouds, Hale says, as he and two hunting buddies settle into a duck blind camouflaged with pine branches along Hunting Creek. At first all is quiet, with no waterfowl to be seen. But Hale, as always, is hopeful. "Then a switch will be turned on and they come in," says Hale, 65, wearing jeans, a camouflage jacket and boots, and carrying duck and geese call horns.
TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
Easton wasn't always an arts destination, with one gallery after another lining its shady, wide-sidewalked streets. For most of its history, hunters would travel to the Eastern Shore town each autumn for a weekend of waterfowl hunting during the November days when the migrating Canada geese flew overhead. Since they would often bring their wives and kids, it made sense to offer some activities for all the visitors. That's why, since 1971, the nonprofit group Waterfowl Festival Inc. has staged an annual event combining Easton's waterfowl hunting heritage with its newer role as a place to appreciate and purchase artwork.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 11, 2010
Your goose is cooked the Inn at 202 Dover What's the deal? The Inn at 202 Dover, located in a historic mansion near downtown Easton, is offering a Waterfowl Hunting package pegged to migratory goose season. Not only will the inn provide accommodations, but it will also have its chef prepare your goose cooked to order for dinner. The package includes room, breakfast, boxed lunch and dinner each night. A one-night stay is $500, two nights is $900 and three nights is $1,250.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman | January 10, 2010
Your goose is cooked at the Inn at 202 Dover What's the deal?: The Inn at 202 Dover, located in a historic mansion near downtown Easton, is offering a Waterfowl Hunting package pegged to migratory goose season. Not only will the inn provide accommodations, but it will also have its chef prepare your goose cooked to order for dinner. The package includes room, breakfast, boxed lunch and dinner each night. A one-night stay is $500, two nights is $900 and three nights is $1,250. A significant other can accompany the hunter and stay in the same room for an additional $125, which includes an in-room massage.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | December 6, 2009
Jack Mercer of Laurel asks: As a recent transplant to Maryland via a military transfer, I'd like some information about waterfowling opportunities. I understand Maryland has some of the best goose and duck hunting around, and I'd like to get my feet wet, literally and figuratively. What would you suggest? Outdoors Girl replies: If you love waterfowl hunting, you've come to the right place. The Maryland Waterfowler's Association (mdwfa.org) is a growing organization that takes its hunting and advocacy roles seriously.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | November 17, 1991
CHESTERTOWN -- Some hours earlier, as Dutch Swonger steered with his knees and juggled a thermos of hot coffee and &&TC small, red cup, we had trundled east on Route 301 and up Route 213 from the Sportsman's Service Center in Grasonville.Before first light, Swonger, a waterfowl hunting guide in Queen Anne's and Kent counties, had begun to talk of the pleasures and pains of the closed world of waterfowl hunting on the Eastern Shore."I've been hunting here for 30 years and had my own guide service for 10 of those," Swonger said, as he refilled the coffee cup and steam condensed on the windshield.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1997
Even though the weather still feels more like summer than fall, the first split of duck season opened yesterday, and over the next several weeks various firearms hunting seasons will open, with several slight changes in regulations.On Junior Hunter Day (Nov. 15) for deer, an antlerless deer can be taken in Allegany, Frederick (zone 1), Garrett and Washington (zone 2) counties without an antlerless permit. Junior hunters who have drawn an antlerless permit, can use it Dec. 12-13 or during the muzzleloader season from Dec. 20 to Jan. 3Telescopic sights can be used on muzzleloader rifles during the late season for deer from Dec. 20-Jan.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | April 20, 2006
Samuel Henry Shriver Jr., an estate and financial planner who was a lifelong outdoorsman and dog trainer, died of lung cancer Saturday at his Glyndon home. He was 74. Mr. Shriver was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. He was a 1949 graduate of Gilman School and earned a bachelor's degree in business from the Johns Hopkins University. He also had served as a member of the 110th Field Artillery of the Maryland National Guard. Mr. Shriver, who was certified as a chartered life underwriter and a chartered financial consultant, began his business career during the 1960s with Monumental Life Insurance Co., where he later was manager of group sales.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2004
ABOVE THE RAPPAHANNOCK RIVER - Because it takes one to know one, Jim Wortham flies low and fast toward the river. His quarry, bobbing on the surface and resting in marsh grass, begin to rise in pairs and flocks, their shadows and the shadow of the pontoon plane skimming together along the brown water. As the formation sorts itself out, Wortham starts his head count, a sophisticated game of duck, duck, goose, with some swans thrown in for good measure. "As a biologist, there's no better perspective," says Wortham, a Baltimore resident who has been with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for eight years.
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