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Waterfowl Festival

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NEWS
By Joe Surkiewicz and Joe Surkiewicz,Contributing Writer | November 7, 1993
This fall, as V-shaped formations of Canada geese wing their way down the Atlantic Flyway across Maryland's Eastern Shore, another kind of migration will take place on the roads leading to the Colonial-era town of Easton.Twenty thousand visitors are expected at this year's 23rd annual Waterfowl Festival Nov. 12-14, which organizers say draws outdoor enthusiasts, art lovers and friends of the Chesapeake Bay from across the United States -- and from around the world.And no wonder: The event is a showcase for the nation's top wildlife artists, carvers and photographers.
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TRAVEL
By Hannah Moulden, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
Washington fallFRINGE If you're into experimental performance and supporting a good cause, check out fallFRINGE, sponsored by Capital Fringe, a nonprofit whose mission is to promote the arts in D.C. fallFRINGE gathers the best performers from past Capital Fringe Festivals and brings them together for a week-long event of performing arts. The array of performers at fallFRINGE includes the Victorian Lyric Opera Company, Sheldon Scott and Michael Merino as they perform comedy, puppetry, drama and more.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2000
It's fall in Easton. The leaves are changing colors, there's a chill in the air and wildlife is all around: geese, ducks, hunting dogs, falcons, cheetahs, African buffalo. At least there will be artworks depicting all of those animals and more tomorrow through Sunday at the annual Waterfowl Festival in Easton. Originally, the festival was held to showcase decoys, carvings and waterfowl art while hunters were in Easton for goose season. As the festival celebrates its 30th year, goose hunting has been suspended on the Eastern Shore but the festival has grown to include more artists from across the country, additional exhibits, family events and entertainment, spreading out over 16 venues.
TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
Easton wasn't always an arts destination, with one gallery after another lining its shady, wide-sidewalked streets. For most of its history, hunters would travel to the Eastern Shore town each autumn for a weekend of waterfowl hunting during the November days when the migrating Canada geese flew overhead. Since they would often bring their wives and kids, it made sense to offer some activities for all the visitors. That's why, since 1971, the nonprofit group Waterfowl Festival Inc. has staged an annual event combining Easton's waterfowl hunting heritage with its newer role as a place to appreciate and purchase artwork.
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Contributing Writer | November 7, 1993
Fall is perfect for a visit to Maryland's Eastern Shore. The landscape is still touched with autumn color, and flocks of wildfowl overhead almost blot out the sun. Next weekend, in addition to the rewards of nature, the annual Waterfowl Festival brings visitors to Easton from all over the country. As the shore's Colonial capital, Easton is known for its many charms, but during Waterfowl weekend the mood is especially festive. Streets are closed to traffic and shuttle buses operate between outlying parking areas and the many festival sites.
NEWS
By Pat Emory and Pat Emory,Contributing Writer | November 1, 1992
When the Waterfowl Festival opens in Easton Nov. 13, for its 22nd consecutive year, it will show off what is arguably the finest collection of waterfowl art, sculptures and carvings assembled anywhere in the world. Yet, many of the 18,000 visitors will have eyes only for the lesser-known ugly ducklings of the show: the working decoys.A few of these artifacts "are spectacular. They're artwork," says Vance Strausburg, co-chairman of the Buy, Sell and Swap Shop at the festival and an avid collector.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 11, 1997
THE WATERFOWL FESTIVAL in Easton will display the work of about 450 wildlife artists from around world, and none finer than the creations of Sykesville resident Al Burk.Burk creates realistic carvings of birds. The iridescent colors on his mallards and the delicate gray-blue hues of his doves captivated me when I visited his home studio. The birds were so realistic that I was sure I would catch one moving."Some carvers paint their birds with an eye more toward the decorative," Burk said. "I try to make my painting as realistic as possible."
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood | November 4, 1990
Easton should be a popular spot next weekend, with wildlife devotees flocking to town in large numbers for the annual Waterfowl Festival, which celebrates its 20th anniversary from Friday to Sunday.The festival is a showcase for renowned waterfowl painters, carvers and photographers. Last year's festival drew over 500 exhibitors. Their work ranged in price from $40 prints to $40,000 carvings. Waterfowl paintings exhibited for sale in the Tidewater Inn's Gold Room go for $700 or as much as $5,000.
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood | November 3, 1991
As autumn touches the Eastern Shore of Maryland, skies darken with wild geese, ducks and other waterfowl wending their way south to winter quarters. The fall migration brings an influx of sportsmen, bird-watchers and naturalists to the shore. Another boon to tourism here is the annual three-day Waterfowl Festival, which draws more than 20,000 visitors to Easton. The festival marks its 21st anniversary from Friday to next Sunday.The old Colonial capital will take on a festive atmosphere as shops and homes are decked out for fall and street-corner vendors offer hot apple cider for sale.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith | November 9, 1991
The handsome shoveler duck stares out of the painting with the complicated mixture of pride and defiance that waterfowl lovers admire. He's guarding his turf: a placid female, a gray patch of shoreline stubble, a glassy sheet of blue. It's a painting about the transitional sensations of the mating season.Artist David T. Turnbaugh photographed the male duck at wood carver Jim Sprankle's pond on the Eastern Shore. He found the female duck swimming in Henry Singer's pond near Westminster. Bringing the two together created a magic moment in duck art history.
TRAVEL
November 8, 2009
Waterfowl Festival Where: : Easton; follow signs to free parking and then use the continuous free bus service to visit the exhibits. When: : 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 15 What: : The three-day festival celebrates and includes art, music, food, wine, games and more. Displays offer fine art to folk art, photographs, paintings and decorative wood carvings and decoys. Demonstrations include sharpshooting, a birds of prey flight show, and duck and goose callers competing in World Championship Calling Contests.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Candy.thomson@baltsun.com | October 18, 2009
Twenty-six years ago, Maryland farmer Robert Bealle finished second in the Federal Duck Stamp art contest, when his painting of redheads lost to a pair of American wigeons. This year, he won by painting a wigeon himself. Bealle beat entries from 223 other wildlife artists from across the country Saturday to win the 2010-2011 Federal Duck Stamp contest held at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Refuge. His oil-on-Masonite painting of the colorful waterfowl will be on the $15 stamp, which is purchased by migratory bird hunters and collectors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [ANDREA GROSSMAN] | November 8, 2007
Waterfowl fest The lowdown -- Don't miss the 37th annual Waterfowl Festival in Easton this weekend. Browse through sculptures, carvings, photographs and wildlife paintings at 12 venues. Watch fly-fishing demonstrations and world championship calling contests. If you go -- The Waterfowl Festival will be held 10 a.m.-6 p.m. tomorrow and Saturday and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $12 tomorrow and Saturday; $10 Sunday; and $24 for multiple days. Children 12 and younger accompanied by an adult are admitted free.
NEWS
May 26, 2006
Lenette "Lenny" Satchell, a homemaker and Easton Waterfowl Festival volunteer, died of cancer May 18 at Memorial Hospi- tal at Easton. She was 61. Born Lenette Dayton in Monroe, La., near Barksdale Air Force Base, where her father was stationed, she was raised in Cambridge and was a 1962 graduate of Easton High School. She attended St. Mary's College and Bard Avon Secretarial School in Baltimore. She worked for Baltimore attorney Earle K. Shawe in the 1960s before moving back to Easton, where she did secretarial work for her family's Dayton Oil Co. After raising her family, she took a job at the R. Fox women's clothing shop.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ashley Burrell | November 11, 2004
Waterfowl Festival Try your hand at fly-fishing or shout your best goose call at the 34th annual Waterfowl Festival in Easton this weekend. Shuttle buses will cart visitors throughout the Talbot County town to more than 15 locations featuring painting, sculpting, carving and decoy galleries, exhibitions and shops. While visitors walk the autumn-colored streets, fine art to folk art will be displayed and for sale. The 34th annual Waterfowl Festival is 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. tomorrow and Saturday and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday in Easton.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | November 8, 2001
Easton's 31st annual Waterfowl Festival Stroll the Colonial streets of Easton this weekend and take in the 31st annual Waterfowl Festival. The three-day celebration of wildlife art features paintings, carvings, sculpture, decoys, crafts, children's activities, food and music throughout the historic Eastern Shore town. Sports fan, art aficionado or family looking for a weekend getaway - the festival's program includes activities to everyone's liking. Visitors can get lessons in fly fishing, watch waterfowl-calling contests, attend shooting exhibitions, bid at a decoy auction and buy wildlife paintings by 19th- and 20th-century masters.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Staff Writer | November 15, 1992
EASTON -- Morten Fadum's works of art don't have much to do with waterfowl, but they do say something about the changing nature of this town's premier annual event, the Waterfowl Festival.The Illinois-based artist assembles larger-than-life-size sculptures of fish in dark wood and glass showcases. The sculptures, painted in patinas of green, pink, silver and brown and appearing to hang from wall hooks ready for cooking, are surrounded by tear sheets from old outdoor magazines, dusty reels and other fishing memorabilia.
NEWS
By Kim Traverso and Kim Traverso,Special to The Sun | November 3, 1991
It's fall on the Eastern Shore, and a cool breeze carries crisp amber leaves and scents of bubbling apple cider through the quaint streets of Easton in Talbot County.Anticipation hangs in the November air, as the town's 8,000 residents wait expectantly for the yearly migration of travelers to their Colonial haven.Two types of visitors flock here. There are the ones with wings -- the geese, ducks and swans that come here from the north until the spring -- and there are those whose love of such feathered creatures bring them here to the annual Waterfowl Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2000
It's fall in Easton. The leaves are changing colors, there's a chill in the air and wildlife is all around: geese, ducks, hunting dogs, falcons, cheetahs, African buffalo. At least there will be artworks depicting all of those animals and more tomorrow through Sunday at the annual Waterfowl Festival in Easton. Originally, the festival was held to showcase decoys, carvings and waterfowl art while hunters were in Easton for goose season. As the festival celebrates its 30th year, goose hunting has been suspended on the Eastern Shore but the festival has grown to include more artists from across the country, additional exhibits, family events and entertainment, spreading out over 16 venues.
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