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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1998
Maryland's Wildlife Division has completed its Midwinter Waterfowl Survey, and Department of Natural Resources officials said yesterday the results were encouraging in light of the warm weather of the past few months."
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SPORTS
By Nate Rabner and The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
Joey Jobes' workshop is a small, two-story building in Havre de Grace, minutes from the Susquehanna Flats at the top of the Chesapeake Bay. The space is dominated by saws, knives, paints and hundreds of blocks in various stages of transforming into ducks, geese and other birds. Most horizontal surfaces are covered in tools and supplies, but Jobes seems to know where everything is. "My life is business," Jobes said. A second-generation decoy carver in the self-proclaimed decoy capital of the world, he has been in his business for most of his 48 years and goes about it with practiced ease.
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NEWS
February 6, 1995
Maryland's annual midwinter waterfowl survey has revealed that the number of waterfowl is higher this year -- 651,300 birds compared with 549,800 last year.The increase was attributed to "a good breeding season for ducks, and a significant increase in the snow goose population," said Maryland Natural Resources Secretary Dr. Torrey C. Brown.The Canada goose population varied only slightly, at 259,200 this year compared with 260,300 last year. State officials would like the number of Canada geese to climb to about 400,000 in Maryland.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | February 1, 2014
Experienced waterfowl hunters are invited to introduce young people to the sport during a Junior Waterfowl Hunting Day on Saturday. On this date, hunters 15 years old or younger may hunt ducks, geese, mergansers and coots on public and private lands when aided by a qualifying adult. To participate, junior hunters must be accompanied by an adult at least 21 years old. All young hunters and their adult mentors must possess a Maryland hunting license or be exempt from the hunting license requirement.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1996
The Midwinter Waterfowl Survey in Maryland this year showed a decrease in total number of waterfowl observed by personnel from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Department of Natural Resources, but also revealed an increase in the number of Canada geese wintering in the state.According to DNR, Canada geese increased from 259,200 last year to 295,000 this January. However, biologists said that count includes an undetermined number of non-migratory birds forced south from other states by deep snow and cold weather.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2004
Herbert Handel Hutchinson, who was known in recent years as the Swan Man of Hoopers Island for his love of waterfowl and efforts to block the government-backed killing of mute swans, died of pneumonia July 2 at Chesapeake Woods Center in Cambridge. He was 88. With his ruddy complexion and white hair, Mr. Hutchinson looked more like a kindly Norman Rockwell figure than an outspoken and determined activist. During the 1980s and 1990s while living in Duxbury, Mass., Mr. Hutchinson caused consternation among local officials when he violated a ban on feeding waterfowl in local ponds.
NEWS
February 10, 1991
Harford Day School will sponsor its 11th annual Waterfowl Show and Sale 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, and from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 17, at 715 Moores Mill Road, Bel Air.This year's showwill feature more than 60 prominent artists, carvers and collectorsfrom the mid-Atlantic region, including the work of Becky Lowe of Crisfield. Her oil and watercolor paintings, such as the one shown above, entitled "On Marshy Hope," document Chesapeake Bay life.Admission: $3 adults; a senior citizen discount will be offered, children under 12 free.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | March 3, 1994
By early this week, wildlife division personnel in Maryland and Virginia had collected more than 4,000 carcasses of waterfowl dead from the recent outbreak of avian cholera.Dead waterfowl, mainly sea ducks, have been collected from shorelines at Sandy Point and Kent Island as far south as Virginia Beach. The greatest concentrations in Maryland have been in Calvert and St. Mary's counties on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay and at Tilghman Island and the south shore of the Choptank River in Talbot and Dorchester counties on the Eastern Shore.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | March 8, 1996
Northern Baltimore County was the scene of two fund-raisers held on the same evening recently. At the lovely Hillendale Country Club, I joined the members and supporters of the Greater Baltimore Chapter Waterfowl U.S.A. Raffles, silent and live auctions and tasty food highlighted this annual fund-raiser.The proceeds raised from the fun-filled party are used to continue the organization's efforts to preserve and protect Maryland's wetlands and to continue to increase the waterfowl population.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | February 21, 1993
Tami and Don Matts had the same thing on their minds as many others who visited Harford Day School this weekend -- ducks, the artificial kind.The young Aberdeen couple collect decoys and knew they'd find plenty to choose from at the school's 13th annual Waterfowl Show and Sale, which continues today until 5 p.m. They spent close to a half-hour surveying the selection of Havre de Grace artist Dan Carson before honing in on a ruddy duck to add to the four...
SPORTS
By Ellen Fishel, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
Henry Stansbury is pure Maryland. His family has been here since the 1650s. He grew up in Mount Washington, played lacrosse for the Terps in the early 1960s and now splits his time between his houses in Catonsville and on the Eastern Shore. And his love for the state and its history also led him to one of his greatest passions - decoy collecting. Hand-carved decoys, once used for waterfowl hunting and now appreciated as art, have a rich history in the Chesapeake Bay region.
HEALTH
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
These are tough times for the ducks that winter on the Chesapeake Bay. Threatened food sources and an imperiled habitat are forcing migrating waterfowl to look for other winter digs. Alicia Berlin hopes to unlock the formula to win them back. In a quiet corner of the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel, the waterfowl biologist and her team are studying captive black ducks and scoters to find ways to make the bay more nurturing and learn more about the birds' time away from the Chesapeake.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2012
Craig R. Unruh, an advertising executive and avid waterfowl hunter, died Sept. 14 of colon cancer at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. He was 61. Mr. Unruh was born in Baltimore and raised on Tunbridge Road in Homeland. He was a 1969 graduate of St. Paul's School, where he had been an outstanding midfielder on the lacrosse team and a key player in the 1969 state championship game. As a student at the University of Maryland, he was a starting midfielder his freshman year, and after earning a bachelor's degree in 1973, continued playing the sport for the University, Chesapeake and Carling lacrosse clubs.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | February 21, 2012
Birders are always on the lookout for unfamiliar avian visitors, and this past weekend was no exception. The weather was great for two-legged and winged creatures alike to be out and about. And though no excuse was needed, really, the Great Backyard Bird Count  has been under way. Veteran birder Kurt Schwarz spied some "neat ducks" that he says don't usually show up in Howard County. The pair of  Redheads and a Greater Scaup pictured here that he photographed were in among some Canada geese on a pond by Clarksville Middle School - proof you don't have to go to a wildlife refuge to spot some interesting wildlife.
EXPLORE
By Jim Kennedy | October 19, 2011
It's that time of year when the Canada geese are on the move. The early October nip in the air seemed to have rousted the big birds into the air and put them into their V-formations for another season. When it comes down to it, I rather like the visiting Canada geese. They leave northern Canadian places like the Ungava Peninsula (which I include only because Ungava is fun to say; similarly, the genus name for toads is fun to say, Bufo; certainly there are others, but I digress)
TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
Easton wasn't always an arts destination, with one gallery after another lining its shady, wide-sidewalked streets. For most of its history, hunters would travel to the Eastern Shore town each autumn for a weekend of waterfowl hunting during the November days when the migrating Canada geese flew overhead. Since they would often bring their wives and kids, it made sense to offer some activities for all the visitors. That's why, since 1971, the nonprofit group Waterfowl Festival Inc. has staged an annual event combining Easton's waterfowl hunting heritage with its newer role as a place to appreciate and purchase artwork.
SPORTS
By Bill Burton | July 23, 1991
One endangered species leads to another, maybe even another, and still another. In reality, it matters not that the term "endangered" is stretching a point; at this time "troubled" species would be more appropriate.LTC But, with few exceptions, it's a one-way street. Troubled leads to the official term "threatened" and then to "endangered" -- the last stop before "extinct."Whoa. I'm getting ahead of myself -- and maybe in these torrid, parched days of late July much of the pessimism is a shake-out from prevailing weather, which certainly is suitable for neither waterfowl nor man. But, digesting the latest federal duck and goose status reports gives one indigestion.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1999
Maryland's midwinter count of waterfowl showed substantial increases over last year in numbers of several duck species and the migrant population of Canada geese, which registered the highest numbers since 1995."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 16, 2010
Henry Miller "Hank" Worthington, a retired hardware executive and music lover who enjoyed waterfowl hunting, died Monday of complications from dementia at his Garrison home. He was 80. Mr. Worthington, the son of a hardware executive and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park and Garrison. He was a 1948 graduate of Gilman School and attended Princeton University, where he played ice hockey and was captain of the skeet shooting team. "He was an expert marksman, a skill inherited from his father, a 13-time Maryland state skeet and trap champion," said a son, Edward H. "Ned" Worthington of Garrison.
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