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By Mike Giuliano | March 21, 2013
When there are 41 artists in the same exhibit, you can expect to see considerable diversity in subject matter and stylistic approach. That's certainly the case for the Baltimore Watercolor Society show at the Columbia Art Center. Some of the artists rely on crisp definitional lines and well-behaved zones of color in their watercolors, while others make the most of their medium's literally fluid properties. Where the watery attributes are concerned, check out Susan Avis Murphy's "Heading Home Beijing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
Metro Meteor, whose abstract paintings rapidly are becoming an art world sensation, might be just a horse. And the 11-year-old bay, like all equines, has a hard time distinguishing reds from greens or browns. Yet Metro's original watercolors have become the runaway favorite at a regional art gallery. He has racked up a combined $130,000 in sales for his paintings and, through a separate licensing agreement, a line of home-decorating products. "Metro is by far our best-selling artist," said Peggy Rock, the director of Gallery 30 in Gettysburg, Pa. There, the horse, who is stabled here in Frederick County, has sold 80 large paintings and 300 miniature works at prices ranging from $80 to $850.
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FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | March 18, 1998
Christine Neill's large-scale watercolors of leafy plants have always been characterized by her mastery of lush and vibrant color, her sometimes dramatic effects of light and shadow, and her ability to suggest landscape without actually depicting it.There was a time, some years ago, when her work appeared to be concerned with nothing more than visual pleasure. In her current show at Gomez, however, her recent work takes on new levels of meaning without losing strength. The visual pleasure's still there, but accompanied by suggestions of personality and emotion and occasional sly humor.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | November 1, 2013
Although watercolor is a medium deployed by both Jing-Jy Chen and Bonita Glaser in the exhibit "2 Artists 2 Views," their distinctive subjects and styles make it easy to distinguish their artwork hanging on the walls of the Bernice Kish Gallery at Slayton House. Jing-Jy Chen works within an Asian tradition that depicts natural subjects with watercolor and ink on paper. Indeed, a tree native to China figures into some of the work. In "Golden Ginkgo," that tree's distinctively shaped leaves are even more pronounced owing to the fact that the artist has a leaf-covered branch set against a pitch-black background.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Contributing Writer | September 21, 1992
It's not surprising that Robert Llewellyn and Don Cook, who have exhibited together before, again share a show at the Nye Gomez Gallery. These artists are interested in schematic representations of, respectively, boats and buildings. Though distinctive in their styles, both tend to treat their rendered objects as pure geometric forms.Mr. Llewellyn, in an artist's statement, mentions the influence of the Chesapeake Bay on his work. His watercolors are anything but pretty representational pictures, however.
NEWS
By Amy P. Ingram and Amy P. Ingram,Contributing Writer | March 24, 1993
Each day, Fern Jacobi stares out the window of her apartment from a leather-bound chair, seeing not just a tree or grass through her 84-year-old eyes, but a potpourri of colors and visual images.And she is anxious for the day when the nagging illnesses of her age will ease and she can begin painting them again.Mrs. Jacobi is the first resident of Ginger Cove Retirement Community in Annapolis to have her watercolors displayed in the gallery off the building's main lobby. Eighteen of more than 60 works, most of them detailed nature studies, will be displayed until March 31.They were selected by the Ginger Cove Fine Arts Committee, whose members were tipped off about Mrs. Jacobi by another resident in the apartment complex off Riva Road near Annapolis High School.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 2, 1998
WATERCOLORS AND photographs by two 30-year residents of west Columbia will be on display at Slayton House Gallery beginning Sept. 10.The Lobby Gallery will feature "Here and There, Then and Now," an exhibit of watercolors by Longfellow artist Bob Kramer. "WILDE LAKE lake," a display of photographs by Wilde Lake resident Nick Vogel, will be hung in the Bill White Room Gallery.Residents may recall Kramer's pen-and-ink sketches of Wilde Lake that were included in the village's 30th anniversary cookbook.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2010
Pamela C. Florenz, a retired commercial artist who also painted landscapes in watercolors, died Sept. 15 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The longtime Timonium resident was 85. Pamela Callahan, the daughter of dairy farmers, was born and raised in Easton. She was a 1940 graduate of Easton High School. After graduating in 1944 from the Maryland Institute College of Art , she worked as a commercial artist with a specialty in women's fashion.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 8, 2003
A federal judge in Washington has all but brought to a close a 20-year fight over the ownership of four watercolors signed by Adolf Hitler and a huge archive of photographs, some used by prosecutors at the post-war Nuremberg trials. The ruling, a 26-page decision issued May 30 by U.S. District Judge Henry H. Kennedy Jr., leaves the works in the possession of the U.S. government. The archive holds 2.5 million images of Germany dating to the 1860s and includes many glamorized pictures of Hitler, some showing him rehearsing his grandiloquent oratory.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | April 7, 2005
An artist sits in front of his easel painting a floral still-life set up on his studio table. The expression he wears is earnest, but also a little melancholy, as if he were contemplating anew the traditional meaning of his subject: the fleeting nature of beauty, and of life itself. Self Portrait With Flowers is one of the highlights of Raoul Middleman's show of paintings and watercolors at C. Grimaldis Gallery. Middleman's images in People and Places: recent paintings and works on paper generally have the unmistakably energetic brushstrokes and quicksilver spontaneity we've come to expect from Middleman's signature artworks.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
It's springtime, and with the beautiful weather and perfect light comes an age-old ritual as artists set up their easels around Maryland. You can find them working in a variety of mediums in Druid Hill Park, roadside in the Green Spring and Worthington valleys, along the winding stone-lined streets of Ellicott City, or on the wharves of St. Michaels and Rock Hall. And among the artists will be many members of the Baltimore Watercolor Society, the nation's third-oldest such organization.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | March 21, 2013
When there are 41 artists in the same exhibit, you can expect to see considerable diversity in subject matter and stylistic approach. That's certainly the case for the Baltimore Watercolor Society show at the Columbia Art Center. Some of the artists rely on crisp definitional lines and well-behaved zones of color in their watercolors, while others make the most of their medium's literally fluid properties. Where the watery attributes are concerned, check out Susan Avis Murphy's "Heading Home Beijing.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | October 11, 2012
Fall and winter have been on Bonita Glaser's mind, and now they're depicted in her exhibit "Familiar Journeys" at the Artists' Gallery in Columbia. Although her subject matter extends beyond those two seasons, viewing the show in mid-October does make you sensitive to every dropped leaf and fallen snowflake. The watercolor medium facilitates the atmospheric effects and overall moods she's going after in her seasonal views. Colors melt and softly glow in these works. In "Autumn Gold," Glaser provides a close-up view of tightly spaced trees in a forest.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
Since her first foray into painting using a kid's watercolor set, Alice Webb has come a long way. Growing up in Annapolis in the 1950s and 1960s, she did needlework and crafted get-well cards for hospital patients at her mother's bidding. But she was never exposed to the fine arts, which weren't a focus of the nuns at St. Mary's Parish, where she attended Catholic school. It wasn't until she had two sons of her own that the Ellicott City resident of 37 years stumbled upon a life-changing aptitude for art when a teacher asked whether she could draw well enough to create a poster for a school fundraiser.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
Since her first foray into painting using a kid's watercolor set, Alice Webb has come a long way. Growing up in Annapolis in the 1950s and 1960s, she did needlework and crafted get-well cards for hospital patients at her mother's bidding. But she was never exposed to the fine arts, which weren't a focus of the nuns at St. Mary's Parish, where she attended Catholic school. It wasn't until she had two sons of her own that the Ellicott City resident of 37 years stumbled upon a life-changing aptitude for art when a teacher asked whether she could draw well enough to create a poster for a school fundraiser.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2012
Jean C. Fulton, an artist who worked in watercolors and metal, and with her husband transformed the derelict Monkton Hotel into a venue for artists and vendors, died Sunday of multiple organ failure at Sinai Hospital. The one-time Monkton and Tuscany-Canterbury resident was 79. The daughter of Wallace Oles and Charlotte Lehman Oles, Jean Carolyn Oles was born in Baltimore and raised on Enfield Road in Homeland. The family had founded the Oles Envelope Co. in 1912. After graduating from Bryn Mawr School in 1951, she attended Goucher College.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | December 4, 1996
Think watercolors and you probably have an image of something modest looking, intimate in scale and delicate in feeling.Not Carolyn Brady's watercolors!Enter the gallery where "Maryland by Invitation: Carolyn Brady" is on view at the Baltimore Museum of Art, and you will be surrounded by famous gardens that are as big as life and so realistic looking that you feel like you can walk in and bury your face in the flowers."The Flowery Path/Hidcote Manor Garden," five feet tall and almost eight feet wide, even has a path in the center to draw you in. On either side, pink and red and white blossoms clusteraround you in grand profusion; in front, a lush green hedge centers on a topiary obelisk.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2012
Emily T. Taliaferro, an artist and former Friends School tennis coach, died of stroke complications April 2 at Roland Park Place. She was 82. Born in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Raymond S. Tompkins, a Sun reporter and later an official of Baltimore's streetcar utility, United Railways, and Marie Lanning, whom he met in Alabama while awaiting a departure to France to cover World War I. She lived as a child at the Lombardy Apartments and...
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2011
Somewhere along the way, Warren G. Sargent decided to stop giving away his watercolor paintings. "As more and more of the old folks were gone and there were fewer new acquaintances to be had, it seemed like a good idea to keep them," the 93-year-old retired architect says. As it turns out, that sentimental decision paved the way for a five-week exhibition of 17 of his landscapes at the Gary J. Arthur Community Center in Glenwood. The display has laid bare the walls of his nearby home of nearly 60 years and sent him back to the drawing board, he said.
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