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By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2011
Somewhere along the way, Warren G. Sargent decided to stop giving away his watercolor paintings. "As more and more of the old folks were gone and there were fewer new acquaintances to be had, it seemed like a good idea to keep them," the 93-year-old retired architect says. As it turns out, that sentimental decision paved the way for a five-week exhibition of 17 of his landscapes at the Gary J. Arthur Community Center in Glenwood. The display has laid bare the walls of his nearby home of nearly 60 years and sent him back to the drawing board, he said.
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By Jacques Kelly, Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2012
Emily T. Taliaferro, an artist and former Friends School tennis coach, died of stroke complications April 2 at Roland Park Place. She was 82. Born in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Raymond S. Tompkins, a Sun reporter and later an official of Baltimore's streetcar utility, United Railways, and Marie Lanning, whom he met in Alabama while awaiting a departure to France to cover World War I. She lived as a child at the Lombardy Apartments and...
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NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | July 24, 2008
Nancy Galloway Manger, a watercolor artist who also worked in real estate in the 1950s, died of complications from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Monday at Woodlands Assisted Living in Middle River. The longtime Towson resident was 89. Born Nancy Edmunds Galloway in Baltimore and raised in Windsor Hills, she was a 1937 graduate of Forest Park High School. An amateur artist in her teens, Mrs. Manger had once considered a career in art, but she put those ambitions on hold to raise a family and pursue other interests.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2011
Somewhere along the way, Warren G. Sargent decided to stop giving away his watercolor paintings. "As more and more of the old folks were gone and there were fewer new acquaintances to be had, it seemed like a good idea to keep them," the 93-year-old retired architect says. As it turns out, that sentimental decision paved the way for a five-week exhibition of 17 of his landscapes at the Gary J. Arthur Community Center in Glenwood. The display has laid bare the walls of his nearby home of nearly 60 years and sent him back to the drawing board, he said.
NEWS
By PAT BRODOWSKI | January 11, 1995
A treat for the eyes begins today in the Great Hall of Carroll Community College when 10 members of the Carroll County Artists Guild show recent works.The show includes about 70 representational works in pastel, oil pastel, acrylic, oil and watercolor media. It is open during regular college hours until Feb. 8.The lineup of artists from around the county features three from the north county area. The artists will be at a reception from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday.The works are grouped by artist, an unusual method of display.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2012
Emily T. Taliaferro, an artist and former Friends School tennis coach, died of stroke complications April 2 at Roland Park Place. She was 82. Born in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Raymond S. Tompkins, a Sun reporter and later an official of Baltimore's streetcar utility, United Railways, and Marie Lanning, whom he met in Alabama while awaiting a departure to France to cover World War I. She lived as a child at the Lombardy Apartments and...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2012
Jeanne T. Welsh, a homemaker who enjoyed painting, died of congestive heart failure March 31 at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Pinehurst resident was 84. Born Jeanne Tribull in Baltimore and raised in Govans, she was a 1944 Eastern High School graduate. She became a secretary at a brokerage, Merrill, Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Beane, where she met her future husband, Joseph Francis Welsh Jr. A watercolor artist, she studied under Fritz Briggs at the Schuler School of Fine Arts.
NEWS
March 1, 2005
Marion J. Stefanowicz, a retired registered nurse and artist, died of pulmonary fibrosis Feb. 22 at her Sparks home. She was 67. She was born Marion Fulker in Baltimore and raised in Gardenville. She was a 1955 graduate of Catholic High School and earned her nursing degree in 1958 from the old Mercy Hospital School of Nursing. Mrs. Stefanowicz was a nurse at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium from 1971 until her retirement in 1996. She was an accomplished watercolor artist who enjoyed painting tidewater Maryland scenes.
NEWS
February 8, 2005
Richard Irwin Kolchin, a retired Aberdeen Proving Ground official and an artist, died of Alzheimer's disease Wednesday at Perry Point Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The Aberdeen resident was 77. Mr. Kolchin was born and raised in New York City, and served in the Navy during the final months of World War II as a seaman aboard the carrier USS Princeton in the Pacific. After the war, he studied mechanical engineering on the GI Bill at New York University, earning his degree in 1948. Mr. Kolchin was drafted into the Army in 1950 and served as an engineer until 1952.
NEWS
By Amy P. Ingram and Amy P. Ingram,Contributing Writer | June 18, 1992
Anne Weikart, 63, knew her painting of several near-naked seniors changing in a college locker room had a good chance of winning first place in the Anne Arundel County Art Competition.Weikart, one of 24 senior winners in Gov. William Donald Schaefer's "Maryland You Are Beautiful" Senior Citizens Arts Competition, will unveil her work -- entitled "Golden Girls" -- at a June 27 ceremony presided over by the governor."I must admit, I was told it would have a chance of winning by several people who viewed it at one of the gallery's I belong to," she said.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | July 24, 2008
Nancy Galloway Manger, a watercolor artist who also worked in real estate in the 1950s, died of complications from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Monday at Woodlands Assisted Living in Middle River. The longtime Towson resident was 89. Born Nancy Edmunds Galloway in Baltimore and raised in Windsor Hills, she was a 1937 graduate of Forest Park High School. An amateur artist in her teens, Mrs. Manger had once considered a career in art, but she put those ambitions on hold to raise a family and pursue other interests.
NEWS
By PAT BRODOWSKI | January 11, 1995
A treat for the eyes begins today in the Great Hall of Carroll Community College when 10 members of the Carroll County Artists Guild show recent works.The show includes about 70 representational works in pastel, oil pastel, acrylic, oil and watercolor media. It is open during regular college hours until Feb. 8.The lineup of artists from around the county features three from the north county area. The artists will be at a reception from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday.The works are grouped by artist, an unusual method of display.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 1996
FISHING SEASON at Pine Valley Park pond begins Saturday with the Manchester Youth Fishing Derby, an annual event that attracts about 50 children.Children 15 and under are welcome to fish for a prize-winner at this three-quarter-acre pond, stocked recently with catfish. Prizes will be awarded for first fish, last fish, most fish caught, longest fish and heaviest fish. Prizes will be awarded in two age groups.The Northern Maryland Bass Club will do the weighing, measuring and registering."Millard McClary of the club has been my 'gofer' for a good many years, and he always brings terrific prizes, anywhere from a fishing rod to bait buckets," said Charlotte Collett, a Manchester councilwoman who is again organizing the derby.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 1998
IT'S THAT time of year again: The Patuxent Art League is preparing for its seventh Open Juried Art Exhibition at the Montpelier Cultural Arts Center in Laurel.The rules are simple. Adult artists are invited to submit one or two works of art suitable for hanging on a wall.The work must be original, mounted, no larger than 41 by 36 inches, weigh less than 40 pounds and must not have been exhibited at the center. Artists can drop off the work on the second floor of the center Dec. 1.All work is assumed to be offered for sale.
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