Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWaterboarding
IN THE NEWS

Waterboarding

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By David H. Rittgers | May 31, 2011
The successful raid on Osama bin Laden's safe house in Pakistan has reinvigorated debate over the role that "enhanced interrogation techniques" have played in fighting al-Qaida. No one is switching sides, which has turned the argument into a theological one between two sets of true believers. Each views the other as heretics. Get over it. The whole debate is pointless posturing. There is no way to prove or disprove the real worth of America's experiment with waterboarding and coercive techniques.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
When the CIA's chief lawyer, John Rizzo, first came across the term "enhanced interrogation technique" shortly after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, he was struck by the phrase's deceptive blandness. The words sounded mild, possibly even salutary. But Rizzo knew they referred to the harshest methods used to elicit information from suspected terrorists in custody, including waterboarding, which mimics the experience of drowning. For Rizzo and others, the "EITs", as they were called, were repugnant but necessary for ensuring the nation's safety.
Advertisement
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | December 14, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The House of Representatives voted yesterday to prevent the CIA from using waterboarding and other harsh interrogation methods that already are banned from use by the U.S. military. The bill, which would fund and set policies for U.S. intelligence agencies, passed 222-199. It now goes to the Senate, where it faces strong Republican opposition. Even if the Senate approves the bill, the White House said in a statement that the president's advisers recommend that he veto it. The White House objects to the interrogation provision and other sections that would increase congressional oversight.
NEWS
By David H. Rittgers | May 31, 2011
The successful raid on Osama bin Laden's safe house in Pakistan has reinvigorated debate over the role that "enhanced interrogation techniques" have played in fighting al-Qaida. No one is switching sides, which has turned the argument into a theological one between two sets of true believers. Each views the other as heretics. Get over it. The whole debate is pointless posturing. There is no way to prove or disprove the real worth of America's experiment with waterboarding and coercive techniques.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 23, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department revealed yesterday that its internal ethics office was investigating the department's legal approval for waterboarding of al-Qaida suspects by the Central Intelligence Agency and was likely to make public an unclassified version of its report. The disclosure by H. Marshall Jarrett, the head of the department's Office of Professional Responsibility, was the first official acknowledgment of an internal review into the department opinions since 2002 that authorized waterboarding and other harsh interrogation methods.
NEWS
By John Nichols | December 17, 2007
Few serious observers of Congress would deny that Speaker Nancy Pelosi has been a disappointing leader for House Democrats. But now she appears to be something more troubling: a serious hindrance to the fight against the use of crude and objectionable torture techniques. Democrats, and Republicans with a conscience, have gotten a good deal of traction in recent months in their battle to identify the use by U.S. interrogators of waterboarding - a technique that simulates drowning in order to cause extreme mental distress to prisoners - as what it is: torture.
NEWS
February 19, 2008
Waterboarding is torture, and torture is not consistent with what we believe in as a nation, regardless of the circumstance. Prosecutors at the Nazi war trials at Nuremberg knew it more than 50 years ago, and many senior intelligence and military officials question its value and morality now. But President Bush still holds the view that the Central Intelligence Agency and military interrogators shouldn't have their hands completely tied when it comes to suspected terrorists who may harm the U.S.
NEWS
December 21, 2007
We know that puff of smoke coming from Vice President Dick Cheney's ceremonial office on Wednesday couldn't have been from the destruction of more CIA videotapes, because it turned out that even David S. Addington, his fearsome chief of staff, had counseled the spy agency three years ago to be cautious about destroying the tapes it had. When the man known as "Cheney's Cheney" is concerned about sticking to the law, you have to wonder who at the CIA thought...
NEWS
April 28, 2009
Tough tactics help stop attacks I imagine liberal Democrats and terrorists are sleeping more easily now that the new commander in chief has banned the use of waterboarding during interrogation of captured terrorists. Never mind that some at the CIA have said using "enhanced techniques" of interrogation, including waterboarding, on al-Qaida leader Khalid Sheik Mohammed led to his revealing information that helped thwart a planned 9/11-style attack on Los Angeles. But according to President Barack Obama's way of thinking, it's more important to reach out to our Islamic enemies than to protect our own citizens.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | November 5, 2007
ATLANTA -- Does it matter what the rest of the world thinks of the United States? Does it matter that our recent foreign policy has frayed alliances and created enemies? Since we remain the world's only superpower, with the biggest and best military, should we care about our reputation? Yes, we should. Despite what Vice President Dick Cheney and neocon Norman Podhoretz think, we can't shoot and bomb our way out of this war. While military force is sometimes an appropriate response to terrorists, the U.S. also needs to cultivate friends and admirers.
NEWS
May 8, 2011
Regarding your editorial arguing that renewed interest in water-boarding after the killing of Osama bin Laden is misplaced because it simply does not work and reflects poorly on the values of our nation ("Tortured arguments, revisited," May 5), I completely reject your reasoning. The record regarding the interrogation of 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheik Mohammed is clear. Initially, intelligence officers used traditional questioning techniques to gain information, and predictably, KSM remained defiant, silent and unhelpful.
NEWS
May 7, 2011
So let me get this straight, President Obama, the liberals and/or Democrats are against water-boarding, but not against shooting bullets into the head of, and murdering, an unarmed Osama bin Laden while his children were in his house. Just think what would of been accomplished if we instead had taken bin Laden in handcuffs away to the Guantanamo Bay detention camp, water-boarded him and shot him full of truth serum. After we got all the great information, we could have a military tribunal find him guilty and then execute him. Now that would have been justice and Americans would have been proud instead of feeling the shame brought against us by our kill-happy president.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | December 16, 2010
Liberty exists only in the brief time between the fall of one tyranny and the rise of another. The nation's founders understood this explicitly. That's why they constructed the system they did, under which the three branches of government would check and balance each other. The idea was to prolong the life of the Republic for a longer time than would naturally be the case. The Civil War left more than 600,000 Americans dead, along with the then-popular notion that states which had voluntarily joined a union could decide to withdraw from it. Ever since, except for brief periods during which an emerging America stopped to catch its breath, the path toward ever more powerful consolidated government has been trod rather swiftly.
NEWS
May 13, 2009
There's nothing un-funnier than Saturday night's jokes reviewed by the caffeinated light of Monday morning. Which is why we probably shouldn't quarterback a comedian over coffee when she was performing for a crowd primed on cocktails. That reasonable rule seems not to apply, however, when the venue is the White House Correspondents' Association dinner and one of the revelers happens to be the president of the United States. Whether he laughs, smiles or frowns carries political freight far beyond the moment.
NEWS
April 28, 2009
Tough tactics help stop attacks I imagine liberal Democrats and terrorists are sleeping more easily now that the new commander in chief has banned the use of waterboarding during interrogation of captured terrorists. Never mind that some at the CIA have said using "enhanced techniques" of interrogation, including waterboarding, on al-Qaida leader Khalid Sheik Mohammed led to his revealing information that helped thwart a planned 9/11-style attack on Los Angeles. But according to President Barack Obama's way of thinking, it's more important to reach out to our Islamic enemies than to protect our own citizens.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 23, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department revealed yesterday that its internal ethics office was investigating the department's legal approval for waterboarding of al-Qaida suspects by the Central Intelligence Agency and was likely to make public an unclassified version of its report. The disclosure by H. Marshall Jarrett, the head of the department's Office of Professional Responsibility, was the first official acknowledgment of an internal review into the department opinions since 2002 that authorized waterboarding and other harsh interrogation methods.
NEWS
February 9, 2008
Stooping to torture won't conquer terror This week, CIA Director Michael V. Hayden publicly admitted that the agency has used waterboarding as an interrogation technique ("CIA admits using waterboarding," Feb. 6). At least General Hayden's candor is appreciated. President Bush, on the other hand, has said that we don't torture. So much for his candor. And just when was it that we descended to the point where we use methods we previously condemned as despicable and barbaric when they were used by our adversaries?
NEWS
May 13, 2009
There's nothing un-funnier than Saturday night's jokes reviewed by the caffeinated light of Monday morning. Which is why we probably shouldn't quarterback a comedian over coffee when she was performing for a crowd primed on cocktails. That reasonable rule seems not to apply, however, when the venue is the White House Correspondents' Association dinner and one of the revelers happens to be the president of the United States. Whether he laughs, smiles or frowns carries political freight far beyond the moment.
NEWS
February 19, 2008
Waterboarding is torture, and torture is not consistent with what we believe in as a nation, regardless of the circumstance. Prosecutors at the Nazi war trials at Nuremberg knew it more than 50 years ago, and many senior intelligence and military officials question its value and morality now. But President Bush still holds the view that the Central Intelligence Agency and military interrogators shouldn't have their hands completely tied when it comes to suspected terrorists who may harm the U.S.
NEWS
February 9, 2008
Stooping to torture won't conquer terror This week, CIA Director Michael V. Hayden publicly admitted that the agency has used waterboarding as an interrogation technique ("CIA admits using waterboarding," Feb. 6). At least General Hayden's candor is appreciated. President Bush, on the other hand, has said that we don't torture. So much for his candor. And just when was it that we descended to the point where we use methods we previously condemned as despicable and barbaric when they were used by our adversaries?
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.