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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
If you drive downtown on the Jones Falls Expressway, you might have noticed a new billboard just south of Orleans Street featuring a blurry image of George Washington and the word “DRUNK” in big bold letters. No, it's not a leftover attack ad from the 1789 presidential campaign. It's a promotion for the second season of “Drunk History,” the off-kilter Comedy Central hit created by Lutherville native Derek Waters. Season 2 of the woozy walk through our national past starts Tuesday night at 10 and includes an episode on July 22 set in and featuring three stories from 19th-century Baltimore - one each with Edgar Allan Poe, Francis Scott Key and Abraham Lincoln.
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FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
It's one of those scenarios that would be hard to believe in a movie.  As John Waters embarked on the cross-country hitchhiking trip that is memorialized in his recently published book, "Carsick," a 20-year-old Tea Party-affiliated legislator from Frederick County offered him a ride.  And, to make it all the more cinematic, the Bible-thumping college student and the "Pope of Trash" hit it off.  " We don't see eye to eye on a lot of...
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
Fecal matter, it's enough to make you wonder whether you'll ever want to jump in the water again. But it's summer after all, and what's summer without a dip in the bay or a spin on the water skis. Now there's a way to know how much fecal bacteria is in your chosen body of water. The Maryland Department of the Environment posts swimming advisories on an interactive online map at marylandhealthybeaches.com. Beaches closed because of high bacteria readings are shown with red markers; safe beaches are shown in blue.
NEWS
June 23, 2014
The presence of the private water industry at this week's United States Conference of Mayors meeting threatens public health and democracy in Baltimore. Time and time again, experiences in other cities that have privatized their water systems have demonstrated that privatization fails to provide secure and equitable water access to residents. The industry's strategy of placing profits over the human right to water is reprehensible and undermines the democratic system. As a voter and someone who calls Baltimore my home, I strongly urge Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake to take a stand at the USCM and keep the private water industry out of our city.
NEWS
June 22, 2014
This spring, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency took some long-overdue steps to fix the Clean Water Act, ending confusion over which streams and wetlands are protected by the law. Loopholes in the law created over the past decade have left more the half the stream miles in the U.S. and drinking water sources for 100 percent of Baltimore City residents at risk from pollution and development. Polluters and their allies in Congress are fighting tooth and nail to block the EPA from taking this common sense step to protect clean water.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
WASHINGTON -- Environmental advocates say a spending bill set for review in the Senate Appropriations Committee could reopen a fight over whether the Environmental Protection Agency may regulate pollution entering small headwater streams that feed into larger bodies of water, including the Chesapeake Bay. The Obama administration proposed regulations in March that would allow the EPA to enforce Clean Water Act provisions on nearly two million miles...
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
State and federal officials joined a Chesapeake Bay nonprofit Thursday in announcing the award of more than $3.7 million to 34 organizations to reduce storm-water pollution in Maryland and three neighboring states and the District of Columbia. Nine of the grants totaling more than $1 million went toward planting trees, removing pavement and other greening projects in Baltimore city, while two smaller grants targeted plantings in Baltimore County. Shawn Garvin, Mid-Atlantic regional administrator for the Environmental Protection Agency, whose agency provided some of the funds, said investing in such "green infrastructure" to soak up rainfall is "critically important to restoring local waters and the Chesapeake Bay. " Storm-water runoff is a significant and growing source of pollution fouling the bay, but controlling it in dense, older communities is challenging and costly.
NEWS
By Chris Wood | June 18, 2014
On Monday, the Chesapeake Executive Council signed the Chesapeake Watershed Agreement, a collaborative effort across multiple states to protect and restore the Chesapeake Bay. But the celebration of the watershed agreement may be premature. Down the road in Congress there is an effort under way to strip the protections of the Clean Water Act from small headwater streams that feed the bay with cold, clean water. The federal government recently proposed a rule to clarify a politically charged Supreme Court ruling which undermined 30 years of protection of the Clean Water Act for small headwater streams.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
The body of an 11-year-old girl who went missing while playing on a sandbar Friday was found in waters off Cobb Island in southern Maryland on Sunday, according to the St. Mary's County Sheriff's Office. The girl was identified as Faith Janee Lee, of Chaptico, the sheriff's office said. He family has been notified. The body was taken to the office of the chief medical examiner for autopsy, officials said. Foul play is not suspected. About 2 p.m. Sunday, a boater on the Wicomico River near Cobb Island saw a body in the water near the 17400 block of Rock Point Road and called police, said Diane Richardson, a spokeswoman with the Charles County Sheriff's Office.
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