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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2014
Baltimore is featured on the July 22 episode of "Drunk History" on Comedy Central, with Lutherville native Derek Waters and company re-enacting stories from the lives of  Edgar Allan Poe, Francis Scott Key and Abraham Lincoln. The episode, which includes portions filmed at Mother's Federal Hill Grille, is at its off-the-wall best in the Poe segment. Here's some of what I wrote about the episode, and an interview I did with Waters when he filmed in Baltimore. “I didn't choose Baltimore just because it's my hometown,” Waters said during an interview in January when he and his crew were here to film part of the episode in a jam-packed, loud and extra-boozy Mother's Federal Hill Grille.
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BUSINESS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
The concrete oozed rather than poured out of the mixer truck, almost as if reluctant to cover the ground - partly because it won't, entirely. Laborers shoveled pebbly gobs around to form a new sidewalk at a park-and-ride lot in Waysons Corner, one of two where the State Highway Administration is laying "pervious" concrete this summer as a test of its environmental friendliness. Porous paving surfaces have been around for decades, but they're expensive and often didn't work well.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2014
The voice of the water taxi operator off Canton came over the radio Wednesday morning. "We're taking on water," he said. "I think sinking or capsizing is imminent. " Emergency responders listening to their radios at a nearby pier immediately shifted into gear, readying themselves for the start of a mock exercise rescuing dozens of overboard victims in the Inner Harbor. The energy was apparent, if somewhat awkward. "You want to try to do good on these things," said Skip Minter, a longtime boat pilot for the Baltimore Fire Department, whose job was to maneuver out to the training scene — dozens of life jackets strewn about in the water — and return the "victims" back to shore.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Emergency personnel will converge on Inner Harbor waters near Canton on Wednesday as part of a staged water taxi disaster, an event geared toward assessing rescue capabilities and practicing response techniques. Between 8 a.m. and noon, first responders from various federal, state and local agencies will be rescuing flotation devices and "dummies" representing casualties or adrift taxi passengers in water near the 3200 block of Boston St., the Mayor's Office of Emergency Management said.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Three people have died in Maryland waters in as many days, and a U.S. Coast Guard search is underway for another who went missing Monday, authorities said. The bodies of two boaters were found after their vessel encountered storms Sunday into Monday. After the body of Brigette Marchand, 42, of Annapolis, was found in the water off Brandon Shores on Monday, police initiated a search for her partner. Around 11:15 a.m. Tuesday near Fort Howard in Baltimore County, Natural Resources Police found the body of David Frandzen, 40, of Pasadena.
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
The Maryland Department of Natural Resources has imposed new rules and regulations on water jet pack businesses in Ocean City to keep thrill-seekers safe. The jet packs - which propel pressurized streams of water to lift riders up to 30 feet above the water's surface - left Ocean City police officers "unsure of how to handle them and what to do" after they were introduced last summer, said Julie Brown, a boating education coordinator with the Maryland Natural Resources Police.
NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
The Dreambuilder was making slow progress. The 35-foot-long sailboat meandered in the waters off Annapolis on Wednesday as its teenage crew stood on deck and watched in dismay. “I don't think I've ever gone so fast,” Tommy Pipher, 16, said dryly from the helm. “I think the rudder's broken,” said Ellie Wood, 16. Pipher and Wood, rising juniors at South River High School in Edgewater, are part of a group of 13 students who have been learning the ins and outs of sailing and navigation over two weeks at the National Sailing Hall of Fame, a sailing education nonprofit in Annapolis.
NEWS
July 3, 2014
The Maryland and Delaware Atlantic Ocean beach resorts got a bit of good news to kick off the summer season this past week. The latest survey by the National Resources Defense Council rates both states as having some of the cleanest beach water in the country. Based on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water quality standards for swimmer safety (and the prevalence of disease-causing bacteria or viruses), Maryland had the fourth safest coastal beaches in the country. Delaware was the best overall.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Jennifer Etheridge has more than a city view from her 12th-floor condo at 414 Water St. She is in the heart of downtown Baltimore's business district - any more of a cosmopolitan feel would have her perched on top of City Hall, whose dome she sees from her bedroom window. "This place also overlooks the Hustler Club, which is a great conversation starter," she said jokingly. Among the many perks of living in the 31-story building - including round-the-clock front desk service, a fitness center, outdoor pool, business center and multipurpose room - is that she can walk to M&T Bank each morning, where she works as a treasury management consultant.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Baltimore's low-income residents and seniors will receive more money off their water bills, under increases to assistance programs Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced Wednesday. The mayor said low-income residents who qualify will receive $161 off their annual bills. Seniors who have a household income of less than $25,000 annually will have their quarterly bills discounted by 39 percent, up from a 35 percent break. Rawlings-Blake said she wants to help vulnerable residents cope with increases to the city's water and sewer rate — which are set to go up 42 percent over a three-year period to help Baltimore pay to fix its aging infrastructure.
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