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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
The Baltimore City Department of Transportation reported that a water main break at northbound Fulton Avenue has closed the road from Baltimore Street to Lexington Avenue at 7:52 a.m. on Tuesday. Department of Public Works officials are on location, DOT said. Northbound traffic on MD 103 North in Ellicott City is closed past Waterloo Road due to a utility problem at 6:55 a.m., according to the state Department of Transportation. And DOT reported that emergency roadwork on Interstate 97 North in Anne Arundel County at Hawkins Road that began on Sunday continued on Tuesday.
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NEWS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Water restrictions remain in place at the Hanover Square Apartments in Otterbein, where one resident was diagnosed with Legionnaires' disease in mid-July, according to the city's Health Department. The July 18 case is the only one associated with the 1 West Conway Street tower, where the city is monitoring efforts to test and clear the water, said Health Department spokesman Michael Schwartzberg. He said he did not have more information about the patient's status. Legionnaires' disease, a type of pneumonia, spreads through the inhalation of tiny droplets of contaminated water.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Derek Waters, a Lutherville native, is the mind behind Comedy Central's hit show "Drunk History," and presumably tapped into his own sports background to get ready for this week's Sports Heroes episode. The online outtakes for the episode include a clip of Waters training with Ravens outside linebacker Terrell Suggs, and Suggs did what Suggs is known to do. He made me laugh. In the video, Suggs tells Waters that swagger is the most important thing in football, and being tall and dark-skinned would help him with that.
NEWS
August 27, 2014
The misinformation in Susan Shaw's letter ( "State should clean up its act Aug. 22) compelled me to write this. She says don't blame commercial real estate for overflows because they don't overflow. She goes on to say the overflows were the state's fault. Actually, the overflows are Baltimore City's fault since its operates the wastewater treatment system where the overflows occurred. But even blaming the city is off the mark. Ms. Shaw fails to recognize a central fact. When it comes to water, everything is downstream.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
After shrinking for a while to its smallest size in 30 years, the Chesapeake Bay's "dead zone" has made a late-summer comeback, and that's not good for crabs, fish and oysters. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources reports that the volume of bay water with too little oxygen in it for fish to breathe -- also known as the "dead zone" -- rebounded in early August to its 8th largest size.  In early July, the zone had dipped to a record-low volume in early July, a shift scientists attributed to Hurricane Arthur stirring the bay's waters as the storm passed by Maryland on its way up the Atlantic coast.  With the dead zone back to above-average, the volume of low-oxygen water in the main bay was estimated last week to be 1.32 cubic miles.  That's about what government and University of Maryland scientists had predicted early in the summer, based on high river flows resulting from a wetter spring this year than in 2013.  Heavy rains and snow melt tend to wash more nitrogen and phosphorus off the land into the water, where the plant nutrients stimulate algae blooms, followed by a dip in oxygen levels in the bay's depths.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
Police confirmed a body recovered from waters near M&T Bank Stadium was that of a 21-year-old man reported missing from southern Baltimore last week. The body of Vashon Christopher was found in the water off of the 300 block of Stockholm St. on Monday afternoon, police said. Images circulated on Facebook said Christopher had been last seen on Aug. 10 around Westport, and police said he had been formally reported missing on Aug. 15. Police did not release any details about whether investigators observed trauma or suspect foul play.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2014
A man was found dead in the water near the Baltimore Animal Rescue and Care Shelter in the city's Carroll-Camden Industrial Area Monday afternoon, police said. Police and fire department personnel pulled the body from the harbor at about 3:20 p.m. near the 300 block of Stockholm Street, police said. The man has not been identified, and the cause of his death is pending an autopsy by the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. cmcampbell@baltsun.com twitter.com/cmcampbell6
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
A portion of Smith Avenue in Baltimore County was closed and nearby residents lost water service following a water main break Friday, a Baltimore City Department of Public Works spokesman said. The 16-inch main broke at Smith Avenue at Deancroft Road, cutting off water to a 90-unit apartment complex, DPW spokesman Kurt Kocher said. Crew were attempting to fix the main Friday but it was not clear how long the repair would take, he said.
NEWS
August 14, 2014
If Baltimore were actually considering privatizing its water system, the 50 or so people who were protesting outside City Hall on Wednesday would have had a strong case to be upset. But it's not. Rather, Baltimore is looking for a consultant to evaluate the operation and maintenance of its aging system to find ways to increase efficiency - something that should be greatly in the public interest at a time when rates are constantly going up and broken water mains are distressingly common.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
About 50 protesters rallied Wednesday outside Baltimore City Hall to object to a proposed study of the water system, a step they fear could eventually put the system in private hands. The group, led by labor organizers and the nonprofit Corporate Accountability International, is worried that a $500,000 consultant's study could lead to the private management of the water system. But the Department of Public Works request for proposals did not involve privatization, city officials said.
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