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NEWS
August 22, 2002
Anne Arundel County residents whose water wells have run dry can stop at 20 of the county's 29 fire stations for assistance. People should bring containers suitable for drinking water and ask firefighters at the stations for assistance. The stations are staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week. In South County, residents can obtain drinking water from either Station 3 at 3123 Riva Road in Riva or at Station 40 at 121 Jennifer Road in West Annapolis. Other fire stations in South County operate on wells and are receiving bottled water.
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NEWS
October 7, 2014
The development of natural gas supplies located deep in the rocky landscape of Western Maryland carries significant environmental risks, but there are regulations the state can impose that would reduce those dangers. The latest study of this issue - a draft report released last Friday by Maryland's Department of the Environment and Department of Natural Resources - takes a somewhat optimistic view of that circumstance, but isn't exactly a game-changer. The assessment looked at the various phases of the fracking process, from site preparation and drilling to production and finally, reclamation, and rated the potential risks involved from low to high.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1997
The state has blocked a Kent County farmer's plan to raise 3,000 hogs in a warehouse by the headwaters of the Chester River, averting for now a controversy over the environmental impact of so-called "factory" farming.The Maryland Department of the Environment has rejected an application by Anthony Guessregen for a ground-water discharge permit to apply liquefied hog waste on the 313-acre Willow Pond Farm near Millington. He had planned to excavate two lagoons to store up to 15 million gallons of diluted hog waste.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Maryland regulators are weighing some of the strictest limits in the country on shale gas drilling, but a scientist Monday suggested they still may not go far enough to protect drinking water wells from contamination by methane leaking from drilling sites. Gas drilling rigs would generally have to be at least 2,000 feet from public or private water wells under rules being considered by the Maryland Department of the Environment, officials said Monday during a meeting of the governor's advisory commission on the issue.
NEWS
By Valerie Twanmoh and Roman E. Ratych | September 28, 2004
FROM THE OUTSET, children are taught a simple but important lesson: If you make a mess, you clean it up. Unfortunately, the oil and chemical companies that produce, use and distribute MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether), a toxic gasoline additive, have forgotten this basic lesson. These companies not only refuse to clean up the MTBE contamination that is polluting water around the country, but also are lobbying for passage of the federal energy bill which will let them off the hook for the cleanup costs.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2003
Soil and ground-water sampling has turned up disturbing results in a boundary area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, where the hazardous chemical perchlorate has leached into Aberdeen's drinking water supplies. Perchlorate, a rocket fuel additive used also in explosive devices such as grenades, has been found in patchy concentrations thousands of times higher than in previous discoveries - but not in the immediate area of the city's 11 wells - raising new questions about the unregulated contaminant and how it may be spreading.
NEWS
April 13, 2008
Anne Arundel County probably has won a reprieve from major budget cuts, thanks to some of the local bills that passed the General Assembly in its final days. Gov. Martin O'Malley is expected to sign legislation that will save the county Health Department $573,000 in inspection fees during the next fiscal year and reimburse it $104,000 for inspections last year, according to county officials. Most of the savings comes from passing on the costs to restaurants, food processing plants and residents who drill water wells.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | June 14, 1992
The federal Environmental Protection Agency plans tests on water wells at the Perryman field, which supply half of the drinking water used by Harford's 24,000 water customers, to help the county determine the source of contaminants found in two wells.In addition, the County Council voted last week to delay spending $200,000 to drill a new well at Perryman until geological tests have been completed in the area. Those tests have not been scheduled because the council must approve money to pay for them.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2002
One of Aberdeen's drinking water wells was shut down yesterday after perchlorate, a hazardous industrial chemical, was found in a sample taken from the well, said city and Aberdeen Proving Ground officials. The discovery was unwelcome news for the proving ground, which has been working aggressively to pinpoint the source of the contamination, discovered about a month ago in ground-water samples taken about 300 feet from one of the city's 11 wells along the post boundary. "We no longer have breathing room," said George Mercer, proving ground spokesman.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2003
Soil and groundwater sampling has turned up disturbing results in a boundary area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, where the hazardous chemical perchlorate has leached into the city of Aberdeen's drinking water supplies. Perchlorate, a rocket fuel additive used also in explosive devices such as grenades, has been found in patchy concentrations thousands of times higher than in previous discoveries - but not in the immediate area of the city's 11 wells - raising new questions about the unregulated contaminant and how it may be spreading.
NEWS
April 13, 2008
Anne Arundel County probably has won a reprieve from major budget cuts, thanks to some of the local bills that passed the General Assembly in its final days. Gov. Martin O'Malley is expected to sign legislation that will save the county Health Department $573,000 in inspection fees during the next fiscal year and reimburse it $104,000 for inspections last year, according to county officials. Most of the savings comes from passing on the costs to restaurants, food processing plants and residents who drill water wells.
NEWS
By NICK SHIELDS and NICK SHIELDS,SUN REPORTER | February 22, 2006
State environmental officials are overseeing the cleanup of thousands of gallons of gasoline that they say leaked from a service station in the Jacksonville area of Baltimore County. About 25,000 gallons of gasoline leaked from a regular unleaded gasoline line at an Exxon station near the intersection of Jarrettsville Pike and Paper Mill and Sweet Air roads, Maryland Department of the Environment officials said. The station has been closed since MDE officials learned of the leak on Friday.
NEWS
By Valerie Twanmoh and Roman E. Ratych | September 28, 2004
FROM THE OUTSET, children are taught a simple but important lesson: If you make a mess, you clean it up. Unfortunately, the oil and chemical companies that produce, use and distribute MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether), a toxic gasoline additive, have forgotten this basic lesson. These companies not only refuse to clean up the MTBE contamination that is polluting water around the country, but also are lobbying for passage of the federal energy bill which will let them off the hook for the cleanup costs.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2003
Soil and groundwater sampling has turned up disturbing results in a boundary area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, where the hazardous chemical perchlorate has leached into the city of Aberdeen's drinking water supplies. Perchlorate, a rocket fuel additive used also in explosive devices such as grenades, has been found in patchy concentrations thousands of times higher than in previous discoveries - but not in the immediate area of the city's 11 wells - raising new questions about the unregulated contaminant and how it may be spreading.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2003
Soil and ground-water sampling has turned up disturbing results in a boundary area of Aberdeen Proving Ground, where the hazardous chemical perchlorate has leached into Aberdeen's drinking water supplies. Perchlorate, a rocket fuel additive used also in explosive devices such as grenades, has been found in patchy concentrations thousands of times higher than in previous discoveries - but not in the immediate area of the city's 11 wells - raising new questions about the unregulated contaminant and how it may be spreading.
NEWS
August 22, 2002
Anne Arundel County residents whose water wells have run dry can stop at 20 of the county's 29 fire stations for assistance. People should bring containers suitable for drinking water and ask firefighters at the stations for assistance. The stations are staffed 24 hours a day, seven days a week. In South County, residents can obtain drinking water from either Station 3 at 3123 Riva Road in Riva or at Station 40 at 121 Jennifer Road in West Annapolis. Other fire stations in South County operate on wells and are receiving bottled water.
NEWS
October 7, 2014
The development of natural gas supplies located deep in the rocky landscape of Western Maryland carries significant environmental risks, but there are regulations the state can impose that would reduce those dangers. The latest study of this issue - a draft report released last Friday by Maryland's Department of the Environment and Department of Natural Resources - takes a somewhat optimistic view of that circumstance, but isn't exactly a game-changer. The assessment looked at the various phases of the fracking process, from site preparation and drilling to production and finally, reclamation, and rated the potential risks involved from low to high.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
Maryland regulators are weighing some of the strictest limits in the country on shale gas drilling, but a scientist Monday suggested they still may not go far enough to protect drinking water wells from contamination by methane leaking from drilling sites. Gas drilling rigs would generally have to be at least 2,000 feet from public or private water wells under rules being considered by the Maryland Department of the Environment, officials said Monday during a meeting of the governor's advisory commission on the issue.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2002
Traces of a hazardous chemical have turned up in three wells that provide drinking water to the city of Aberdeen, test results released yesterday by Aberdeen Proving Ground show. In June, perchlorate was detected in one of 11 city wells around the base's perimeter. The chemical did not reappear in that well when water was tested July 23, but it was detected in three others, said Pat McClung, APG spokeswoman. City Manager Peter A. Dacey said "there's no need for alarm," because the perchlorate appeared at low levels - between 1.2 and 1.7 parts per billion.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2002
One of Aberdeen's drinking water wells was shut down yesterday after perchlorate, a hazardous industrial chemical, was found in a sample taken from the well, said city and Aberdeen Proving Ground officials. The discovery was unwelcome news for the proving ground, which has been working aggressively to pinpoint the source of the contamination, discovered about a month ago in ground-water samples taken about 300 feet from one of the city's 11 wells along the post boundary. "We no longer have breathing room," said George Mercer, proving ground spokesman.
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