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NEWS
November 29, 2006
The pressure's really on now. Queen Elizabeth II has agreed to serve as one of the star attractions of Jamestown's 400th anniversary celebration next May, but Congress is still foot-dragging on the preparations. Legislation granting a national historic designation to John Smith's 2,300-mile route of exploration from the fledgling settlement throughout the Chesapeake Bay region still needs a final nod of approval from lame-duck lawmakers. If they don't get around to it before they adjourn next month, the legislative process will have to begin anew next year - almost certainly too late even for the first of the trail markers to be in place in time for the festivities.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
"Monocacy" is an Americanized version of the Shawnee word "Monnockkesy," which means "river of many bends," and the Monocacy River lives up to its name. Though my kayak glides calmly under my kayak through the opaque green water, I struggle to keep up with my guide, Andy Lett, recreation supervisor for the Frederick County Department of Parks and Recreation. Whenever I get the hang of things, dipping one oar and then another to propel myself in a relatively straight line, another curve arrives to confuse me, and I have to stop to change direction so I don't paddle right into the riverbank.
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NEWS
September 20, 2006
Barely eight months remain before the 400th anniversary of the founding of Jamestown will be marked with a re-enactment of John Smith's exploratory voyages through the Chesapeake Bay region. Yet planning and promotion for the event have been held up because Congress hasn't enacted legislation designating Captain Smith's 2,300-mile route a National Historic Trail. With a record of achievement that's otherwise looking mighty thin, the cantankerous 109th Congress ought to grab this low-hanging fruit before it's too late.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 16, 2012
The 3,000-mile water and land trail network created to relive the Chesapeake Bay's 17th century exploration by English colonists is about to grow still larger. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar and National Park Service Director Jon Jarvis are slated to visit Sandy Point State Park in Annapolis this afternoon to celebrate the addition of four new river river trails to the existing Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail .  The federal officials are to be joined by Gov.Martin O'Malley, local officials, Native American tribal leaders and conservation group representatives.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | February 20, 2005
Bad news: When it comes to wide-open spaces, Maryland is not a large state. Good news: With the Chesapeake Bay and hundreds of rivers and streams, it is a wet one. Looking to capitalize on those liquid assets, Sen. Paul Sarbanes and three of his colleagues last week asked the National Park Service to see about turning the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries into a first-of-its-kind paddling trail. The John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Watertrail would honor the explorer's role in founding Jamestown, Va., and mapping the Chesapeake Bay. It would be similar to 13 established land-based paths such as the Lewis and Clark and Pony Express trails.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2010
A stretch of Susquehanna River and Chesapeake Bay waterfront between Harford and Cecil counties could be among the first areas to win federal funding for the construction of "water trails. " The National Park Service has identified the Lower Susquehanna Heritage Greenway as a priority segment of what will be the first combined land and water trail in America. The national designation will help the non-profit group that runs the heritage area to secure federal funding for its plan to link existing trails along the Susquehanna River and build more, ultimately into a 40-mile network of waterside walkways through the two counties.
NEWS
By Andrew G. Sherwood and Andrew G. Sherwood,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2005
After a miserable first summer at the Jamestown colony in Virginia, Capt. John Smith and 12 colonists set off in 1608 on a journey that would take them the length of the Chesapeake Bay. Beginning near Cape Henry and sailing 180 miles north to the Susquehanna Flats between Harford and Cecil counties, the group was searching for a northwest passage to the Pacific, hoping to find gold and develop trade with the Indians. Smith's route might become the site of the nation's first national water trail and part of the National Historic Trails system.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2003
IT'S often said, and true, that even the best efforts to repair Chesapeake Bay can never restore the place as it was when Capt. John Smith first explored and charted it in 1607. Indeed, Smith's words, "Heaven and earth never agreed better to frame a place for man's habitation," have come almost to haunt us. Human inhabitation of the bay's six-state watershed grew to about 8 million between 1607 and 1950, then nearly doubled, to 15.7 million during the past 50 years. About a million more each decade are projected to swell the ranks.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 16, 2012
The 3,000-mile water and land trail network created to relive the Chesapeake Bay's 17th century exploration by English colonists is about to grow still larger. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar and National Park Service Director Jon Jarvis are slated to visit Sandy Point State Park in Annapolis this afternoon to celebrate the addition of four new river river trails to the existing Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail .  The federal officials are to be joined by Gov.Martin O'Malley, local officials, Native American tribal leaders and conservation group representatives.
NEWS
January 15, 2007
MARYLAND Probe could limit hiring When Democrat Martin O'Malley takes office as governor Wednesday, the scope of his patronage hiring could be hindered by the legislature's year-long investigation into the personnel practices of his Republican predecessor. pg 1a Water trail eagerly awaited Some Chesapeake Bay towns are hoping to capitalize on the newly created Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Water Trail to attract more tourists. The first national water trail traces the explorer's voyages 400 year ago from Jamestown, Va., to the mouth of the Susquehanna River.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2010
A stretch of Susquehanna River and Chesapeake Bay waterfront between Harford and Cecil counties could be among the first areas to win federal funding for the construction of "water trails. " The National Park Service has identified the Lower Susquehanna Heritage Greenway as a priority segment of what will be the first combined land and water trail in America. The national designation will help the non-profit group that runs the heritage area to secure federal funding for its plan to link existing trails along the Susquehanna River and build more, ultimately into a 40-mile network of waterside walkways through the two counties.
NEWS
September 14, 2008
Police teach trash security importance The Annapolis Police Department will present a program, "Trash Intelligence," at 7 p.m. Thursday at Heritage Baptist Church, 1740 Forest Drive, Annapolis. Billy Davis, operations security program manager for the Defense Information Systems Agency, a joint Department of Defense agency, will show residents how their trash can be used against them. He will describe how criminals can go through trash containers looking for personal information and interests.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | August 10, 2008
Capt. John Smith survived hostile fire 400 years ago during his daring explorations of the Chesapeake Bay. The buoy that bobbed at the mouth of the Patapsco River as part of a historic water trail bearing Smith's name to provide anglers and boaters with valuable information hasn't fared nearly as well. Thursday, the bullet-riddled marker was pulled from the water and put in the repair shop. The Natural Resources Police have opened a tip line as they investigate the damaging of a piece of federal property.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | July 27, 2007
The Chesapeake Bay of 400 years ago and the present crossed paths yesterday morning at the mouth of the Patapsco River, when a replica of Capt. John Smith's boat passed by where a bobbing transmitter will tell the story of the explorer and the water around it. The wooden shallop, powered by oar and sail, was on its way to Baltimore, 76 days into its own summer-long Chesapeake voyage of discovery and tribute to Smith's exploits. Bright yellow and powered by the sun, the "smart buoy" has instruments to help scientists monitor the health of the bay, aid navigation and act as an electronic tour guide for a new national park.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,Sun Reporter | June 3, 2007
VIENNA -- For Mayor Russell Brinsfield and Chief Sewell Fitzhugh, the event yesterday was more than a celebration of the history of this little village along the Nanticoke River. If things go as the pair plans, the daylong commemoration of Capt. John Smith's 1,500-mile trek around the bay in 1608 could be a first step toward making Vienna a tourist stop along the National Park Service's first water trail. "We're looking for ways to make the town a destination," Brinsfield said. "We don't want our town turning into some huge tourist thing, but we're testing the waters to see what's possible in terms of some sort of historical and environmental center, something that would include a Native American heritage center.
NEWS
January 15, 2007
MARYLAND Probe could limit hiring When Democrat Martin O'Malley takes office as governor Wednesday, the scope of his patronage hiring could be hindered by the legislature's year-long investigation into the personnel practices of his Republican predecessor. pg 1a Water trail eagerly awaited Some Chesapeake Bay towns are hoping to capitalize on the newly created Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Water Trail to attract more tourists. The first national water trail traces the explorer's voyages 400 year ago from Jamestown, Va., to the mouth of the Susquehanna River.
TRAVEL
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
"Monocacy" is an Americanized version of the Shawnee word "Monnockkesy," which means "river of many bends," and the Monocacy River lives up to its name. Though my kayak glides calmly under my kayak through the opaque green water, I struggle to keep up with my guide, Andy Lett, recreation supervisor for the Frederick County Department of Parks and Recreation. Whenever I get the hang of things, dipping one oar and then another to propel myself in a relatively straight line, another curve arrives to confuse me, and I have to stop to change direction so I don't paddle right into the riverbank.
NEWS
September 14, 2008
Police teach trash security importance The Annapolis Police Department will present a program, "Trash Intelligence," at 7 p.m. Thursday at Heritage Baptist Church, 1740 Forest Drive, Annapolis. Billy Davis, operations security program manager for the Defense Information Systems Agency, a joint Department of Defense agency, will show residents how their trash can be used against them. He will describe how criminals can go through trash containers looking for personal information and interests.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | January 15, 2007
VIENNA -- John Smith slept here. Or somewhere near this Nanticoke River town, where the wind twists through vast marshes and gulls wail overhead. Never mind that the great Chesapeake Bay explorer's visit was short, or that it occurred 400 years ago. Vienna is banking on the lore of Smith's voyage to bring tourists into this sleepy Eastern Shore hamlet a mile off U.S. 50. The town is planning to build a John Smith discovery center along the Nanticoke, an...
NEWS
November 29, 2006
The pressure's really on now. Queen Elizabeth II has agreed to serve as one of the star attractions of Jamestown's 400th anniversary celebration next May, but Congress is still foot-dragging on the preparations. Legislation granting a national historic designation to John Smith's 2,300-mile route of exploration from the fledgling settlement throughout the Chesapeake Bay region still needs a final nod of approval from lame-duck lawmakers. If they don't get around to it before they adjourn next month, the legislative process will have to begin anew next year - almost certainly too late even for the first of the trail markers to be in place in time for the festivities.
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