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BUSINESS
January 16, 2005
A reader is concerned about underground springs that threaten to cause water seeping into her home. She purchased her home in 2001 from the first owner who bought it from the builder two years earlier. During 2001 and 2002, the reader spent $2,900 to correct subpar grading by making sure that surface water drained away from the house. Water problems continued in 2003. After Tropical Storm Isabel, the sump pump ran more frequently. A county water supervisor "told me that several areas where I live have underground springs and they can pop up when the groundwater level gets high," says the reader.
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NEWS
February 3, 2010
Instead of waging a campaign to gut Maryland's storm water regulations ("Storm water regulations would cost jobs," Readers respond, Jan. 26) home builders should embrace common sense approaches to managing storm water runoff. There is nothing radical about low-impact development. Both new and older developments would be more appealing to potential buyers since communities will be more attractive and sustainable with fewer drainage issues. Isn't this a good marketing tool? Developers can even advertise that they are saving the Chesapeake Bay. I am retrofitting my older suburban plot of land to incorporate rain garden(s)
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NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | December 28, 1998
The County Commissioners may sign a contract today that will clear the way for a Wakefield Valley limestone quarry operator to begin joining two existing quarries into a single huge pit that will be 500 feet deep.The commissioners are scheduled to meet with representatives of Lafarge Corp., owner of Redland Genstar Inc., which has sought since 1993 to expand its 42-year-old Medford quarry. The expansion plan won approval from the county Planning and Zoning Commission in 1995, but county government and corporate negotiators have spent three years working out the proposed contract scheduled for discussion today.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 5, 2009
Five weeks after a dry winter dropped Maryland into an official drought and the state's farmers and hydrologists began wringing their hands, it's over. "Right after we put out the press release ... it started raining," said Daniel J. Soeder, a hydrologist with the U.S. Geological Survey. "But hey, if that's what it takes to end a drought, it works for me." After the driest first three months of a year on record for Baltimore, abundant rains in April have now sloshed over into May, he said.
NEWS
February 6, 2000
Low ground water levels delay sewage system tests Ground water levels in Carroll County have caused the Health Department to delay testing of some proposed lots for sewage disposal systems. Maryland sewage disposal and subdivision regulations require certain soil percolation and other tests to be conducted when the highest water table can be expected in the sewage disposal area. Levels usually are at their highest between Feb. 1 and April 30. The Health Department will delay testing in wet weather soils until shallow water table conditions are more normal.
NEWS
February 18, 2001
Health department delays tests for sewage systems Current ground water levels in Carroll County have caused the health department to delay testing of some proposed lots for sewage disposal systems. Maryland Sewage Disposal and Subdivision regulations require soil percolation and other tests to be conducted when the highest water table can be expected in the sewage disposal area. Levels usually are at their highest between Feb. 1 and April 30. Current data show that ground-water levels in wet-weather soils are below normal.
NEWS
January 30, 2000
Carroll Lutheran Village selects 2 new trustees The Carroll Lutheran Village board of trustees recently had elections and welcomed two new members. Re-elected to a second three-year term were: R. Wayne Barnes, president of Barnes-Bollinger Insurance; and Thomas J. Zirpoli, president and chief executive officer of Target Community & Educational Services and a Western Maryland College professor. Newly elected to the board were: Ann H. Deming, former bookkeeper and village resident; Marion Suski, multimedia developer for Bell Atlantic and Friends of the Village vice president; and Arthur Steven Wisner, treasurer/ director of financial services at WMC. Two ex officio board members are the Rev. Eugene Alexander, pastor of Holy Spirit Lutheran Church and dean of the Westminster Conference of the Delaware/Maryland Synod, and William Richards, president of the Resident Association Council of the Village.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1999
A hydrogeologist delivered news yesterday that only schoolchildren would want to hear: Carroll will need several snowy days this winter to get its water supply back to normal."
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1999
The leader of a New Windsor community group is skeptical an agreement between the county and a Wakefield Valley quarry operator will protect underground water supplies in the limestone-rich valley.The agreement, signed last week, gives county approval for Virginia-based Lafarge Corp. to connect two pits at the Medford quarry. The single huge pit will descend 500 feet below ground level. Lafarge acquired the Medford quarry when it bought Redland Genstar, the former quarry owner, in June.The quarry operator pledged to study a technique called grouting to reduce underground water flowing into the pit and possibly curb the incidence of sinkholes that pock the valley's surface.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1999
The leader of a New Windsor community group is skeptical an agreement between the county and a Wakefield Valley quarry operator will protect underground water supplies in the limestone-rich valley.The agreement, signed last week, gives county approval for Virginia-based Lafarge Corp. to connect two pits at the Medford quarry. The single huge pit will descend 500 feet below ground level. Lafarge acquired the Medford quarry when it bought Redland Genstar, the former quarry owner, in June.The quarry operator pledged to study a technique called grouting to reduce underground water flowing into the pit and possibly curb the incidence of sinkholes that pock the valley's surface.
NEWS
By Liza Field | August 11, 2008
The underground water table gets its supply from only one source: the moisture which falls on the surface of the land. - Jay N. "Ding" Darling, cartoonist and conservationist Got rain? Paying $4 per gallon for milk and gas drew our attention this year. It seemed to create a funnel for the reality finally to sink into our awareness: Resources on a finite Earth are limited. It also diverted our attention from a more submerged shortage - of water. This is regrettable, because water is one resource we could renew, if we tried.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2005
A reader is concerned about underground springs that threaten to cause water seeping into her home. She purchased her home in 2001 from the first owner who bought it from the builder two years earlier. During 2001 and 2002, the reader spent $2,900 to correct subpar grading by making sure that surface water drained away from the house. Water problems continued in 2003. After Tropical Storm Isabel, the sump pump ran more frequently. A county water supervisor "told me that several areas where I live have underground springs and they can pop up when the groundwater level gets high," says the reader.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Fesperman | August 15, 2004
Pompeii, by Robert Harris. Random House. 304 pages. $24.95. Robert Harris has made a specialty of ushering readers deep into worlds that they can no longer -- or never could -- visit. In Fatherland, he created a chilling vision of Nazi Germany as it might have existed in the 1960s, had Hitler's army survived the Russian Front. In Enigma, he re-created the claustrophobic pressure cooker of wartime Eng-land's Bletchley Park, where hundreds of cryptographers worked frantically to break Ger-many's military codes.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2003
SOME 20 springs ago, a young, self-taught biologist named Richard Klein led one of those rare field trips that, in a few hours, inspires and informs for the rest of one's life. By a forest brook in Baltimore County, he demonstrated how rainfall, filtered and percolated through the leafy canopy and the deep duff of the forest floor, mostly soaked into the water table -- rather than blasting erosively downstream. In contrast, a hundred times as much of the same rainfall gushed off the paved watershed of our next stop, an urban stream.
NEWS
January 27, 2002
Low water levels delay sewage system testing Current ground water levels in Carroll County have prompted the Health Department to delay testing of proposed sites for sewage disposal systems. Maryland sewage disposal and subdivision regulations require certain soil-percolation and other tests to be conducted when the water table in the sewage disposal area is expected to be at its highest level. Levels usually are at their highest between Feb. 1 and April 30. Current data indicates that ground water levels are below normal.
NEWS
February 18, 2001
Health department delays tests for sewage systems Current ground water levels in Carroll County have caused the health department to delay testing of some proposed lots for sewage disposal systems. Maryland Sewage Disposal and Subdivision regulations require soil percolation and other tests to be conducted when the highest water table can be expected in the sewage disposal area. Levels usually are at their highest between Feb. 1 and April 30. Current data show that ground-water levels in wet-weather soils are below normal.
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