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NEWS
July 29, 2012
It's apparent that there are many problems in Baltimore's water system as managed by the Department of Public Works. The situation in the field is way out of date, and the entire billing system should be computerized. At most other locations in the country, water districts have interior water meters with electronic exterior readouts and have had them for the past 15 to 20 years. This arrangement is accompanied by a shut-off valve on the water service lateral located at the property line at the street.
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NEWS
Sheila Durant | September 14, 2014
Like many Americans, we in Maryland have watched and listened to the graphic daily news stories chronicling Ebola's escalating devastation in Liberia and other West African nations. Our hearts break as we witness the deaths of innocent Liberians and courageous health-care providers. And we wonder: How can one of the world's poorest countries, whose people and infrastructure remain devastated from over a decade of civil war, hold up against the ferocity of the worst Ebola epidemic ever?
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2012
Back in the late 1700s, when Baltimoreans got their water from nearby streams, springs and wells, every household was ordered to keep two leather buckets filled to fight fires. That precaution might come in handy again, as the water main break Monday near the Inner Harbor delivered a disruptive reminder to downtown businesses and commuters of just how decrepit the regional system supplying the vital liquid has become. For years, there have been about 1,000 breaks annually in the 4,500-mile network of underground pipes that carries water to 1.8 million residents in the city and parts of Anne Arundel, Baltimore and Howard counties.
NEWS
August 14, 2014
If Baltimore were actually considering privatizing its water system, the 50 or so people who were protesting outside City Hall on Wednesday would have had a strong case to be upset. But it's not. Rather, Baltimore is looking for a consultant to evaluate the operation and maintenance of its aging system to find ways to increase efficiency - something that should be greatly in the public interest at a time when rates are constantly going up and broken water mains are distressingly common.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
About 50 protesters rallied Wednesday outside Baltimore City Hall to object to a proposed study of the water system, a step they fear could eventually put the system in private hands. The group, led by labor organizers and the nonprofit Corporate Accountability International, is worried that a $500,000 consultant's study could lead to the private management of the water system. But the Department of Public Works request for proposals did not involve privatization, city officials said.
NEWS
July 18, 2012
Another massive water main break in downtown Baltimore has brought to the surface a problem that has been slowly building beneath our feet for decades. Our more than century-old water system routinely leaks millions of gallons into the ground and, with some regularity, experiences spectacular failures that stop traffic, shutter businesses and leave thousands without one of life's necessities. To their credit, some of the city's top officials have been trying to address a problem that is generally out of sight, out of mind.
NEWS
December 30, 2013
In his letter to the editor ( "City water needs a new business plan," Dec. 26), Pete Sepp of the National Taxpayers Union identifies better asset management as a way for Baltimore to better manage its water system and save money. The Asset Management Division in the Bureau of Water and Wastewater is already helping Baltimore water customers get the most from their investment. This division considers the condition of our pipes, as well as the impacts of a possible infrastructure failure on neighborhoods, critical users, and the environment, in selecting how to best use our resources.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
To investigate the possibly of future water rate increases, Baltimore City Council President Bernard C. “Jack” Young on Monday will request a hearing to discuss a request by the Department of Public Works to borrow up to $2 billion. The city is obligated to improve its aging infrastructure under a 2002 agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency and Maryland Department of Environment. To help meet those obligations, the Department of Public Works requested legislation that would authorize an increase in the city's borrowing capacity.
NEWS
March 20, 1991
The county is applying for grants and loans to try to take charge ofthe Pleasant Valley water system.The system, owned by Viola Leister, serves about 50 households, said K. Marlene Conaway, assistant director of the county Planning Department.The county is taking over ownership of the system at the request of residents and Leister, Conaway said.The county is applying forstate and federal grants and loans of about $500,000, said Steven D.Powell, director of management and budget.The county also is looking into whether a central sewer system should be installed in Pleasant Valley, Conaway said.
NEWS
July 23, 1998
Two leaks in Manchester's water system -- releasing about 15,000 gallons a day -- have been discovered by the town's public works crews.The leaks are partly responsible for the town's sudden increase in water use, said Steven L. Miller, director of Manchester's Department of Public Works and Parks. He said his department will patch the leaks and search for others."We think we still have one or maybe two more. If we could find them we'd feel a lot better," he said.Water use during the past three months has risen by 3 million gallons, Miller said.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
About 50 protesters rallied Wednesday outside Baltimore City Hall to object to a proposed study of the water system, a step they fear could eventually put the system in private hands. The group, led by labor organizers and the nonprofit Corporate Accountability International, is worried that a $500,000 consultant's study could lead to the private management of the water system. But the Department of Public Works request for proposals did not involve privatization, city officials said.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
The crisis may have eased in Toledo , but the toxic algae in Lake Erie that contaminated the water supply for 500,000 people in Ohio continues to plague lakes and rivers across the country, including here in Maryland. Lake Williston, a swimming hole for a Girl Scout camp in Caroline County, is off limits this summer because of  dangerous levels of a toxin in its water.  So is 75-acre Lake Needwood in Rock Creek Regional Park in Montgomery County.  Same for Northwest Creek, a 100-acre impoundment on Kent Island in Queen Anne's County.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
To investigate the possibly of future water rate increases, Baltimore City Council President Bernard C. “Jack” Young on Monday will request a hearing to discuss a request by the Department of Public Works to borrow up to $2 billion. The city is obligated to improve its aging infrastructure under a 2002 agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency and Maryland Department of Environment. To help meet those obligations, the Department of Public Works requested legislation that would authorize an increase in the city's borrowing capacity.
HEALTH
By Jessica Anderson and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Two cases of Legionnaires' disease have been confirmed at a senior housing complex in East Baltimore, city health officials said Friday. A pair of residents at the 149-unit Apostolic Towers Apartments at 201 N. Washington St. tested positive for the bacteria that cause Legionnaires', city health officials said. One case occurred in March and the other this week; the residents were hospitalized. One person remains in the hospital with pneumonia. Health officials said two cases are considered a "cluster," leading them to test the water system in the building and warn residents not to shower or use the tap. Bottled water has been provided for drinking and cooking.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | March 4, 2014
Dull though the subject matter may be, it would be hard to overstate the potential impact on Harford County of a consolidated, countywide water and sewer system. Running a municipal water system that meets the demands of large swaths of the populace, and then dealing with the wastewater that goes down the drain, are among the least flashy aspects of government. As a result, unless there's a problem - like the recent one in West Virginia - resulting in large numbers of people being without clean water, or instances where raw sewage fouls a public waterway, municipal water and sewer issues are not the stuff of commonplace political conversation.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2014
I. Morton "Buddy" Schindler, an electrical engineer who oversaw the pumping operation for Baltimore's water supply system, died Friday at Sinai Hospital of complications of a fall he suffered in December. He was 87 and lived in Pikesville. Born in Baltimore and raised near Patterson Park, Mr. Schindler was a 1944 Patterson Park High School graduate. He was awarded a scholarship to the former Western Maryland College, where he studied for several months before being drafted into military service.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | January 18, 1996
Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker and County Councilman Charles C. Feaga agree that residents near a west county trash dump should get some help in hooking up to the county water system.But how much help was debated again at a County Council meeting Tuesday night that drew about 25 citizens concerned about well water near the Alpha Ridge Landfill.The county has spent $10.5 million on a water system in the area, and there have been no verifiable instances of toxic chemicals spreading to the wells.
NEWS
December 30, 2013
In his letter to the editor ( "City water needs a new business plan," Dec. 26), Pete Sepp of the National Taxpayers Union identifies better asset management as a way for Baltimore to better manage its water system and save money. The Asset Management Division in the Bureau of Water and Wastewater is already helping Baltimore water customers get the most from their investment. This division considers the condition of our pipes, as well as the impacts of a possible infrastructure failure on neighborhoods, critical users, and the environment, in selecting how to best use our resources.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
Two politically connected firms are lobbying for a multimillion-dollar contract to overhaul the city's water-meter system - a once-in-a-generation effort Baltimore officials say could help end the chronic problem of wildly erroneous bills. City purchasing officials, who are evaluating the bids, could recommend one of the companies to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake as early as Friday. The winning bidder will have to install more than 400,000 water meters and replace the management system by April 2017 - likely not soon enough for customers who continue to receive exorbitant, and inaccurate, bills.
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