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NEWS
July 11, 2006
While the Ehrlich administration thinks about drafting a policy for selling fresh water on or under publicly owned lands, the Department of Natural Resources says it wants to consider all options in order to "avoid a problem down the road." That's easy enough. Don't sell the water. The state already allows some buildings in Carroll County and a Western Maryland ski resort to tap into nearby public water supplies, but the current issue is not about them or how they are able to use the resource despite the lack of a formal procedure within the DNR. The matter is bubbling up now because of growth and the pressure of growth around small towns - mostly in the rolling Piedmont countryside - and outside state parks.
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NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | June 7, 2006
Declaring that water levels have returned to normal, Anne Arundel County officials lifted yesterday an outdoor ban on public water usage in the western and northern sections of the county. Although the ban is lifted, communities from Maryland City to Brooklyn Park remain under mandatory water restrictions until Oct. 1. Voluntary limits on public water usage for the Marley Neck Peninsula, excluding Gibson Island, also are in effect during the same period. County officials asked that residents in affected areas remain diligent in complying with the restrictions so there is an adequate water supply for customers and fire protection.
NEWS
By PHILLIP MCGOWAN and PHILLIP MCGOWAN,SUN REPORTER | June 2, 2006
Anne Arundel County officials, saying that too many residents in the northern and western parts of the county are ignoring water restrictions despite a severe shortage, said they plan to crack down on violators if there isn't more compliance. In a news conference yesterday in Annapolis, County Executive Janet S. Owens said many residents are not heeding those restrictions and implored them to take measures seriously. Ronald E. Bowen, the director of the county's Public Works Department, agreed: "We don't believe our customers are complying with the weather restrictions as well as we need them to do."
NEWS
By MARLA CONE and MARLA CONE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 24, 2006
A national panel of scientists has charged the federal government with allowing too much fluoride in drinking water, which leaves children at risk of severe tooth enamel damage and adults prone to weakening of bones that could cause fractures. The Environmental Protection Agency requested that the National Academies' National Research Council re-examine its standard, which now allows a maximum of 4 milligrams of fluoride per liter of water. Some communities add fluoride to drinking water to protect against tooth decay, although in concentrations much lower than the EPA's standard.
NEWS
By LAURA BARNHARDT and LAURA BARNHARDT,SUN REPORTER | March 19, 2006
CLARIFICATION An article in Sunday's editions about drinking water in the Jacksonville area of Baltimore County included an incomplete account of an attorney's description of carbon filtration systems for wells. Such systems are not typically recommended for use by people with compromised or undeveloped immune systems if the filtration systems do not include an ultraviolet light to reduce bacteria growth, said Mary V. Koch, a lawyer representing area residents in a class action lawsuit.
NEWS
February 15, 2006
The chairman of Maryland's water advisory committee says people often don't understand why he jokes about praying for drought. They don't see that M. Gorman "Reds" Wolman, a geography professor at the John Hopkins University, is just grasping for a way to warn them that drinking water is an increasingly unreliable resource even in this coastal playground. Eighteen months after Mr. Wolman's committee recommended sweeping changes in the management of water resources and tougher enforcement of existing protections, land developers are still driving the process, charming or bullying county and municipal officials into approving projects with little or no thought to what their impact on the water supply might be. As if building a wider pipe or digging a deeper well were all there is to it. The latest irresponsible example came last week when the Mount Airy Town Council agreed to add 275 homes to that tiny community already under state development curbs because of wells running dry. Town leaders seek to circumvent the state ban by having the developer tap into a none-too-clean section of the Patapsco River.
NEWS
By TIMOTHY B. WHEELER and TIMOTHY B. WHEELER,SUN REPORTER | February 5, 2006
To house its growing congregation, St. James Episcopal Church in Mount Airy wants to build a bigger sanctuary and nursery school on a 12-acre campus a mile north of its historic home on Main Street. But groundbreaking for the new $2.6 million church complex has been on hold for months until more water can be found. So have other projects aimed at reviving the old Main Street of this one-time whistle-stop community straddling the Carroll and Frederick county lines. "Who would have thought somebody living in Maryland, where it's rainy, would have a problem with water?"
NEWS
By CHING-CHING NI and CHING-CHING NI,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 24, 2005
BEIJING -- The Chinese government provided details yesterday of its efforts to contain the second major environmental disaster to hit the country's waterways in little more than a month. State media reported that authorities sealed dams and pumped neutralizing chemicals into the Bei River after a toxic spill of cadmium Tuesday from a smelter in southern China's Guangdong province, where thousands of factories make up the manufacturing hub of a booming export-driven economy. As the spill threatened the provincial capital of Guangzhou north of Hong Kong, the gates of two dams downstream were closed for the cleanup effort, Wang Zhensheng, a local Communist Party official, told the official China Daily.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 13, 2005
BOLINAS, CALIF. - - Blessed with a quaint downtown and some of the most impressive scenery on the Pacific Coast, this town is largely unknown even in San Francisco, 20 miles south. To keep that from changing, residents have a habit of tearing down highway signs that so much as mention Bolinas. The same urge to remain pristine has led to one of the most extreme anti-growth policies in the nation. For more than 30 years, Bolinas has refused to authorize a single new water meter, needed for hooking up to the town water supply.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE and MARY GAIL HARE,SUN REPORTER | November 6, 2005
Water shortages and burdened public facilities are deterring development throughout Carroll County, but particularly in areas where officials are trying to encourage growth. A lack of new water sources is curtailing residential and industrial development in Taneytown. New Windsor and Hampstead cannot add more homes or businesses until they expand wastewater treatment plants. Future development in South Carroll, already the county's most populous area, depends on the success of several new wells and millions of dollars in upgrades to the Freedom Water Treatment Plant that will take at least two years to complete.
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