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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | July 29, 2007
The water supply in Harford has yet to be affected by the drought as significantly as other jurisdictions in Maryland, but county officials are anxiously watching the at-risk sources and urging residents to take conservation measures. There are no restrictions on water use in Harford, as have been implemented in other areas in the region, but that could change if the dry conditions persist, county officials said. "We are asking people to be mindful of dry conditions and to conserve wherever possible," said Joel Caudill, deputy director of the county's Public Works Department.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | June 7, 2007
Grappling with an ever-tightening water supply, the growing town of Mount Airy has given up on tapping nearby rivers in favor of a renewed search for wells that can produce enough water so that homes already approved there can be built. This week, the Town Council approved a new agreement with the Maryland Department of the Environment limiting development until additional sources of water can be found to supplement the 10 wells now supplying the community of nearly 8,500 residents on the border of Carroll and Frederick counties.
NEWS
May 10, 2007
Professor tells group of gun program successes A gathering of Baltimore lawyers, judges and politicians listened to a Johns Hopkins University professor explain ways to reduce illegal guns at yesterday's Criminal Justice Coordinating Council meeting. About a week after Mayor Sheila Dixon announced that tracking guns would be a priority for her administration, Daniel M. Webster, associate professor at Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health, explained some of the programs that have worked in other cities.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | April 22, 2007
Let's talk trash. Not the nasty verbiage or playground hoops variety. Garbage. Rubbish. Trash. You know, the kind of stuff that decorates our landscape. On the opening day of put-and-take trout fishing, I was grossed out by the amount of fishing line hanging from tree limbs and wrapped around bushes and rocks at a number of spots. Equally disturbing - the number of discarded white cardboard bait cartons floating in back eddies and bumping along the shore. Several of you have noticed, too. You've gotten in touch with me in recent weeks to comment about the volume of crud you've found streamside, trailside and roadside this spring.
NEWS
February 18, 2007
Ample water supply critical in planning The article "Summit Wrestles with Smart Growth vs. Water" (Feb. 4) rightly highlights the critical need for long-term planning to manage water. The summit is a positive step toward solving water issues in Carroll County. Couching the discussion as either Smart Growth or water does a disservice to the critical issues surrounding water supply in Maryland. Current policies do not force growth into rural areas. They do, though, make it essential for communities to determine whether adequate water is available before approving new growth.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | December 17, 2006
Two Westminster-area residents object to Carroll County's decision to include their preserved farms within the boundaries for the proposed Union Mills reservoir, part of the 2006 county water and sewer master plan. The draft plan stresses the need to acquire land for potential reservoirs at Gillis Falls and Union Mills -- projects first envisioned in the 1970s -- to meet future water demands in Westminster, South Carroll and the Hampstead/Manchester area. "We've been talking about this ongoing need for water supply in the county, particularly in the Westminster area," county Planning Director Steven C. Horn said in a public hearing on the plan last week.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,sun reporter | October 4, 2006
The discovery of the bacteria that cause Legionnaires' disease in a Hagerstown prison's water supply has prompted Maryland officials to restrict showers in one housing unit and to limit inmates and staff assigned there to drinking bottled water, prison officials said yesterday. Prison and health officials ordered tests of the water at Roxbury Correctional Institution after a former inmate was diagnosed with Legionnaires' disease a few days after his release last month, said George Gregory, a spokesman for the state prison system.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | September 30, 2006
When Las Vegas felt squeezed between its limited water supply and booming growth, it started paying residents $1 per square foot to replace their thirsty green lawns with drought-resistant gardens of cow's tongue cactus and Mexican feather grass. Santa Barbara, Calif., spent millions building a desalination plant to purify water from the Pacific Ocean. In Maryland, growth in Carroll and Frederick counties has also collided with water supplies. But the problem here isn't nearly as severe, and the solutions are likely to be less exotic.
NEWS
September 29, 2006
Officials at the Maryland Department of the Environment had little choice but to warn Westminster to stop issuing building permits until the city develops an adequate water supply. In times of drought, Westminster is susceptible to a water shortage, not only because of inadequate resources but also because officials there have permitted so much new development in recent years. By the city's own accounting, about 500 new residential connections are in various stages of approval. That's big growth in a community of 18,000.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | July 28, 2006
Exxon Mobil Corp. has notified 120 residents in the Fallston area of Harford County that it will stop supplying them with free bottled water, two years after a gasoline leak at its Upper Crossroads station that is suspected to have contaminated underground wells. Residents with nondetectable or low-level traces of the gas additive, methyl tertiary butyl ether, received the letters this month from Exxon informing them of the decision, according to the company. About 200 households in the Fallston area have filtration systems treating their well water to remove low levels of MTBE discovered in the summer of 2004.
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