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By Dan Rodricks | November 1, 2010
I stood on the Prettyboy Dam again recently and looked down at the thrilling — for these parts, anyway — vision of water spilling out of the gates below, crashing into the big plunge pool and sending the metropolitan area's drinking water down the Gunpowder River, its tree canopy just starting to burn autumn around the edges. About 100 years ago, a municipal water engineer named V. Bernard Siems traveled to northern Baltimore County and hiked along this river until he came upon a high rocky gorge.
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NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson , candy.thomson@baltsun.com | December 10, 2009
Ribbons of hard-packed dirt with nicknames like Sam's Grave, Seminary Loop and Ewok stitch the woods around Loch Raven Reservoir, a training ground for world-champion mountain bikers and urban warriors for more than a decade. But city officials want to halt off-road use by bikers and others trying to reach the water's edge, saying the activity increases erosion and runoff into the reservoir and makes water treatment more expensive. Six watershed rangers have been hired this year with seven more on the way whose duties include enforcing a 10-year-old policy that requires bikers to stay on maintained fire roads.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | October 24, 2009
Workers began disinfecting the water at Stadium Place on Friday while officials wait to learn whether the apartment complex was the source of the Legionnaire's disease that has killed one elderly resident and sickened five others. Specialists from Legionella Risk Management added chlorine dioxide, a chemical used in treatment systems, to the water supply at the senior facility on the former site of Memorial Stadium, and 10 two-person teams swept through individual apartments to flush out water pipes and raise the temperature on water heaters.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, Liz F. Kay and Jacques Kelly and Mary Gail Hare, Liz F. Kay and Jacques Kelly,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com, liz.kay@baltsun.com and jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | April 30, 2009
A water main break in southwest Baltimore County crippled train service along the Northeast corridor for most of Wednesday, and delays will continue into Thursday. Amtrak and MARC train service between Baltimore and Washington were stalled by the pre-dawn water main break in the 5100 block of Washington Blvd. in Halethorpe, affecting dozens of trains and thousands of passengers. Water, mud and tree branches covered the tracks. The major water main break was the second in two days. On Tuesday, a break blocks from the Inner Harbor flooded streets and closed offices and businesses in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
August 27, 2008
The abundance of deer around Baltimore's Loch Raven Reservoir is no mere nuisance. It has damaged the forest, wiping out habitat for other species and threatening the region's drinking water supply. Under those circumstances, limited hunting on the city-owned property is not only a reasonable but also an overdue decision. Authorities in Baltimore and Baltimore County plan to allow seasonal bowhunting on the northern portions of Loch Raven beginning in mid-September and then employ licensed professional deer hunters to conduct a closely supervised and targeted harvest of animals in the southern areas early next year.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | July 19, 2008
Deer Creek will be increasingly stressed by population growth in the next two decades, much of it caused by expansion at Aberdeen Proving Ground because of BRAC, according to a new regional study. The communities that rely on Deer Creek should develop additional water sources, the study by the Susquehanna River Basin Commission said. The Deer Creek watershed, a 171-square-mile area that begins in York County, Pa., and continues through Harford County to the Susquehanna River, includes a 73-mile stream that supplies about 50,000 people with water.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporter | May 11, 2008
County and municipal leaders are moving forward with a partnership that would establish one regional water system and consolidate the myriad facilities that now supply Harford's homes and businesses. County Executive David R. Craig, with support from the mayors of the three municipalities, will seek a $300,000 state grant to fund a consultant's study of the regional water supply. The research will focus on benefits, costs and drawbacks to joining the systems under one authority. Pooled resources will maximize the assets and save on operations and maintenance costs, officials said.
NEWS
By Alan Zarembo and Alan Zarembo,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 1, 2008
Human-caused global warming has been shrinking the snowpack across the mountain ranges of the West for five decades, suggesting that the region's long battle for water will only worsen, according to a computer analysis released yesterday. As temperatures have increased, more winter precipitation has fallen as rain instead of snow, and the snow is melting sooner, reported the study published in the journal Science. The result is that rivers are flowing faster in the spring, raising the risk of flooding, and slower in the summer, raising the risk of drought.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | August 20, 2007
It has been a hot, dry month of Code Reds and cooling centers - just the weather that M. Gordon "Reds" Wolman loves. The longtime Johns Hopkins University professor is not some sort of glutton for punishment. He just wants Marylanders to think about water - how much we have now and how much we will need later - and he knows the best time to ponder those questions is when the cornfields turn brown and the wells look as if they might run dry. "I'm not in favor of creating a Dante's inferno.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 2, 2007
Dear People Who Are Moving to Maryland Because of the Military Base Realignment, Hello from area code 410. While you're stressing about the move and trying to decide on a place to live, here are 100 reasons to consider the City of Baltimore: 1. We have lots of room. Population was 950,000 in 1950. It's about 635,000 today. 2. There's new energy in this city, and we need new citizens to keep the momentum. 3. You'll feel wanted. 4. Friends from the suburbs will consider you urbane. 5. We have oodles of rowhouses waiting for new owners, new paint, new decks.
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