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EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | March 8, 2012
The Harford County public and municipal elected officials in Aberdeen, Bel Air and Havre de Grace need to pay particularly close attention three bills on water and sewer issues that are scheduled for hearings before the Harford County Council this Tuesday, March 13, beginning at 6:30 p.m. Though the bills to some degree reflect a move in the general direction of a unified water system for the county, the question whether the county needs such...
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RECORD STAFF REPORT | December 22, 2011
Artesian Water Maryland, a subsidiary of Artesian Resources Corporation, announced Wednesday it has completed the purchase of several Cecil County local water systems, including the water system of the Town of Port Deposit. Artesian purchased the water system and assets of the Town of Port Deposit, including access to the Susquehanna River as a water supply, the company said in a news release. On the eastern end of the county, Artesian built an interconnection between its Delaware water utility subsidiary and the Town of Elkton and invested in system upgrades to ensure up to 1.5 million gallons of water a day to Elkton and sufficient additional capacity to serve Cecil County's growth corridor as it develops, the company said.
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October 20, 2011
Editor: An Oct. 14 Aegis editorial noted that justice was served when Aberdeen received $2.5 million from a class action suit in a groundwater contamination case. A gasoline leak contaminated Aberdeen's water supply well with benzene, which causes cancer, and the settlement was for costs the city incurred because of the leak. The editorial noted "Aberdeen has been fortunate insofar as the municipal drinking water supply ... could relatively easily be supplemented by the county's water system.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 2, 2011
If you head out to Loch Raven today for the Dam Jam festival celebrating the Baltimore metropolitan area's amazing water supply, remember three things: Texas, Abel Wolman and that thing called foresight. Every time I get into this subject, I reveal my inner nerd and my outer wow. I think our water system, which delivers billions of gallons to 1.2 million of us every year without fanfare or failure - give or take a water main break now and then - is an extraordinary human achievement.
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By EDITORIAL FROM THE RECORD | July 22, 2011
For a jurisdiction that wants to grow but lacks adequate drinking water supplies to do so without relying on others, the Aberdeen city government's recent decision to permit the erection of underground gasoline tanks in an area close to water supply wells used by Harford County is ridiculous and downright shortsighted. The Aberdeen City Council last week voted narrowly to give the go-ahead to Royal Farms to build one of its ubiquitous convenience stores and gas stations at the corner of Newton Lane and Route 7, a half a block away from the busy Route 715 access corridor toAberdeen Proving Ground.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | July 14, 2011
The world's elite have a problem so big it can't even be hinted at in public discussion: There are now too many people to manage. Seven billion and counting, billions more than are needed for human societies to flourish — and thus, most dispensable in this age where technology enables ever more work to be done by ever fewer workers. Global population is projected to increase by 50 percent by 2050, and despite the ongoing pretense that natural resources are infinite, the fact is they are not, and the smart people know this.
NEWS
February 14, 2011
The Sun's editorial "Go slow on shale drilling" (Feb. 14) points out very well the risks of mining for gas by using hydraulic fracturing. But one risk not mentioned and that needs to be emphasized is the fact that if the amount of water needed for high volume hydraulic fracturing is used, the fresh water supply for ourselves and our children will be endangered. High volume fracturing, which digs down to 10,000 feet to create fractures in shale through which natural gas can flow for collection, necessitates using millions of gallons of fresh water for each well; because it will be contaminated, this water will probably not be returned to the watershed.
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By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
It's the sort of project that might soften objections to suburban development: a Wegmans supermarket that peddles everything from $6 takeout meals to black truffles that can retail for $400 per pound. But the planned Wegmans in Anne Arundel County, part of a $300 million project called The Village at Waugh Chapel South, has sparked protests from some nearby residents. They fear that fly ash soil contamination at the site — a former dump — could pollute their drinking water.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
Researchers at the University of Maryland Baltimore County and other institutions have been given $5 million to study how development affects water quality and supply, and how urban landscapes might influence climate. The five-year grant from the National Science Foundation will be shared among 13 scientists, engineers and social scientists at UMBC, the University of Maryland College Park, and seven other institutions and government agencies. Catonsville-based UMBC, which will lead the effort, is to get $1.5 million.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | November 1, 2010
I stood on the Prettyboy Dam again recently and looked down at the thrilling — for these parts, anyway — vision of water spilling out of the gates below, crashing into the big plunge pool and sending the metropolitan area's drinking water down the Gunpowder River, its tree canopy just starting to burn autumn around the edges. About 100 years ago, a municipal water engineer named V. Bernard Siems traveled to northern Baltimore County and hiked along this river until he came upon a high rocky gorge.
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